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By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | November 29, 2001
Canton's emergence as a hub for Baltimore's young professionals has spurred interest in the neighborhood's history from many of its newer residents. They've learned that the bars and restaurants that dominate the waterfront neighborhood were turn-of-the-20th-century silent movie houses, furniture shops, pharmacies and shoe stores. And that generations of families lived in the skinny rowhouses that now, more often than not, are occupied by a single person or couple. A four-person panel of experts discussed the old neighborhood late Tuesday at the Canton Community Association's monthly meeting.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2012
Baltimore officials said Wednesday that they plan to bring together a panel of experts and hire an outside firm in their search for the city's next police commissioner, even as two potential candidates got an audition of sorts before the City Council. Spokesman Ryan O'Doherty said a panel of law enforcement and legal experts will work with Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's deputy chief of public safety and operations, Yolanda Jiggetts, to find a replacement for Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III. He announced his retirement last week, effective Aug. 1. An outside search firm is likely to be brought in, though specifics were still being worked out as officials seek to fill other key vacancies at City Hall.
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NEWS
By Michael Hawthorne and Michael Hawthorne,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 18, 2005
PARKERSBURG, W. Va. - More than 50 years after DuPont started producing Teflon near this Ohio River town, federal officials are accusing the company of hiding information suggesting that a chemical used to make the popular stick- and stain-resistant coating might cause cancer, birth defects and other ailments. Environmental regulators are particularly alarmed because scientists are finding perfluorooctanoic acid, PFOA, in the blood of people worldwide and it takes years for the chemical to leave the body.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,michael.dresser@baltsun.com | September 6, 2008
Prompted by the discovery of previously undetected corrosion on the Bay Bridge, Gov. Martin O'Malley has ordered the state's transportation chief to assemble a panel of experts to evaluate Maryland's toll bridge and tunnel inspection program. The governor's office announced yesterday that Transportation Secretary John D. Porcari will bring together nationally recognized authorities on bridge and tunnel engineering to review the Maryland Transportation Authority's inspection protocols and to recommend best practices.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | November 14, 2000
A panel of experts considering the effect of widening Route 32 through western Howard County had its first and only public meeting last night. Neil J. Pederson, deputy administrator of the State Highway Administration, told the seven-member panel that two work sessions set for Dec. 12 and Jan. 16 will be closed to the public. Pederson's announcement was protested by Dan Pontious, director of the Baltimore Regional Partnership, an umbrella group of five civic and environmental organizations.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,michael.dresser@baltsun.com | September 6, 2008
Prompted by the discovery of previously undetected corrosion on the Bay Bridge, Gov. Martin O'Malley has ordered the state's transportation chief to assemble a panel of experts to evaluate Maryland's toll bridge and tunnel inspection program. The governor's office announced yesterday that Transportation Secretary John D. Porcari will bring together nationally recognized authorities on bridge and tunnel engineering to review the Maryland Transportation Authority's inspection protocols and to recommend best practices.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | December 20, 1999
Look who got the boot at boot camp.A panel of experts is telling Hizzoner that something about the criminal justice system is not working. Oh.The credibility of "Wall Street Week" may have gone up when a panelist was indicted for kickbacks on trade orders: That's real life on the Street.
FEATURES
January 13, 1998
The Sun has assembled a panel of experts to address parents' concerns about reading -- from a psychologist and a pediatrician to an ophthalmologist and a reading teacher. We'll also ask other parents what's worked for them.Your questions and the responses of our experts will appear in our special "Reading by 9" pages on Sundays and Wednesdays, beginning soon in the Today section of The Sun.Address your concerns to: Ask the Experts, Reading by 9, Features Dept., The Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, Md. 21278Pub Date: 1/13/98
FEATURES
January 16, 1998
One of the most worrisome things for parents are signs their child is having difficulty learning to read, because they know reading is the key to an education.The Sun has assembled a panel of experts to address your concerns about reading and your child -- from a psychologist and a pediatrician to an ophthalmologist and a reading teacher. We also will ask other parents what has worked for them.Your questions and the responses of our experts will appear in our special "Reading by 9" pages on Sundays and Wednesdays, beginning soon in the Today section of The Sun. If you have a question, send it in and we'll get the answer.
SPORTS
December 10, 1999
The top 10 basketball players of the century as selected by a panel of experts for the Associated Press (listed in order of voting).No. 1 -- Michael Jordan: Six-time NBA champion with the Chicago Bulls who holds the NBA career record with 10 scoring titles. Named NBA MVP five times and won 1985 Rookie of the Year Award.Remaining top 10: Oscar Robertson, Wilt Chamberlain, Bill Russell, Magic Johnson, Larry Bird, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Elgin Baylor, Jerry West, Julius Erving.Voting panel: Lenny Wilkens, winningest coach in NBA history, nine-time All-Star; Bill Russell, Hall of Fame center, 11-time champion with the Boston Celtics; Chick Hearn, longtime play-by-play broadcaster for the Lakers; Fuzzy Levane, veteran scout for the Knicks; Harvey Pollack, longtime statistician for the 76ers; Marv Albert, in 32nd season calling NBA games.
