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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | May 18, 2012
Fifteen-year-old Jack Andraka of Crownsville won the top prize at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair for designing a new method to detect pancreatic cancer, Intel announced Friday. The fair, held in Pittsburgh, is the world's largest high school science research competition. Jack will receive $75,000 for first place. Jack used diabetic test paper to create a dip-stick sensor to test blood or urine for early-stage pancreatic cancer. It was deemed 90 percent accurate, and is 28 times faster and cheaper and over 100 times more sensitive than tests used now. The senior has a patent pending.
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NEWS
June 23, 2014
The death one week ago of baseball's Tony Gwynn, who is often remembered by Baltimoreans for his induction in the Hall of Fame in 2007 with Cal Ripken Jr. , called attention to the dangers of smokeless tobacco. The former San Diego Padres batting champ suffered from oral cancer and blamed two decades of chewing tobacco for his plight. As well-publicized as the health risks of tobacco may be in the U.S., the focus has been placed primarily on the dangers of cigarette smoking. That's understandable given the cigarettes are by far the most popular tobacco product.
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SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn | January 31, 2012
Archbishop Spalding football coach Mike Whittles plans to be on hand Saturday night at Ellie's Place in Millersville for a fundraiser for pancreatic cancer research. The event will kick off at 7 p.m. and will feature door prizes, a silent auction and a 50-50 raffle. Ellie's will also contribute 10 percent of its profits for the night. All proceeds will benefit the Mike Whittles Johns Hopkins Pancreatic Cancer Foundation. Whittles is approaching a year as a survivor of stage four pancreatic cancer and continues to undergo chemotherapy.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | June 19, 2014
Researchers in the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center have developed and begun testing a vaccine that can “reprogram” pancreatic cancers to potentially make them more treatable. Pancreatic cancer is among the most fatal types of cancer. It isn't often caught early and generally becomes resistant to standard chemotherapy drugs. This study was conducted on those with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas , the most common form of the cancer and one that gives patients just a five percent chance of surviving five years.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2011
Seeing a chance to stop one of the most deadly kinds of cancer before it forms, doctors at Johns Hopkins and at other hospitals around the nation are focusing on the common pancreatic cyst. Up to 20 percent of pancreatic cancer begins as one of these small, fluid-filled brown lesions. And left to grow unabated, pancreatic cancer kills 95 percent of sufferers within five years. "We have a wonderful opportunity to intervene at an early stage," Dr. Anne Marie Lennon , an assistant professor and director of a new Hopkins Multidisciplinary Pancreatic Cyst Program.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2011
Longtime WBAL talk-show host Ron Smith announced Monday on-air that he has pancreatic cancer. The 69-year-old Smith, who has been at the radio station since 1984, said he plans to stay on at WBAL as he seeks treatment. Smith told listeners Monday at the start of his 9 a.m. to noon weekday broadcast that he has been diagnosed with grade four pancreatic cancer. Smith quoted a Johns Hopkins doctor telling him, "You have grade four pancreatic cancer that's metastasized to your liver, your abdominal cavity, the lungs and so on. " As a result of the diagnosis that Smith received Friday, he said, "There are going to be some changes here.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2012
Dr. Constance A. "Connie" Griffin, an internationally known pancreatic cancer researcher who led the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center's Cytogenetics Core and was director of the Pathology Molecular Diagnostics Laboratory, died Jan. 8 of pancreatic cancer at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Ruxton resident was 60. "The irony is that Connie passed away from the very disease that she studied," said Dr. Ralph H. Hruban, director of the Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2014
The whiteboard that keeps track of Jack Andraka's schedule would be an exhausting blur for anyone, let alone a 16-year-old high school student: Last-minute requests are squeezed into already full days, scientific conferences bump up against speaking engagements, successive trips to India, Ireland and Harvard seem one missed connection away from a cascading disaster. It's no wonder the extraordinarily in-demand Andraka is sleepy-eyed on this recent day, but as it turns out, the reason is entirely ordinary - he was up late studying for a test at North County High School in Glen Burnie.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2012
Early Friday in a small, brightly lit operating room in Johns Hopkins Hospital, a half-dozen doctors and nurses huddled over the gut of a cancer patient, quietly passing metal instruments and surgical sutures. After more than four hours of cutting and sewing, the lead surgeon, Dr. John L. Cameron, lifted his slightly bloodied hands, thanked his colleagues and headed for the door. The 75-year-old immediately declared the complex, life-saving surgery "one of the simpler ones. " He should know.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2014
Nothing could save Albert P. "Skip" Viragh Jr. from pancreatic cancer, but a $65 million gift from his foundation will help other patients suffering from that and other deadly cancers. The money will be used to help pay for construction of a patient care building at the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, the medical institution announced Tuesday. The new building will bear the name of Viragh, an innovative Maryland mutual fund investor who died from pancreatic cancer in 2003 at age 62 after receiving treatment at Johns Hopkins.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2014
Nothing could save Albert P. "Skip" Viragh Jr. from pancreatic cancer, but a $65 million gift from his foundation will help other patients suffering from that and other deadly cancers. The money will be used to help pay for construction of a patient care building at the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, the medical institution announced Tuesday. The new building will bear the name of Viragh, an innovative Maryland mutual fund investor who died from pancreatic cancer in 2003 at age 62 after receiving treatment at Johns Hopkins.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and By Andrea K. Walker | April 21, 2014
A doctor with the The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins has received one of 14 grants totaling $5 million to support research of pancreatic cancer. The $1 million grant, awarded by The  Pancreatic Cancer Action Network  and the  American Association for Cancer Research ,  was given to Dr. Dung T. Le. The grants are aimed at research that could help improve pancreatic cancer survival rates. The Pancreatic Cancer Action Network has a goal to double pancreatic cancer survival by 2020.
