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Krishana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | December 8, 2013
Fifty years ago Sunday, mere days before the Christmas holiday, dozens of families from Elkton and north along the northeast corridor to Staten Island, N.Y., were changed in an instant. The mid-air explosion of Pan Am Flight 214 over Elkton became Maryland's largest loss-of-life disaster. The plane, a Boeing 707, returning from San Juan, Puerto Rico, made a stop in Baltimore to refuel before continuing to Philadelphia to drop off the last of its passengers. But, Pan Am Flight 214 never made it past Elkton.
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NEWS
Krishana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | December 8, 2013
Fifty years ago Sunday, mere days before the Christmas holiday, dozens of families from Elkton and north along the northeast corridor to Staten Island, N.Y., were changed in an instant. The mid-air explosion of Pan Am Flight 214 over Elkton became Maryland's largest loss-of-life disaster. The plane, a Boeing 707, returning from San Juan, Puerto Rico, made a stop in Baltimore to refuel before continuing to Philadelphia to drop off the last of its passengers. But, Pan Am Flight 214 never made it past Elkton.
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NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | December 21, 1993
Less than 48 hours after he got the news, Joe Horgan was flying toward a little farming village in Scotland.Christmas lights twinkled back home in North Wales, Pa.Ahead, the sun was rising on the still-smoldering wreck of a U.S. jumbo jet and 270 twisted bodies.Somewhere among them was his brother-in-law, Mike Doyle of Voorhees, Pa.On Dec. 21, 1988, Pan American Flight 103 had been en route to New York from Frankfurt, Germany, when a bomb exploded in its baggage compartment.Seconds later, and 31,000 feet below, the people of Lockerbie, Scotland, saw a V-shaped fireball tumbling out of the sky, then a "rain of fire" as wings and bodies and engines fell onto the houses and fields, killing 11 villagers in addition to the 259 people on board.
NEWS
August 25, 2009
Should Abdel Basset al-Megrahi, the terminally ill man convicted of bombing Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland, and killing 270 people in 1988, have been released from prison to die in Libya? Yes 6% No 92% Not sure 2% (1,094 votes, results not scientific) Next poll: : Should U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder appoint a prosecutor to investigate alleged abusive treatment of detainees by the CIA? Vote at baltimoresun.com/vote
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun reporter | August 19, 2007
A plaque on a firetruck at the Joppa-Magnolia Volunteer Fire Co. bears the name of an Army lieutenant killed nearly 20 years ago in a terrorist bombing in Scotland. The engine carries a new thermal-imaging camera, purchased with a $10,000 donation from George H. Williams. He gave the camera in memory of his only son, 1st Lt. George W. Williams, who died in 1988 aboard Pan Am Flight 103. Terrorist-planted bombs detonated on the plane over Lockerbie, killing all 259 people aboard and 11 others on the ground.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | April 9, 1999
Whenever George Williams feels like quitting, he pulls out an autopsy photo of his son who died in the bombing of Pan Am Flight 103.It is a painful reminder that his decadelong mission to unravel the mystery of the terrorist attack is not over."
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 16, 2003
WASHINGTON - Almost 15 years after Pan Am Flight 103 blew apart over Lockerbie, Scotland, Libya formally accepted responsibility yesterday for the bombing and readied a $2.7 billion deposit into a bank account for the victims. But while the deal would help Libya regain some standing on the world stage, the United States didn't plan to lift its economic and diplomatic sanctions against the country or remove it from the State Department's list of state sponsors of terrorism, a senior U.S. official said.
FEATURES
By Deborah Bach and Deborah Bach,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | May 1, 2000
George Harvey Williams is a hard man. His unflinching resolve is rooted in a Highlandtown childhood, was strengthened during the Depression years, and crystallized when he became a scout sniper for the Marine Corps during the Korean War. That determination has carried Williams through the past 11 1/2 years as he awaited justice for the death of his 24-year-old son in the bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland. It will be with him today as he flies to the Netherlands for the trial of two men charged in the attack that claimed 270 lives.