NEWS
By Michael Hawthorne and Michael Hawthorne,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 18, 2005
PARKERSBURG, W. Va. - More than 50 years after DuPont started producing Teflon near this Ohio River town, federal officials are accusing the company of hiding information suggesting that a chemical used to make the popular stick- and stain-resistant coating might cause cancer, birth defects and other ailments. Environmental regulators are particularly alarmed because scientists are finding perfluorooctanoic acid, PFOA, in the blood of people worldwide and it takes years for the chemical to leave the body.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 25, 2004
WASHINGTON - Detainee abuses photographed at Abu Ghraib prison were the unauthorized "extracurricular activity" of soldiers working the nightshift at the Iraq facility, but leadership failures up the chain of command contributed to the scandal, an independent panel reported yesterday. Military commanders in Iraq failed to properly train or supervise the overworked and ill-prepared soldiers who served as guards, the panel of civilian defense experts said in its report, which also concluded that top-ranking Pentagon leaders failed to anticipate or swiftly react to problems at the notorious prison near Baghdad.
NEWS
February 14, 2003
GOV. ROBERT L. Ehrlich Jr. should listen to the go-slow critics of his slot machine proposal and take a year to study its vast potential impact. And he would be well advised to start by interviewing his Republican colleague, Nevada's governor, Kenny C. Guinn. Governor Guinn calls reliance on gambling fool's gold. His state's fiscal structure, he says, is almost as chancy as roulette. Slots, table games and tourism don't pay the freight in the state where big-time legalized gambling was born.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | August 31, 2002
The fish live. Two months after Crofton's snakehead infestation became an international sensation, one month after a panel of experts picked its poison to flush the fish from the pond, and almost two weeks after a herbicide cocktail was sprayed over the water, the fish are still biting. "There are still fish alive in the pond," John Surrick, a Department of Natural Resources spokesman who was at the pond yesterday, said ominously. "You can see them scatter as birds swoop across the surface."
BUSINESS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | January 16, 2002
Port Discovery is ranked among the top four children's museums in the country, based on a survey by Child magazine which hit newsstands yesterday. The museum followed long-established museums in Indianapolis, Houston and Boston. "Port Discovery is honored to be recognized as one of the best children's museum's in the U.S.," said Alan M. Leberknight, president and chief executive of Port Discovery. "We are proud of the experience we provide and work hard to ensure that a visit to Port Discovery increases a child's confidence, piques new interests and strengthens the bond between children and their parents."
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | November 29, 2001
Canton's emergence as a hub for Baltimore's young professionals has spurred interest in the neighborhood's history from many of its newer residents. They've learned that the bars and restaurants that dominate the waterfront neighborhood were turn-of-the-20th-century silent movie houses, furniture shops, pharmacies and shoe stores. And that generations of families lived in the skinny rowhouses that now, more often than not, are occupied by a single person or couple. A four-person panel of experts discussed the old neighborhood late Tuesday at the Canton Community Association's monthly meeting.
SPORTS
December 9, 1999
Boxing's greatestThe top 10 boxers of the century as selected by a panel of experts for the Associated Press (listed in order of voting).No. 1. -- Sugar Ray Robinson: Welterweight and five-time middleweight champion, 175-19-6, 109 KO's. 1940-65. 24.Remaining top 10: Muhammad Ali, Henry Armstrong, Joe Louis, Willie Pep, Jack Dempsey, Roberto Duran, Benny Leonard, Billy Conn, Harry Greb.Voting panel: Angelo Dundee, Hall of Fame trainer; Lou Duva, longtime promoter, manager and trainer; Eddie Futch, Hall of Fame trainer; Gil Clancy, Hall of Fame trainer; Don Chargin, longtime promoter.
SPORTS
December 7, 1999
Golf's greatestThe top male and female golfers of the century as selected by a panel of experts for the Associated Press (listed in order of voting).MaleNo. 1 -- Jack Nicklaus: Won 70 events on the PGA Tour and set the standard in major championships. He won all of them at least three times, including six Masters, for a total of 18.Remaining Top 10: Ben Hogan, Bobby Jones, Sam Snead, Byron Nelson, Arnold Palmer, Walter Hagen, Harry Vardon, Gary Player, Tom Watson.FemaleNo. 1 -- Mickey Wright: Won 82 times, including 13 majors, despite playing only 15 full seasons.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2001
The Baltimore area commercial real estate market is generally healthy, but it is so closely tied to the economy that the latest downturn is likely to make developing and marketing new hotels, shops and offices more difficult this year, a panel of experts said yesterday. The experts were convened by the Johns Hopkins University and the Urban Land Institute, and they expanded on a report released recently by the university's Allan L. Berman Real Estate Institute. For the third year, the report has documented both the industry's hard numbers on vacancies and other measures and gauged attitudes of the professionals involved.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | December 13, 2000
A panel of experts questioned the idea yesterday of using 4-year-old data to determine the long-term effects of widening Route 32 through western Howard County. The panel repeatedly asked state officials why data on development and traffic trends in the region were largely from 1996 or earlier - and what good the information is now. A handful of residents listened to the discussion, happy to be at a meeting that was originally intended to be closed to the public. Some people oppose widening Route 32, which changes from a four-lane, divided highway to a two-lane road past the intersection with Route 108 in Clarksville as it heads toward Carroll County.
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