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By Joe Biden | November 24, 2013
In 1956, the world's first container ship, the Ideal X, sailed from New York harbor to the Port of Houston. Instead of sacks and crates stuffed in a musty hull, the ship carried 58 neatly packed containers on its deck. Shipping costs fell drastically and global commerce changed forever. A world of opportunity - and competition - had arrived. But American manufacturers were up to the challenge, thanks in part to the commitment of federal, state and local governments to build and maintain a world-class infrastructure that helped move their products and turn profits.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
Baltimore may lose hundreds of jobs, tens of millions of dollars in economic activity and half of the port's containerized cargo following the state's decision not to build a new rail cargo transfer facility in Morrell Park. State and port officials scrambled Friday to outline alternatives to shoring up Baltimore's place in the international shipping industry ahead of the widening of the Panama Canal and the anticipated growth in Asian container traffic on the East Coast. The rail facility was meant to bring Baltimore's limited freight capacity up to par with other East Coast ports by allowing CSX Transportation to stack truck-sized shipping containers two high on trains for more efficient transportation inland.
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NEWS
March 25, 2014
I don't know where commentator Gene E. Bigler got the idea that Panama is handling eight million containers "mostly to U.S. consumers this year" ( "Panama Canal expansion critical to the U.S.," March 18). The canal expansion project will have only a minor impact on existing container traffic to Baltimore from Asian nations. Traffic that originates in Hong Kong and ports to its south will continue to use Suez via Maersk Line and other carriers sailing container ships that are already too large to transit the new locks in Panama.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | July 7, 2014
At a time when the Republican Party needs a heavy dose of compromise to bring functionality back to government, one of its most admirable models of goodwill and working across the aisle has departed with the death at 88 last week of Howard Henry Baker Jr. of Tennessee. The state's first elected GOP senator, former Senate majority leader, Reagan White House chief of staff and presidential aspirant was a gentle throwback to the brand of moderate conservatism that got things done without breaking the china.
NEWS
By Robert McMillan | October 19, 1999
WITH the transfer of the Panama Canal to Panama scheduled for December 31, the canal's capacity will receive increased attention.Although 92 percent of the world's oceangoing vessels still are able to transit the waterway, the trend is clearly to larger ships. Only 82 percent of the vessels on today's drawing boards will be able to clear the canal's 1,000-by-110-foot locks.Will it be necessary to enlarge the canal? The answer really depends on whose shoes you are walking in. Putting nationalistic pride aside, the real issue is the price tag that must be paid for any enlargement.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2013
Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake plans to travel with Vice President Joe Biden to tour the Panama Canal expansion project next week, her office said Friday. The costs of the two-day trip will be covered by the federal government, the city said. Biden and Rawlings-Blake also plan to meet with Panama's president Ricardo Martinelli. Mayors Michael Nutter of Philadelphia and Kasim Reed of Atlanta also will be attending. Rawlings-Blake said it was "an extreme honor to be one of the few cities chosen" to get a close-up view of the work.
TRAVEL
By Mercury News | April 15, 2007
I'm interested in seeing the Panama Canal, but don't want to do a lengthy cruise. Are there any cruise lines that offer a segment of a cruise through the canal? Many cruise ships sail through the Panama Canal on repositioning cruises. They're typically headed from their Caribbean itineraries to Alaska, or vice versa. Some lines also offer 10-day Panama Canal sailings that start, for example, in San Juan, Puerto Rico, and end up in Acapulco, Mexico, then return. You might find a cruise line that would allow you to pick up a portion of such a cruise, but it would have to have available cabin space and would have to determine pricing before you left.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | March 3, 1999
Capt. Charles R. Stevens, former United States Lines marine superintendent in Baltimore and retired Panama Canal pilot, died Feb. 24 of kidney failure at Leesburg (Fla.) Regional Hospital. The former East Baltimore resident was 77.In 1943, when he was 22, Captain Stevens was the youngest American to hold a master's ticket -- or captain's license -- and, in 1949, when he was appointed port captain in Baltimore, he was again the nation's youngest.His responsibilities included supervising loading and unloading the company's vessels that docked in Baltimore, and he worked from an office on the Pennsylvania Railroad's Pier 11 in Canton.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | December 18, 1994
Q: Are there any boats that one can take locally to transit the Panama Canal? I truly want to make a canal passage but do not want to be involved in a seven- or 10-day cruise.A: The company that runs such trips, Argo Tours of Panama City, will soon be increasing their number from two to six a year.Starting Jan. 28 the 100-foot-long Islamorada, which holds up to 125 passengers, and the 500-passenger Fantasia del Mar will be operating every other month from Dock 17 in Balboa, on the Pacific, to Cristobal, on the Atlantic.
