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NEWS
By Robyn Shelton and Robyn Shelton,ORLANDO SENTINEL | August 18, 2005
ORLANDO, Fla. - NASA remains hobbled by the flawed leadership style and engineering practices that led to the Columbia disaster, according to members of an independent group that monitored the agency's safety efforts after the shuttle disintegrated during re-entry in 2003. Overall, the watchdog panel's final report yesterday found that NASA had made significant strides to correct the conditions that led to the deaths of the seven astronauts aboard Columbia. But seven of the group's 26 members delivered a separate assessment describing lingering problems in every aspect of NASA's efforts to return the space shuttle to flight.
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NEWS
July 1, 2014
A year after Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake pledged to reinvigorate the city's civilian police review board, panel members say nothing much has changed. That's hardly surprising. The board still lacks the power to investigate citizens' complaints of police misconduct in a timely fashion, and its recommendations are routinely ignored by the department. A panel so toothless that even its own members publicly wonder whether their efforts are a complete waste of time obviously isn't accomplishing its mission as a mediator of police-community relations.
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NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2011
Baltimore County Council members on Monday delayed introducing a wide-ranging ethics bill proposed by County Executive Kevin Kamenetz, saying they didn't have time to review the lengthy legislation. Council members now plan to introduce the bill at a legislative session planned for Nov. 21, rather than Monday as scheduled. The measure could then be voted on in December. Among other things, the bill would add teeth to a county charter rule against council members holding state jobs; prohibit county employees from taking gifts from people who do business with the county; and require the financial disclosure forms of elected officials to be posted online beginning in May 2012.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2013
A lawyer for Baltimore City says a task force appointed by the mayor to study the city's speed camera program did not hold an illegal closed-door meeting during a March visit to a contractor's headquarters. But a prominent member of the task force called the city's version of events "not true. " Assistant City Solicitor Hilary Ruley told state officials this week that a presentation to the task force was stopped once members realized the public had been barred from attending by Brekford Corp., the city's new camera vendor.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2012
Community activists say they are concerned that an advisory panel that will help Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake select Baltimore's next police commissioner lacks representatives from city neighborhoods.  In an e-mail to Rawlings-Blake sent Monday, Cortly Witherspoon and Marvin "Doc" Cheatham, who lead civil rights groups, asked Rawlings-Blake to consider adding community members to the panel. The concerns are also shared by members of the Police Community Relations councils, which hold monthly neighborhood meetings at each of the nine police districts.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | May 1, 2001
Most members of a panel of land-use experts concluded last night that widening Route 32 in western Howard would spur development throughout the region. Their estimates on how much varied from no additional houses to as many as 7,300. State Highway Administration officials asked the nine-member group to determine the impact improvements to Route 32 would have on Howard, Frederick, Carroll and Montgomery counties. The highway agency is considering three options for the section between Route 108 and Interstate 70: widening it from two lanes to four lanes and putting in interchanges, adding interchanges only, or leaving the road as it is. County officials and some residents are worried about safety on the road, which has become more congested with population increases in the region.
NEWS
By John Hendren and John Hendren,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 22, 2004
WASHINGTON - The Pentagon has removed three officers from a tribunal panel at Guantanamo, another snag in a controversial justice system for trials of alleged terrorists. Retired Maj. Gen. John D. Altenburg Jr., head of the Pentagon's Office of Military Commissions, agreed with defense attorneys who said the two regular panel members and one alternate had conflicts of interest that called their objectivity into question. But Altenburg refused defense demands that he throw off two others, including the panel's judge-like presiding officer.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 3, 2004
WASHINGTON - The independent commission investigating the Sept. 11 attacks is refusing to accept strict conditions set by the White House for the panel's interviews with President Bush and Vice President Dick Cheney, and is renewing its request for Bush's national security adviser to testify in public, commission members said. The panel members, interviewed after a private meeting yesterday, said the commission had decided for now to reject a White House request that the interview with Bush be limited to one hour, with the questioners limited to the panel's chairman and vice chairman.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | March 12, 2004
Imagine this assignment: Find a way to raise $11 billion by 2010. That's the chore assigned to a 15-member Chesapeake Bay watershed finance panel appointed yesterday by the Chesapeake Executive Council. The group must come up with recommendations for financing bay restoration efforts by 2010 because state and federal officials have set that year for meeting bay cleanup targets. Their recommendations are due by the end of the year. Panel members include a former interior secretary, a former governor, financial and economic experts, and officials with experience in agriculture, air quality and funding for wastewater treatment plants.
