Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPancreas
IN THE NEWS

Pancreas

FEATURED ARTICLES
HEALTH
By Jonathan Pitts and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
As 7-year-old Zara Cheek packed her bags for her first sleep-away camp this summer, she found herself looking forward to more than just swimming, going on hikes and eating S'mores for two glorious weeks. To her, the experience meant a chance to live like a normal kid for a while - and even, quite possibly, to help thousands of others afflicted with the illness that has shaped her life. Zara, who lives in West Baltimore and started third grade this fall, is one of about 2 million Americans who suffer from Type 1 diabetes, a chronic and potentially lethal disorder of the pancreas that leaves the body unable to make insulin or turn blood sugar into the energy it needs.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Jonathan Pitts and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
As 7-year-old Zara Cheek packed her bags for her first sleep-away camp this summer, she found herself looking forward to more than just swimming, going on hikes and eating S'mores for two glorious weeks. To her, the experience meant a chance to live like a normal kid for a while - and even, quite possibly, to help thousands of others afflicted with the illness that has shaped her life. Zara, who lives in West Baltimore and started third grade this fall, is one of about 2 million Americans who suffer from Type 1 diabetes, a chronic and potentially lethal disorder of the pancreas that leaves the body unable to make insulin or turn blood sugar into the energy it needs.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Glenn Graham and Glenn Graham,glenn.graham@baltsun.com | September 18, 2008
McDonogh junior midfielder Jake Weiner, who suffered a lacerated pancreas during a soccer game Saturday, remains at Johns Hopkins Hospital and is scheduled to have surgery today. Weiner initially had been scheduled to undergo surgery Tuesday afternoon, but the operation was postponed because of continued swelling. The procedure involves running a tube through his pancreatic duct so that the duct stays open to save the pancreas, according to Jake's mother, Jeannie Weiner. After Saturday's game against Perry Hall, Weiner was suffering from abdominal pain and went to the emergency room at Greater Baltimore Medical Center.
NEWS
April 4, 2014
We were pleased to read the article "Sister of 11-year-old with diabetes raises $110K for research " (April 1), in The Sun because of our own family's experience with type 1 diabetes. Over 10 years ago, our grandson was diagnosed with the disease and has grown up so much faster than his brother or his sister who do not have it. We have watched him under our daughter's supervision endure a daily regimen involving checking blood sugar and multiple insulin injections daily so he can live.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | May 4, 1997
NORFOLK, Va. - Researchers at Eastern Virginia Medical School believe they have isolated the gene that sparks rebirth of the cells that produce insulin, the hormone that diabetics lack - but need - to stay alive.The discovery could be a major advance in treating diabetes, a potentially fatal disease characterized by the inability to make or use the insulin vital to processing sugar and other carbohydrates.The findings also could help insulin-dependent diabetics say goodbye to daily shots of the hormone, said Aaron Vinik, leader ** of the research team at the EVMS Diabetes Institutes Foundation in Norfolk.
NEWS
By Glenn Graham and Glenn Graham,glenn.graham@baltsun.com | September 17, 2008
With a two-goal performance from sophomore forward Julian Griggs and an organized defensive effort throughout, the No. 4 McDonogh boys soccer team came away with a 3-0 win over host and No. 2 Mount St. Joseph yesterday. McDonogh, which was coming off Saturday's 2-1 upset loss to Perry Hall, improved to 3-1 overall and 2-0 in the Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association A Conference and handed the Gaels (3-1, 2-1) their first defeat. The Eagles dedicated the victory to teammate Jake Weiner, who underwent surgery yesterday at Johns Hopkins Hospital to repair a pancreas that was lacerated during Saturday's game.
NEWS
December 31, 2009
Johns Hopkins University President Ronald J. Daniels will return to work full-time next week after two months of recuperation from surgery to remove a tumor from his abdomen. It was not malignant and Daniels, 50, did not have to undergo follow-up therapy after his October surgery. A seven-hour surgery to remove part of Daniels' pancreas, called a Whipple procedure, was deemed a success at the time, and his recovery took about as long as expected. Daniels, who became the university's 14th president in March, worked part-time in December.
NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Sun Staff Writer | August 4, 1994
Despite a monthlong stay in a Baltimore hospital, railroad-track incisions across her abdomen and various surgery-related illnesses, Darlene Ellen Jones relaxed in a rocker in her Union Bridge home and faced recovery from her recent pancreas transplant with humor and grace."
NEWS
April 4, 2014
We were pleased to read the article "Sister of 11-year-old with diabetes raises $110K for research " (April 1), in The Sun because of our own family's experience with type 1 diabetes. Over 10 years ago, our grandson was diagnosed with the disease and has grown up so much faster than his brother or his sister who do not have it. We have watched him under our daughter's supervision endure a daily regimen involving checking blood sugar and multiple insulin injections daily so he can live.
NEWS
April 3, 2012
Saint Agnes Hospital is proud to announce the launch of The Hodes Liver & Pancreas Center, Saint Agnes Hospital's newest expansion of services.  The Center will be led by Dr. Mark Fraiman, a hepatobiliary and pancreatic surgeon, who is one of the few doctors in the area performing highly complex procedures for the treatment of liver and pancreas diseases, and is regionally recognized as an expert in the Whipple surgery - a procedure which removes...