NEWS
December 27, 1999
THE HANDOVER of the Panama Canal to Panama at midday Friday will be a symbolic non-event along a smooth transition that has been taking place for two decades.Whether this is a good idea was hotly debated before the treaty was ratified by one vote in the Senate in 1978. Now, it is a done deal.The canal was started in 1881 by a French company that failed. The United States conspired to tear Panama from Colombia in 1903, in return for getting a 10-mile zone wherein the United States was effectively sovereign and would build the canal.
NEWS
March 25, 2014
I don't know where commentator Gene E. Bigler got the idea that Panama is handling eight million containers "mostly to U.S. consumers this year" ( "Panama Canal expansion critical to the U.S.," March 18). The canal expansion project will have only a minor impact on existing container traffic to Baltimore from Asian nations. Traffic that originates in Hong Kong and ports to its south will continue to use Suez via Maersk Line and other carriers sailing container ships that are already too large to transit the new locks in Panama.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2013
Virulent opposition among West Baltimore residents to a proposed CSX Transportation cargo facility in their neighborhood has raised more questions about the viability of the long-studied project. It also has disrupted key conversations on growth at the port of Baltimore and become a political football that local elected officials are finding difficult to handle. While Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake touted the project as a critical infrastructure investment ahead of next year's opening of an expanded Panama Canal, she's also begun hedging her support with more promises that residents won't be steamrolled in the process.
NEWS
By Joe Biden | November 24, 2013
In 1956, the world's first container ship, the Ideal X, sailed from New York harbor to the Port of Houston. Instead of sacks and crates stuffed in a musty hull, the ship carried 58 neatly packed containers on its deck. Shipping costs fell drastically and global commerce changed forever. A world of opportunity - and competition - had arrived. But American manufacturers were up to the challenge, thanks in part to the commitment of federal, state and local governments to build and maintain a world-class infrastructure that helped move their products and turn profits.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2013
After touring the expansion of the Panama Canal, Vice President Joe Biden and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said Tuesday they plan to increase their advocacy for a proposed CSX transfer station in Baltimore.  "You had [Panama] President [Ricardo] Martinelli saying, 'Look, any port on the East Coast that doesn't dredge to 50-feet deep, and does not expand the size of their dock and intermodel connections, they're going to lose out," Biden said in a telephone interview from Panama with The Baltimore Sun. "Baltimore is more ready than others," Biden said, citing the port's already-deep dredging.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2013
Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake plans to travel with Vice President Joe Biden to tour the Panama Canal expansion project next week, her office said Friday. The costs of the two-day trip will be covered by the federal government, the city said. Biden and Rawlings-Blake also plan to meet with Panama's president Ricardo Martinelli. Mayors Michael Nutter of Philadelphia and Kasim Reed of Atlanta also will be attending. Rawlings-Blake said it was "an extreme honor to be one of the few cities chosen" to get a close-up view of the work.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2013
Vice President Joe Biden will visit the Port of Baltimore today as part of a tour of East Coast ports seeking federal money to accommodate increased freight expected from the Panama Canal in coming years. The White House said last week Biden would add Baltimore to an earlier announced line up of visits to the ports of Savannah, Ga., and Charleston, S.C. Biden is scheduled later this month to visit Panama, where an expansion of the canal is expected to be completed in 2015. Biden's trip was announced days after the U.S. Department of Transportation awarded Baltimore a $10 million grant to build more access to rail, expand storage at Fairfield Marine Terminal, and help widen the channel at Seagirt Marine Terminal.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 30, 1999
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton will rebuff a personal appeal from the president of Panama and skip next month's politically freighted ceremony at which the United States will hand over control of the Panama Canal, administration officials said yesterday. The White House had been deeply divided between policy experts who implored Clinton to go and political advisers who feared that the image of the president turning over control of the canal would damage Clinton's would-be successor, Vice President Al Gore.
NEWS
By J. Thomas Sadowski | October 24, 2012
With each passing week, the Port of Baltimore, the region and the entire state of Maryland edge closer to an opportunity that will give our market a major advantage in the competition for jobs and economic development. The expansion of the Panama Canal, scheduled to be completed sometime in late 2014 or early 2015, will enable massive new cargo container ships to connect Asian markets to the East Coast of the United States. The Port of Baltimore is poised to be one of only two ports on the East Coast prepared to accommodate these new ships when the expanded canal opens.
NEWS
By Ted Venetoulis | March 6, 2012
Pot holes are not liberal or conservative. Nor are bridges, sewer lines, roads, airports or tunnels. They are our infrastructure. And much of it is deteriorating, in Maryland and across the nation. There is simply not enough money. At least, not enough public money. And so, most state governments simply put off the new construction and slow down the maintenance. This is what happened with the state's two crumbling travel plazas along Interstate 95. What to do? A recent example of a creative solution to the state's infrastructure problem is instructive.
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