NEWS
August 25, 2009
Should Abdel Basset al-Megrahi, the terminally ill man convicted of bombing Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland, and killing 270 people in 1988, have been released from prison to die in Libya? Yes 6% No 92% Not sure 2% (1,094 votes, results not scientific) Next poll: : Should U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder appoint a prosecutor to investigate alleged abusive treatment of detainees by the CIA? Vote at baltimoresun.com/vote
NEWS
March 19, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The United States today urged Americans to leave Libya ahead of the expected imposition of sanctions by the United Nations Security Council against Libya. The sanctions are to be imposed until Libya cooperates in the prosecutions of two of its agents accused of bombing Pan Am Flight 103 in December 1988 over Lockerbie, Scotland, in which 270 people died, including seven Marylanders.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun reporter | August 19, 2007
A plaque on a firetruck at the Joppa-Magnolia Volunteer Fire Co. bears the name of an Army lieutenant killed nearly 20 years ago in a terrorist bombing in Scotland. The engine carries a new thermal-imaging camera, purchased with a $10,000 donation from George H. Williams. He gave the camera in memory of his only son, 1st Lt. George W. Williams, who died in 1988 aboard Pan Am Flight 103. Terrorist-planted bombs detonated on the plane over Lockerbie, killing all 259 people aboard and 11 others on the ground.
NEWS
By Tom Hundley and Tom Hundley,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 29, 2007
LONDON -- Nearly 19 years after a bomb blew up Pan Am Flight 103 in the skies above Lockerbie, Scotland, and six years after a former Libyan intelligence agent was convicted of planning the attack, a judicial review has resurrected lingering doubts about the case. The Scottish Criminal Cases Review Commission, an independent panel that oversees matters brought before Scottish courts, recommended yesterday that Abdel Basset Ali al-Megrahi, the only person convicted in the case, be granted permission to file a fresh appeal.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 16, 2003
WASHINGTON - Almost 15 years after Pan Am Flight 103 blew apart over Lockerbie, Scotland, Libya formally accepted responsibility yesterday for the bombing and readied a $2.7 billion deposit into a bank account for the victims. But while the deal would help Libya regain some standing on the world stage, the United States didn't plan to lift its economic and diplomatic sanctions against the country or remove it from the State Department's list of state sponsors of terrorism, a senior U.S. official said.
TOPIC
March 17, 2002
The Crisis: Four hundred U.S. soldiers returned to their base after commanders declared that the "major battle" against al-Qaida fighters in mountains south of Kabul was over. The bodies of at least 11 firefighters and numerous civilians were recovered when work crews began digging at the base of the first of the World Trade Center towers to collapse. A federal court in New Jersey indicted Ahmed Omar Saeed Sheikh, an Islamic militant and British passport holder. Saeed is accused of luring Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl to his death.
NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 21, 2000
WASHINGTON - Facing a Friday deadline, the State Department is poised to renew U.S.-Libyan travel restrictions for only several months instead of the full year allowed under law, angering relatives of those killed in the bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland, and amounting to what some see as a new step in warming U.S. relations with Libyan Col. Muammar el Kadafi. Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright is strongly considering a measure that would extend the travel restrictions on Americans in Libya for another three or six months, according to congressional aides and families of bombing victims who have been briefed by the department.
FEATURES
By Deborah Bach and Deborah Bach,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | May 1, 2000
George Harvey Williams is a hard man. His unflinching resolve is rooted in a Highlandtown childhood, was strengthened during the Depression years, and crystallized when he became a scout sniper for the Marine Corps during the Korean War. That determination has carried Williams through the past 11 1/2 years as he awaited justice for the death of his 24-year-old son in the bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland. It will be with him today as he flies to the Netherlands for the trial of two men charged in the attack that claimed 270 lives.
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