NEWS
April 3, 2012
Saint Agnes Hospital is proud to announce the launch of The Hodes Liver & Pancreas Center, Saint Agnes Hospital's newest expansion of services.  The Center will be led by Dr. Mark Fraiman, a hepatobiliary and pancreatic surgeon, who is one of the few doctors in the area performing highly complex procedures for the treatment of liver and pancreas diseases, and is regionally recognized as an expert in the Whipple surgery - a procedure which removes...
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2010
Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center has received a $20 million donation for pancreas cancer research and patient care, the largest donation for such research in its history. The award came from Albert P. "Skip" Viragh Jr., founder of Rockville-based Rydex Investment, a mutual fund investment company. Viragh, who died of the disease at 62, was a Hopkins patient. The money will fund the existing laboratory, expand clinical programs and contribute to new research at the newly named Skip Viragh Center for Pancreas Cancer Clinical Research and Patient Care.
NEWS
December 31, 2009
Johns Hopkins University President Ronald J. Daniels will return to work full-time next week after two months of recuperation from surgery to remove a tumor from his abdomen. It was not malignant and Daniels, 50, did not have to undergo follow-up therapy after his October surgery. A seven-hour surgery to remove part of Daniels' pancreas, called a Whipple procedure, was deemed a success at the time, and his recovery took about as long as expected. Daniels, who became the university's 14th president in March, worked part-time in December.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,liz.atwood@baltsun.com | March 2, 2009
Pancreatic cancer has been in the news recently. Last month, Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg underwent surgery to remove a malignant tumor from her pancreas. That same week, actor Patrick Swayze, who was diagnosed with the disease about a year ago, wrote a letter to Congress urging increased funding for research. The pancreas is a large organ that secretes enzymes that aid digestion and hormones that help regulate the metabolism of sugars. While cancer of the pancreas is not as common as other cancers, it is particularly virulent, says Dr. Armando Sardi, director of the Institute for Cancer Care and head of surgical oncology at Mercy Medical Center.
NEWS
By Glenn Graham and Glenn Graham,glenn.graham@baltsun.com | September 18, 2008
McDonogh junior midfielder Jake Weiner, who suffered a lacerated pancreas during a soccer game Saturday, remains at Johns Hopkins Hospital and is scheduled to have surgery today. Weiner initially had been scheduled to undergo surgery Tuesday afternoon, but the operation was postponed because of continued swelling. The procedure involves running a tube through his pancreatic duct so that the duct stays open to save the pancreas, according to Jake's mother, Jeannie Weiner. After Saturday's game against Perry Hall, Weiner was suffering from abdominal pain and went to the emergency room at Greater Baltimore Medical Center.
NEWS
By Glenn Graham and Glenn Graham,glenn.graham@baltsun.com | September 17, 2008
With a two-goal performance from sophomore forward Julian Griggs and an organized defensive effort throughout, the No. 4 McDonogh boys soccer team came away with a 3-0 win over host and No. 2 Mount St. Joseph yesterday. McDonogh, which was coming off Saturday's 2-1 upset loss to Perry Hall, improved to 3-1 overall and 2-0 in the Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association A Conference and handed the Gaels (3-1, 2-1) their first defeat. The Eagles dedicated the victory to teammate Jake Weiner, who underwent surgery yesterday at Johns Hopkins Hospital to repair a pancreas that was lacerated during Saturday's game.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2010
Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center has received a $20 million donation for pancreas cancer research and patient care, the largest donation for such research in its history. The award came from Albert P. "Skip" Viragh Jr., founder of Rockville-based Rydex Investment, a mutual fund investment company. Viragh, who died of the disease at 62, was a Hopkins patient. The money will fund the existing laboratory, expand clinical programs and contribute to new research at the newly named Skip Viragh Center for Pancreas Cancer Clinical Research and Patient Care.
FEATURES
By Gerri Kobren | April 16, 1991
Michael Landon's good humor last week as he announced to the press in California that he has advanced pancreatic cancer was an exhibition of extraordinary grace in a difficult situation.In fact, the prognosis in most cases of cancer of the pancreas is not encouraging: The vast majority of pancreatic tumors are known as adenocarcinomas, which rarely cause symptoms until they have passed the point of no return.Cure is rare, and survival time is more often measured in months than in years, according to Dr. Richard Kaplan, associate professor of oncology and medicine at the University of Maryland Oncology Center.
NEWS
By ASCRIBE NEWS SERVICE | April 8, 2001
PHILADELPHIA - Cells that develop into the liver can also give rise to part of the pancreas, according to researchers at the Fox Chase Cancer Center here. The finding counters the assumption that during the early stages of mammalian development, the liver and pancreas cells develop from separate lineages. Kenneth S. Zaret and his research team had originally been studying the development of the liver in mouse embryos and then discovered that the ventral part of the pancreas develops at the same time as the liver and from the same type of endoderm cells.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | May 4, 1997
NORFOLK, Va. - Researchers at Eastern Virginia Medical School believe they have isolated the gene that sparks rebirth of the cells that produce insulin, the hormone that diabetics lack - but need - to stay alive.The discovery could be a major advance in treating diabetes, a potentially fatal disease characterized by the inability to make or use the insulin vital to processing sugar and other carbohydrates.The findings also could help insulin-dependent diabetics say goodbye to daily shots of the hormone, said Aaron Vinik, leader ** of the research team at the EVMS Diabetes Institutes Foundation in Norfolk.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.