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NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | March 12, 2004
Imagine this assignment: Find a way to raise $11 billion by 2010. That's the chore assigned to a 15-member Chesapeake Bay watershed finance panel appointed yesterday by the Chesapeake Executive Council. The group must come up with recommendations for financing bay restoration efforts by 2010 because state and federal officials have set that year for meeting bay cleanup targets. Their recommendations are due by the end of the year. Panel members include a former interior secretary, a former governor, financial and economic experts, and officials with experience in agriculture, air quality and funding for wastewater treatment plants.
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NEWS
November 5, 1995
IT IS TIME for members of the state task force on casinos to take a forthright stand firmly against this insidious form of gambling. No mincing of words, no hedging: Maryland and casinos won't mesh.Only by staking out such an unyielding stance can panel members put an end to this matter. Otherwise, casino companies will dip into their deep pockets to buy their way into Maryland. They have already started to do so in Cambridge, where the town's attorney is now on the payroll of a casino, and in Annapolis, where a slew of well-connected lobbyists are earning huge sums to capture the allegiance of state officials.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 23, 2002
KHARTOUM, Sudan - An international commission led by the United States condemned the Sudanese government yesterday for allowing slavery to flourish in this war-racked country. But the commission said the issue was not as clear-cut as it was often portrayed, and panel members questioned whether international Christian organizations that buy back slaves are helping the situation. Government officials here have long denied any role in what they call tribal abductions. As a show of concern, in 1999 Sudan created the Commission for the Elimination of Abductions of Women and Children to address the problem.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer JoAnna Daemmrich contributed to this article | April 21, 1996
A private panel of Baltimore leaders who want to substitute medical treatment for jail for the city's drug abusers is drafting a pilot program to prove that the controversial approach would work and to persuade businesses to help fund it.Details of the plan are developing, but members say the pilot program would take a sample of about 2,000 people from Baltimore's estimated 50,000 heroin and cocaine abusers and track them.Half would be treated medically and with traditional methods, and the other half would be watched as they go through the criminal justice system.
NEWS
March 1, 1993
Panel to study proposals for public golf courseA 10-member panel will begin reviewing proposals this week from private businessmen to build and operate a public golf course on Fort Smallwood Road.The committee was appointed by County Councilman Carl G. "Dutch" Holland, a Pasadena Republican, to foster public participation in the design and construction of a county-owned facility.The county acquired the 130 acres, formerly a horse farm, at the Water Oak Point Road intersection in the late-1980s.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 23, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The idea of forcing House Speaker Newt Gingrich to personally pay for his ethical misdeeds -- an unusual punishment that could cost him $300,000 -- came not from a Democrat but from a fellow Republican.In an interview yesterday, Rep. Steven H. Schiff of New Mexico said he suggested such a penalty during a meeting of the four-member ethics subcommittee that investigated the Gingrich case."I hate to say it," Schiff said. "I believe I came up with the idea of something of a monetary nature."
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | September 29, 2000
Plans to save the long-vacant USF&G Corp. building by converting it into a hotel for Hampton Inn & Suites won initial support yesterday from the city's Design Advisory Panel. The group also looked favorably on the latest revisions to the 225-room luxury Ritz-Carlton hotel planned for Federal Hill, with a few more suggestions on design. The Hampton Inn project calls for adding three stories on top of the former USF&G building, to create a total of 175 suites in the historic building, which has been empty for at least 15 years.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | October 30, 1996
BETHESDA -- North American Vaccine's new whooping cough vaccine received a mixed reception from a governmental advisory panel yesterday. Experts said they think it's safe and effective, yet don't know how effective."
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | January 9, 2004
The $130 million Four Seasons hotel and residence project, billed as an "urban resort," at Harbor East received preliminary approval from the city's design panel yesterday, opening the way for construction to start. Plans are to break ground by the end of summer and to open as early as 2006. Members of Baltimore's Design Advisory Panel praised the work done by Hill Glazier Architects of Palo Alto, Calif., in simplifying the design of the project, which is to feature 200 hotel rooms, 26 to 28 condominiums, spa facilities and retail space.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,ed.gunts@baltsun.com | January 8, 2010
Managers of Baltimore's Lyric Opera House plan to begin construction this summer on a multimillion-dollar expansion and modernization of its backstage area - part of an effort to make the 1894 theater more capable of accommodating elaborate, large-scale productions. Architect Jonathan Fishman of RCG Inc. presented revised plans for the project Thursday to the city's Urban Design and Architectural Review Panel. The latest design is a scaled-back version of previous plans. Sandy Richmond, executive director of the nonprofit Lyric Foundation that owns the building, said he did not have a cost estimate for the latest design.
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