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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2012
The League of Women Voters and the Towson branch of the Baltimore County Public Library have scheduled several discussions, starting Thursday, on referendums that will appear on the Nov. 6 ballot. A panel will delve into Perspectives on the Dream Act, the measure that would allow in-state tuition rates to children of illegal immigrants, at 6:30 p.m. Thursday. Panelists include Mark Krikorian, executive director at the Center for Immigration Studies; Tamar Jacoby, president of ImmigrationWorks USA; and Patricia Chiriboga-Roby, office director of World Relief Immigration Legal Clinic.
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NEWS
By Eliza Newlin and Eliza Newlin,States News Service | March 20, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Black men in Baltimore and other American cities are in the midst of a deepening crisis, according to a congressional panel that recommends education and job training as key antidotes."
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,Sun Staff Writer | November 2, 1994
Howard County victims' rights advocates and social service administrators spent three hours yesterday watching a satellite-linked panel discussion by national leaders on ways to stem violence in America.And they came away frustrated because what they consider the most pervasive form of violence in the county wasn't addressed."I think they're afraid of looking at family violence," said Stephanie Sites, executive director of the Domestic Violence Center of Howard County. "If you're not safe in your home, you're not safe anywhere."
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | December 15, 2002
Julia Walsh Gouge entered her fourth term as a Carroll commissioner with tremendous momentum. After enduring four years of being outvoted by former Commissioners Donald I. Dell and Robin Bartlett Frazier, she left the conservative duo in her dust during the county's Republican primary and emerged as the top vote-getter in last month's general election. Two weeks ago, she began her new term as the president of a board that in its first two days cast votes to reshape county policy on a slew of major issues.
NEWS
By BEN WATTENBERG | June 15, 1995
Dayton, Ohio. -- There are no typical Americans, but I recently spent four hours here with 19 nice people who are surely not untypical.The participants were divided into two focus groups. The key ''screens'' for recruiting the panels were: total family income from $25,000 to $75,000, suburban residence, registered voters, ideological and party balance, and an education level no higher than a bachelor's degree. (Pollster Fred Steeper, who organized the sessions, believes that panelists with advanced degrees tend to lecture, not converse.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | March 20, 1992
In a hot and brilliantly lit studio at Maryland Public Television in Owings Mills, a group of women sat around a horseshoe desk Wednesday night and discussed politics while cameras and tape machines whirred, clicked, hummed and recorded their images and words. It was some talk. The women were taping a new weekly PBS series. "To the Contrary," a national, prime-time news analysis show, features women as host and regular panelists, instead of the usual nearly all-male lineups.Host Bonnie Erbe, legal affairs correspondent for the Mutual/NBC Radio networks, asked panelist Kate O'Beirne of the Heritage Foundation what she thought of the presidential field and the expected nominations of Bill Clinton and George Bush after convincing wins by each the day before.
NEWS
By George W. Liebmann | August 26, 2003
WHEN LEADING criminal justice officials in Baltimore get together, the frequent result is mutual blame and requests for more money. A recent discussion provided a refreshing exception to this rule. The panelists -- who included four judges, among them a federal judge -- came up with some concrete, inexpensive suggestions for reform. They were: The number of peremptory challenges of jurors should be curtailed. Each side can strike jurors without giving reasons. In serious cases, between 15 and 30 citizens are thus turned into cannon fodder.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | May 15, 1993
Kathleen Turner may or may not win an Oscar for her performance in John Waters' "Serial Mom," but she certainly deserves one for her performance at a Thursday press conference on the set of the movie in Towson.Radiant, ebullient, blazing with charisma and wit, Turner dominated a panel of actors and executives, including Waters himself, and did such a good job of it and kept everybody so royally entertained, nobody seemed to mind.Dressed for the part of a conventional Everymom who just happens to kill people -- in a shapeless beige house dress and espadrilles -- she looked so suburban you wanted to invite her to a Tupperware party, that is if today weren't her car pool day. But Turner was so busy imitating the best parts of Katharine Hepburn, Tallulah Bankhead and Elizabeth Taylor, and so forcefully being the life of the party -- any party, all parties -- that most in attendance were more likely to ask for an autograph.
NEWS
By Tony Brown | February 2, 1993
I WAS assaulted on a television show once when I introduced data from a RAND Corporation study showing that 75 percent of black males earn a middle-class income. In fact, all of the panelists on that show -- 13 very prominent black professionals -- were so convinced that blacks are universally victimized that any good news, any statistical fact showing black men are not being exterminated, completely upset the agenda.But the real threat to black men is not extermination. It is the XTC psychological crippling caused by middle-class blacks, who incessantly drum into young black males the lie that they are becoming extinct.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Staff Writer | June 5, 1993
Gov. William Donald Schaefer yesterday named the remaining six members of a powerful commission that will oversee health care reform in Maryland, picking people who appear to have more health-care and insurance ties than the General Assembly envisioned.A new law requires that four of the seven members "be individuals who do not have any connection with the management or policy of a health care provider or payer."But the attorney general's office has advised the governor that the appointees meet the criteria.
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