NEWS
February 26, 2014
When it comes to the potential for on-the-job dangers, few workers can match the risks faced by firefighters. That they willingly run into places the rest of us would flee in terror, all to save our lives and property, is nothing short of remarkable. For that, we owe them not just gratitude but some degree of certainty that we will take care of them if their selflessness results in debilitating injury or disease. The difficulty is in determining just how much certainty we owe them.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2014
The whiteboard that keeps track of Jack Andraka's schedule would be an exhausting blur for anyone, let alone a 16-year-old high school student: Last-minute requests are squeezed into already full days, scientific conferences bump up against speaking engagements, successive trips to India, Ireland and Harvard seem one missed connection away from a cascading disaster. It's no wonder the extraordinarily in-demand Andraka is sleepy-eyed on this recent day, but as it turns out, the reason is entirely ordinary - he was up late studying for a test at North County High School in Glen Burnie.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2013
Radio host Ron Smith will be honored later this month with a posthumous induction into the Maryland DC Delaware Broadcasters Association Hall of Fame. The Maryland-District of Columbia-Delaware Broadcasters Association decided to present WBAL's longtime “Voice of Reason” with the tribute at their annual convention April 22 in Ellicott City. The organization called him “passionate,” “curious” and “a force on radio and television.” “Ron was thoughtful - never just accepting the word of a spokesperson or a headline,” the organization said in a release, adding that he “relentlessly pursued and sought to tell the truth.” Smith died in 2011 of pancreatic cancer, captivating listeners with his fight against the disease until just weeks before his death.
NEWS
Staff Reports | February 12, 2013
North County High School student Jack Andraka was slated to be a guest of First Lady Michelle Obama on Tuesday night at the State of the Union address in Washington. Jack Andraka, of Crownsville, was invited to sit in the box with the First Lady and also Dr. Jill Biden during President Barack Obama's address at the U.S. Capitol, according to a release from the White House. In 2012 Andraka, a sophomore at North County, was awarded first place in the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair for his discovery of a method to detect pancreatic cancer.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | November 17, 2011
Ron Smith went on WBAL radio Thursday, just as he has for the past 27 years. But the conservative talk-show host, who was recently diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, opened his show telling listeners — with characteristic bluntness — that he was abandoning his chemotherapy treatments. Instead, Smith will remain on the air while undergoing palliative care designed to make what time he has left as comfortable as possible. And then he simply went on with the show. "That's the way I've conducted my career," Smith, 69, said Thursday from his home in southern York County, Pa., where he's been doing most of his broadcasting work since announcing his inoperable Stage 4 cancer diagnosis on Oct. 17. "I have never been one to hide anything.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2011
The announcement summoning the Archbishop Spalding football team to the school chapel early on a February morning last winter baffled the Cavaliers. What could be so important in the off-season? Wide receiver Richard Gablemen and some of his teammates thought they would finally get their championship rings after winning the MIAA B Conference title the previous fall. Center Matt Wicklein and a few others figured they must be in trouble, but they couldn't figure out why. The news was bad, far worse than anyone imagined.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2013
J. Russell "Russ" Kimmel, a retired tire company executive, died Friday from pancreatic cancer at his Reisterstown home. He was 84. The son of a tire company owner and a homemaker, John Russell Kimmel — he never used his first name — was born in Baltimore and raised in Oakenshawe. He attended Calvert Hall College High School and left in 1945 to join his father, Charles E. Kimmel, who had established the Kimmel Tire Co. in 1938 on Mount Royal Avenue. From 1954 to 1956, he served in the Coast Guard.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2012
Dr. Alice Heisler Hissey, medical director of the University of Maryland Medical Center's Behavioral Pediatrics Clinic who also was a consultant to city public schools, died Oct. 18 of pancreatic cancer at her Columbia home. The former Catonsville and Laurel resident was 75. "When I arrived here six years ago, Alice befriended me and took the time and effort to come by my office and talk about the glorious history of this department," said Dr. Steve J. Czinn, professor and chair of the department of pediatrics at the University of Maryland School of Medicine where he is also physician-in-chief.
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