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NEWS
June 13, 1992
At one level, Panama has recovered nicely since the United States' invasion of December 1989. The economy is growing rapidly. Bank deposits are rising. Some dent has been made in the debt inherited from the dictatorship of Manuel Noriega, so that the country is once again eligible for IMF credit. New high-rises alter the Panama City skyline. The Panama Canal is efficiently managed under the 1977 treaties; 1991 saw the second-highest tonnage in its history.But at another level, where most of the 2.5 million Panamanians live, the little country is a mess.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
Baltimore may lose hundreds of jobs, tens of millions of dollars in economic activity and half of the port's containerized cargo following the state's decision not to build a new rail cargo transfer facility in Morrell Park. State and port officials scrambled Friday to outline alternatives to shoring up Baltimore's place in the international shipping industry ahead of the widening of the Panama Canal and the anticipated growth in Asian container traffic on the East Coast. The rail facility was meant to bring Baltimore's limited freight capacity up to par with other East Coast ports by allowing CSX Transportation to stack truck-sized shipping containers two high on trains for more efficient transportation inland.
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NEWS
December 20, 1990
Tactical victory in the U.S. invasion of Panama one year ago today was swift and complete. Its political outcome is delayed and uncertain.The greatest indictment of the weakness of the democratically elected regime of President Guillermo Endara came from within. On Dec. 4, a former police chief, then in jail as a coup planner, broke out and with 35 followers advanced on the capital and seized police headquarters with hostages. The regime feared its own police would not put down the comic opera rising.
NEWS
March 25, 2014
I don't know where commentator Gene E. Bigler got the idea that Panama is handling eight million containers "mostly to U.S. consumers this year" ( "Panama Canal expansion critical to the U.S.," March 18). The canal expansion project will have only a minor impact on existing container traffic to Baltimore from Asian nations. Traffic that originates in Hong Kong and ports to its south will continue to use Suez via Maersk Line and other carriers sailing container ships that are already too large to transit the new locks in Panama.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | April 5, 2007
Imagine a picture-postcard expanse of blue ocean hugging a lagoon bursting with greenery, a tropical paradise populated by women in dresses shot through with color, and men who walk with the noble bearing of kings. It's a scene out of time that might have been painted by Gauguin, whose passionate embrace of Tahiti and its people more than a century ago helped launch the revolution that led to the birth of modern art. But Gauguin was an outsider to the idyllic society he portrayed -- a culture that, as it turned out, already had begun to fray under the pressure of advancing modernity.
NEWS
By Kenneth Freed and Kenneth Freed,Los Angeles Times | June 14, 1992
PANAMA CITY -- U.S. military and security agencies warned the White House more than a week early that President Bush faced serious danger if he carried out plans to speak at a public rally during his brief stop in Panama and urged that his appearance be canceled, U.S. and diplomatic sources say.fTC "Within 72 hours after Bush's staff told us he would be coming here, SouthCom [the U.S. military's Panama-based Southern Command] sent the Pentagon a 'trip book' saying the president should not speak [in public]
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | July 8, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Panama withdrew its promise of haven to 10,000 Haitian boat people yesterday, dealing an embarrassing new blow to President Clinton and increasing pressure for U.S. military action to remove Haiti's dictatorship and stem the exodus of refugees.The Clinton administration vowed to continue offering safety to refugees without Panama's help, while trying to keep more boat people from entering the United States.It won an agreement from Grenada to house some of them there, and officials said the tent city at the U.S. base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba,would be expanded beyond its capacity of 12,500.
NEWS
By Ed Brandt and Ed Brandt,Staff Writer | May 12, 1993
Baltimore County resident Jay Warren spent five months in the Republic of Panama last year, advising that country on how to deal with $30 billion in property it will receive from the United States at the end of this decade.In 1991, he happily spent two months in arid Bahrain, a Middle Eastern emirate on the Persian Gulf."Panama's problem is massive, and the clock is ticking," Mr. Warren said. "It could be great or it could be a debacle. Bahrain's situation is not as pressing, but just as serious."
BUSINESS
By Samantha Kappalman | November 2, 1997
In 1977, then President Jimmy Carter signed a treaty that returns the 900,000-acre Panama Canal Zone to the Panamanians on Dec. 31, 1999. Now, as that date approaches, the Panamanians are deciding what to do with the land.The Interoceanic Region Authority (ARI), custodian of the zone, with the help of the International Executive Service Corps (IESC), is trying to find businesses to buy the land. They held a conference last week at the National Aquarium in Baltimore to discuss the issue. Their hopes are for decreased unemployment and increased tourism and trade for Panama.
NEWS
By Newsday | December 20, 1990
PANAMA CITY, Panama -- At noontime the hot Panama sun cooks the fetid pools of mud in the vacant lots that were once the bustling slum of Chorillo. Outside the three high-rise cinder block buildings that survived the U.S. invasion, men sit idly, staring at the few cars that chance down the barren road.Across the street workmen race to complete three other U.S.-funded structures that will house some of the 1,800 people still living in a U.S. Air Force hangar a year after Panama City's poorest neighborhood was shattered by the Dec. 20, 1989, U.S. assault on Gen. Manuel Antonio Noriega's nearby headquarters.
