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NEWS
January 9, 2005
On January 7, 2005, CARLOS D. PALMA; beloved husband of Suzuko Palma; devoted father of Earl, Dean and Baron Palma;cherished brother of Evangeline Palma and Aurora Fidel. Friends may call at the family owned Evans Chapel of Memories - Parkville 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 PM Sunday. Services & Interment will be private.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By L'Oreal Thompson, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2013
Wedding date: Jan. 19, 2013 Her story: Palma Botterell, 31, grew up in Fairfax, Va. She is a graduate student at the University of Maryland's geochemistry program and a scientist with the U.S. Geological Survey. Her father, John, is a computer engineer and her mother, Stephanie, is a science teacher. His story: Kevin Jarboe, 32, grew up in Washington. He is a scientist for Lockheed Martin. His father, A.J., is a retired computer engineer and his mother, Karyn, is a cosmetics representative.
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NEWS
June 18, 2003
On June 16, 2003, FRANK JOHN PALMA, beloved husband of the late Florence Palma; loving father of Mary Palma. He is also survived by other family inMassachusetts. Interment is private. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to your favorite charity. Arrangements by Leonard J. Ruck, Inc.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2010
Baltimore might never be a club-going city like New York, Miami — or even Washington. For many reasons, only a few high-end lounges have been able to make it for the long haul in Charm City. Generally, they're run by people who understand what Baltimoreans want — and don't want — in a club. We hate pretentiousness, and are only willing to shell out for cover charges and expensive cocktails if we get our money's worth. The owners of Red Maple and Good Love understood this, which is why their businesses prospered.
NEWS
October 12, 2003
On October 9, 2003 PALMA Q. Friends may call at the FAMILY OWNED MARCH FUNERAL HOME WEST, INC., 4300 Wabash Avenue on Tuesday after 8:30 A.M. The family will receive friends on Wednesday at 6 P.M. at First Charity Baptist Church, 611 Aisquith St., followed by funeral service 7 P.M. See www.marchfh.com
NEWS
June 24, 2003
On June 22, 2003 PALMA MARIE CARR (nee Fasciana), beloved wife of the late George D. Carr; devoted mother of Jeanette Sayles, Palma Prasch, George Carr, Connie Buchwald and Chris Banach; sister of Nancy Keller and Lena Schilling; also survived by nine grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. Funeral Services will be held at the family owned Ruck Towson Funeral Home Inc., 1050 York Rd (Beltway exit 26A) on Wednesday at 11 A.M. Interment Gardens of Faith Cemetery. Friends may call Tuesday 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 P.M. Contributions may be made to the American Cancer Society, 8219 Town Center Dr., Baltimore MD 21236.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | August 7, 1992
After his epic failure in "The Bonfires of the Vanities," Brian De Palma has gone back to his roots, returned to what nurtured him, reclaimed his heritage. In other words, he's ripping off the corpse of Alfred Hitchcock again.Is this guy a ghoul or what? He belongs in a Charles Addams cartoon. He's like the guy in the old Nichols-May routine about a funeral counselor who offers funerals that cost $5,000, $3,000 and $29.95. When, after a pause, the bereaved Nichols asks grief-lady May what kind of a funeral could possibly cost twenty-nine ninety-five, she says, "A man comes and takes the body and does God knows what with it."
NEWS
By MICHAEL SRAGOW | December 24, 2006
THE BLACK DAHLIA -- Universal -- $29.98 In a ruthless one-two punch of Christmas week counter-programming, both of Tuesday's big new releases are macabre melodramas. By far the classier is Brian De Palma's The Black Dahlia, based on James Ellroy's fictionalization of the most famous unsolved murder in our criminal history. In 1946, Elizabeth Short, a would-be Hollywood starlet from Medford, Mass., was found disemboweled, cut in two, drained of blood, and with a smile carved into her face.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | August 7, 1992
After his epic failure in "The Bonfires of the Vanities," Brian De Palma has gone back to his roots, returned to what nurtured him, reclaimed his heritage. In other words, he's ripping off the corpse of Alfred Hitchcock again.Is this guy a ghoul or what? He belongs in a Charles Addams cartoon. He's like the guy in the old Nichols-May routine about a funeral counselor who offers funerals that cost $5,000, $3,000 and $29.95. When, after a pause, the bereaved Nichols asks grief-lady May what kind of a funeral could possibly cost twenty-nine ninety-five, she says, "A man comes and takes the body and does God knows what with it."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2010
Baltimore might never be a club-going city like New York, Miami — or even Washington. For many reasons, only a few high-end lounges have been able to make it for the long haul in Charm City. Generally, they're run by people who understand what Baltimoreans want — and don't want — in a club. We hate pretentiousness, and are only willing to shell out for cover charges and expensive cocktails if we get our money's worth. The owners of Red Maple and Good Love understood this, which is why their businesses prospered.