NEWS
November 5, 1995
IT IS TIME for members of the state task force on casinos to take a forthright stand firmly against this insidious form of gambling. No mincing of words, no hedging: Maryland and casinos won't mesh.Only by staking out such an unyielding stance can panel members put an end to this matter. Otherwise, casino companies will dip into their deep pockets to buy their way into Maryland. They have already started to do so in Cambridge, where the town's attorney is now on the payroll of a casino, and in Annapolis, where a slew of well-connected lobbyists are earning huge sums to capture the allegiance of state officials.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2013
President Barack Obama has named Gov. Martin O'Malley one of two co-chairmen of a panel of state and federal officials focused on defense and homeland security, the governor's office said Monday. The Maryland Democrat will co-chair the Council of Governors with Republican Gov. Terry Branstad of Iowa. The panel brings together 10 governors, the secretaries of defense and homeland security, the chief of the National Guard Bureau, the commandant of the Coast Guard, the commander of U.S. Northern Command and other key officials to discuss issues related to the National Guard, homeland security and defense support to civil authorities in the event of terrorism or natural disaster.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and Larry Perl, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2012
Baltimore's Urban Design and Architecture Review panel approved Thursday the master plan for a nearly 3 million-square-foot development at Harbor Point, between Harbor East and Fells Point, where Exelon's new headquarters is expected to be built. The removal of a proposed building and an accompanying playing field for U.S. Lacrosse was the most prominent change to the plan since it was first presented to the panel in early July. The national governing body for men's, women's and youth lacrosse decided to move to Baltimore County instead of to the city's waterfront, according to Harbor Point's developer.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2012
Key senators on the committee that handles casino-related matters rejected the notion of taking up the issue of Internet gambling during next week's special session, saying there isn't enough time to weigh the implications of a step that could, in effect, put slot machines in Maryland homes. Four Democratic members of the Senate Budget and Taxation Committee, each a supporter of other forms of gambling expansion, said Friday that they are not prepared to sort through the complex issues surrounding online gambling in a session that is expected to last less than a week.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2012
Community activists say they are concerned that an advisory panel that will help Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake select Baltimore's next police commissioner lacks representatives from city neighborhoods.  In an e-mail to Rawlings-Blake sent Monday, Cortly Witherspoon and Marvin "Doc" Cheatham, who lead civil rights groups, asked Rawlings-Blake to consider adding community members to the panel. The concerns are also shared by members of the Police Community Relations councils, which hold monthly neighborhood meetings at each of the nine police districts.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2011
Baltimore County Council members on Monday delayed introducing a wide-ranging ethics bill proposed by County Executive Kevin Kamenetz, saying they didn't have time to review the lengthy legislation. Council members now plan to introduce the bill at a legislative session planned for Nov. 21, rather than Monday as scheduled. The measure could then be voted on in December. Among other things, the bill would add teeth to a county charter rule against council members holding state jobs; prohibit county employees from taking gifts from people who do business with the county; and require the financial disclosure forms of elected officials to be posted online beginning in May 2012.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,ed.gunts@baltsun.com | January 8, 2010
Managers of Baltimore's Lyric Opera House plan to begin construction this summer on a multimillion-dollar expansion and modernization of its backstage area - part of an effort to make the 1894 theater more capable of accommodating elaborate, large-scale productions. Architect Jonathan Fishman of RCG Inc. presented revised plans for the project Thursday to the city's Urban Design and Architectural Review Panel. The latest design is a scaled-back version of previous plans. Sandy Richmond, executive director of the nonprofit Lyric Foundation that owns the building, said he did not have a cost estimate for the latest design.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 23, 2002
KHARTOUM, Sudan - An international commission led by the United States condemned the Sudanese government yesterday for allowing slavery to flourish in this war-racked country. But the commission said the issue was not as clear-cut as it was often portrayed, and panel members questioned whether international Christian organizations that buy back slaves are helping the situation. Government officials here have long denied any role in what they call tribal abductions. As a show of concern, in 1999 Sudan created the Commission for the Elimination of Abductions of Women and Children to address the problem.
BUSINESS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun reporter | March 14, 2008
Focusing less on the design of a proposed ski-lift-style gondola over the Inner Harbor than other issues, the city architectural panel questioned the private funding of such a transportation project and worried that the attraction could steal pedestrians away from a redesigned Pratt Street corridor. But the developers pitching the $40 million privately operated "SkyLine Baltimore" system to the Urban Design and Architecture Review Panel yesterday remained optimistic about their plan to connect the Convention Center to Fells Point via a seven-minute aerial ride.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,Arin.Gencer@baltsun.com | June 18, 2009
With Baltimore Mayor Sheila Dixon maintaining a public hands-off stance for now, some are waiting to see how she handles assault charges that have been filed by two city officials who previously were romantically involved. Beyond reiterating Wednesday that she has "a no-tolerance level for domestic violence," Dixon declined to comment further on the accusations that Elizabeth C. Smith, a liquor board commissioner, and Demaune Millard, her chief of staff, have made against each other. "This is a private matter - I want to give them that privacy to move through that process as we move forward," Dixon said.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com | February 27, 2009
The proposed design for a redeveloped Morris A. Mechanic Theatre in downtown Baltimore includes an inviting outdoor plaza and preserves much of the shuttered theater's architectural significance, but it falls short in its concept for a new 32-story hotel and residential tower, members of a city design panel said yesterday. Members of the Urban Design and Architecture Review Panel weighed in on the design proposed by Washington architect Shalom Baranes for redevelopment of the theater at Baltimore and Charles streets, built in 1967 as the centerpiece of one of downtown's earliest urban renewal efforts.
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