NEWS
By Joe Biden | November 24, 2013
In 1956, the world's first container ship, the Ideal X, sailed from New York harbor to the Port of Houston. Instead of sacks and crates stuffed in a musty hull, the ship carried 58 neatly packed containers on its deck. Shipping costs fell drastically and global commerce changed forever. A world of opportunity - and competition - had arrived. But American manufacturers were up to the challenge, thanks in part to the commitment of federal, state and local governments to build and maintain a world-class infrastructure that helped move their products and turn profits.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2013
After touring the expansion of the Panama Canal, Vice President Joe Biden and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said Tuesday they plan to increase their advocacy for a proposed CSX transfer station in Baltimore.  "You had [Panama] President [Ricardo] Martinelli saying, 'Look, any port on the East Coast that doesn't dredge to 50-feet deep, and does not expand the size of their dock and intermodel connections, they're going to lose out," Biden said in a telephone interview from Panama with The Baltimore Sun. "Baltimore is more ready than others," Biden said, citing the port's already-deep dredging.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2013
Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake plans to travel with Vice President Joe Biden to tour the Panama Canal expansion project next week, her office said Friday. The costs of the two-day trip will be covered by the federal government, the city said. Biden and Rawlings-Blake also plan to meet with Panama's president Ricardo Martinelli. Mayors Michael Nutter of Philadelphia and Kasim Reed of Atlanta also will be attending. Rawlings-Blake said it was "an extreme honor to be one of the few cities chosen" to get a close-up view of the work.
BUSINESS
July 29, 2013
The United States has won the Gold Cup final against Panama. Welcome to your trends report for July 29, 2013. TRENDING NOW Gold Cup Final Where: Google Search Why: Panama failed to answer and the U.S. secured a 1-0 triumph and its fifth Gold Cup championship in front of a largely pro-USA Chicago crowd announced at 57,920. The Baltimore Sun Madrid Where: Twitter Why: Gareth Bale has been left distraught by the refusal of Daniel Levy, the Tottenham Hotspur chairman, to consider a world record €100m - £86.3m - offer from Real Madrid.
NEWS
By J. Thomas Sadowski | October 24, 2012
With each passing week, the Port of Baltimore, the region and the entire state of Maryland edge closer to an opportunity that will give our market a major advantage in the competition for jobs and economic development. The expansion of the Panama Canal, scheduled to be completed sometime in late 2014 or early 2015, will enable massive new cargo container ships to connect Asian markets to the East Coast of the United States. The Port of Baltimore is poised to be one of only two ports on the East Coast prepared to accommodate these new ships when the expanded canal opens.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Janell Sutherland | December 5, 2011
Remember last week? When there were waffles? And some cars and boats, but mostly waffles!? Now there are four teams racing to the finale, and this week I get to introduce you to the friendliest taxi drivers in the world. First, we must bid farewell to Atomium, the centerpiece of the 1958 World's Fair. The teams got to sleep in little pods inside Atomium, and that is basically awesome. Teams leave Atomium in the middle of the night with a box of costumes. They have to wear black suits, skinny ties, moustaches and bowler hats.
NEWS
December 23, 1996
FAST FORWARD to Dec. 31, 1999, the last day of the millennium for all but mathematics sticklers: As Americans prepare for a New Year's Eve of epochal proportions, President Clinton at the dot of high noon will turn the Panama Canal over to the Panamanians. This is decreed under terms of the 1977 treaty, and it will be one of the final acts of the Clinton presidency.Already the rumblings are shaking up the Central American scene and the world shipping industry. Panama's neighbors, never happy over the Yanqui presence, are torn.
NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | April 17, 1992
SOON AFTER I moved to Washington in 1975, among the first people I met, and immediately liked, was a charming and exceedingly bright woman named Adelaide Eisenmann from Panama. It soon turned out that Adelaide was far more than the retired social worker, plus committed Democratic Party activist, that she seemed."There has got to be democracy in Panama," she would say emphatically to carefully chosen interlocutors. "Since 1903, all patriotic Panamanians have desired a new canal treaty, but today's first concern is restoration of democracy and human rights."
EXPLORE
October 19, 2011
About 200 gift boxes, plus school supplies with backpacks, at least 40 little girl's dresses sewn by the ladies of the congregation, and medical supplies are being shipped from the Church of Christ, 90 Mount Royal Avenue in Aberdeen, to Panama. These gifts and supplies will be added to shipping containers that will have additional gifts from other Churches of Christ to enable the children of Panama to enjoy Christmas. Panama Mission is associated with the Churches of Christ, and overseen by the Childersburg, Ala., congregation.
NEWS
October 5, 2011
President Barack Obama's jobs bill, a relatively modest effort given the risks the economy faces and the toll that extended joblessness has taken on American workers, is bogged down in a divided Congress and is about to get more so. Senate leaders are moving to amend the plan to substitute a tax surcharge on millionaires for the provisions Mr. Obama had used to offset the bill's $447 billion cost. That's a perfectly sensible idea, given the massive tax benefits the rich have seen during the last decade, but it's even more dead on arrival in the Republican-controlled House of Representatives than Mr. Obama's initial plan, which relied on things like an end to tax breaks for oil companies and a smaller tax increase on families making more than $250,000 a year.
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