NEWS
By michael sragow and michael sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | November 14, 2008
Ken Tucker, Entertainment Weekly's editor-at-large and music critic for NPR's Fresh Air With Terry Gross, wasn't sure he had picked the right subject when he set out to chronicle Scarface Nation: The Ultimate Gangster Movie and How It Changed America (St. Martin's Press). "Scarface wasn't my favorite Brian De Palma movie," he says on the phone from his home in suburban Philadelphia. "I liked Blow Out a lot better." With Al Pacino acquiring a deep tan and adopting a Desi Arnaz accent as the Cuban-American drug lord Tony Montana, who believes that if you have guts in America "the World is Yours," the movie was treated, for my money with good reason, as a bloated, over-hyped event when it premiered in 1983.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,sam.sessa@baltsun.com | August 28, 2008
If you're going to open a high-end lounge or club in this city, do your homework first. Don't try to bring Washington to Baltimore. That doesn't work. If we want a swanky, expensive, pretentious Washington club, we'll go to Washington. Plenty of us already do. Want to charge a $10 cover? You better deliver. And if you want to keep your club full, you have to bombard Baltimore with fliers, ads, radio spots - especially at first. You'd think someone would do a little research before sinking millions into a high-end lounge.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | November 30, 2007
Brian De Palma's documentary-style fiction film Redacted is a bristling act of protest that obliterates a target it isn't aiming for. To research a factual Iraq war atrocity - U.S. soldiers rape and murder an innocent teenage girl, and slaughter most of her family - De Palma scoured soldiers' blogs and first-hand war videos, their Web sites and YouTube postings, then created his own pointed versions of them. The title refers to the way the news and government establishment erased the war's damage to Iraqis from the vision of most Americans, and the movie unfolds in a cutting-edge collage: a soldier's fly-on-the-wall digital footage combined with streaming video from American and insurgent Internet sites.
NEWS
By MICHAEL SRAGOW | December 24, 2006
THE BLACK DAHLIA -- Universal -- $29.98 In a ruthless one-two punch of Christmas week counter-programming, both of Tuesday's big new releases are macabre melodramas. By far the classier is Brian De Palma's The Black Dahlia, based on James Ellroy's fictionalization of the most famous unsolved murder in our criminal history. In 1946, Elizabeth Short, a would-be Hollywood starlet from Medford, Mass., was found disemboweled, cut in two, drained of blood, and with a smile carved into her face.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MICHAEL SRAGOW | October 1, 2006
SCARFACE Platinum Edition -- Universal / 29.98 BODY DOUBLE Special Edition --Sony / 19.98 Tuesday's most heavily promoted DVD reissue is Brian De Palma's 1983 Scarface (Universal), which already received a special edition three years ago. That one came with extras such as a documentary about the movie's influence on hip-hop personalities who view Al Pacino's Cuban refugee and Miami drug lord Tony Montana as a street hero. This "platinum edition" contains all the old features and three new ones targeted at the same audience.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | September 15, 2006
At one point in The Black Dahlia, the three leads - Josh Hartnett and Aaron Eckhart as hotshot detective pals in the L.A.P.D., and Scarlett Johansson as the woman they love - watch an improbable revival of Paul Leni's The Man Who Laughs, a mad silent-movie masterpiece. Adapted from Victor Hugo's novel, it derives a tingling romantic-masochistic allure from a man with a smile carved as punishment into his face. It's daring for director Brian De Palma to inject this movie into a pop entertainment; The Man Who Laughs, however great it is, remains a factor in mass culture only because Batman creator Bob Kane based the Joker on this woeful laughing man. The Black Dahlia (Universal)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and By Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | November 10, 2002
In thrillers from Carrie (1976) and Dressed to Kill (1980) to Snake Eyes (1998) and Femme Fatale, which opened in Baltimore Wednesday, director Brian De Palma has taken Carl Jung's definition of movies as his credo. "The cinema," Jung wrote, "makes it possible to experience without danger all the excitement, passion and desirousness which must be repressed in a humanitarian ordering of life." In Femme Fatale, De Palma reaches new peaks of "excitement, passion and desirousness." And he does so while analyzing the femme fatale -- the woman who seduces and kills -- with all the relish of Jung taking apart a favorite archetype.
NEWS
June 9, 2005
On June 7, 2005, LEONARD ANTONIO De PALMA, III of Abingdon, MD. Beloved husband of Diana Gale De Palma. Devoted father of Leonard Anthony De Palma, Jr., David De Palma, Vita Kencel and Debra Short and step-father of Daniel Sell and Diana Sell. Loving brother of Vita Grillo. Also survived by 10 grandchildren and three great-grandchildrn. A memorial service will be held in the family owned Mc Comas Funeral Home, P.A., Abingdon, MD on Saturday at 11:00 A.M. Friends may call at the funeral home in Abingdon on Thursday, June 9, 2005 from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 P.M. Those who desire may contribute to the American Heart Association Mid Atlantic Affiliate, Memorials and Tributes Processing Center, P.O. Box 5216, Glen Allen, VA 23058-5216.
NEWS
June 9, 2005
On June 7, 2005, LEONARD ANTONIO De PALMA, III of Abingdon, MD. Beloved husband of Diana Gale De Palma. Devoted father of Leonard Anthony De Palma, Jr., David De Palma, Vita Kencel and Debra Short and step-father of Daniel Sell and Diana Sell. Loving brother of Vita Grillo. Also survived by 10 grandchildren and three great-grandchildrn. A memorial service will be held in the family owned Mc Comas Funeral Home, P.A., Abingdon, MD on Saturday at 11:00 A.M. Friends may call at the funeral home in Abingdon on Thursday, June 9, 2005 from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 P.M. Those who desire may contribute to the American Heart Association Mid Atlantic Affiliate, Memorials and Tributes Processing Center, P.O. Box 5216, Glen Allen, VA 23058-5216.
NEWS
January 9, 2005
On January 7, 2005, CARLOS D. PALMA; beloved husband of Suzuko Palma; devoted father of Earl, Dean and Baron Palma;cherished brother of Evangeline Palma and Aurora Fidel. Friends may call at the family owned Evans Chapel of Memories - Parkville 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 PM Sunday. Services & Interment will be private.
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