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By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | November 15, 2000
It's a simple mistake made over and over again when reporters descend on Palm Beach County. Palm Beach. West Palm Beach. Same thing, right? Not since the 1991 rape trial of William Kennedy Smith have so many reporters confused West Palm Beach with Palm Beach. Both are in Palm Beach County. But it's like confusing Beverly Hills with Arbutus. West Palm Beach is not, in the words of out-of-town reporters, "a sleepy resort town." West Palm Beach is not "where all the rich people live."
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 22, 2006
MIAMI -- A renaissance is under way on Biscayne Boulevard, the central artery of downtown Miami, where derelict motels and strip malls are being tenderly restored and scruffy neighborhoods are striving for cachet. But a defining element is about to vanish: the royal palm trees that have lined the street for decades, making clear that this is not Hartford, Conn., or Detroit, but the otherworldly tropics. Along several miles of the street, the tall, trim royals are being replaced with bushier live oaks, which planners say will provide much-needed shade and beautify the heavily traveled street.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 22, 2006
MIAMI -- A renaissance is under way on Biscayne Boulevard, the central artery of downtown Miami, where derelict motels and strip malls are being tenderly restored and scruffy neighborhoods are striving for cachet. But a defining element is about to vanish: the royal palm trees that have lined the street for decades, making clear that this is not Hartford, Conn., or Detroit, but the otherworldly tropics. Along several miles of the street, the tall, trim royals are being replaced with bushier live oaks, which planners say will provide much-needed shade and beautify the heavily traveled street.
NEWS
By Mark Silva and Mark Silva,ORLANDO SENTINEL | April 20, 2004
LAKE WORTH, Fla. - The wreckage of Florida's 2000 presidential election remains a motivating force in the 2004 race, as Sen. John Kerry demonstrated when he campaigned yesterday in the county that spawned the infamous "butterfly ballot." "We can be angry. We can be frustrated." the presumptive Democratic nominee said yesterday at an outdoor rally on the campus of Palm Beach Community College. "But most importantly, we have the power ... to decide to do something about it." Kerry was accompanied by Connecticut Sen. Joseph I. Lieberman, the Democrats' vice presidential candidate in 2000.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | November 26, 2000
WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. - There was plenty of time to greet the guests who came in the morning. "You want to take a seat and see what's going on?" Palm Beach County Judge Charles Burton asked Christine Todd Whitman, the Republican governor of New Jersey. "We'll kick her out soon," he jokingly assured his colleagues on the county's canvassing board, which is under a tight deadline to finish a hand recount of 466,000 ballots cast nearly three weeks ago. But before nightfall yesterday, with Secretary of State Katherine Harris less than 24 hours from certifying the winner of the presidential contest in Florida, it was clearly crunch time.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 28, 2000
WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. - This is the spot they have religiously flocked to for days, with their ever-changing signs, their chants and bullhorns, their new chad-related T-shirt designs. But yesterday, there was no crowd of protesters outside Palm Beach County's Emergency Operations Center. Inside, the hand counting of the last 466,000 of Florida's presidential votes was over. Outside, so was the spectacle. "They say it put West Palm Beach on the map," Danny Meldrum, a 31-year-old waiter and Bush voter, said as he nursed a beer inside nearby Flanigan's Bar yesterday afternoon.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | November 16, 2000
WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. - There was the breakfast spread before 7 a.m.: bagels and Danish and bananas. Then they were fed and ready for a long day of counting Palm Beach County's 430,000 ballots - ballots that could mean the difference in one of the tightest presidential races in history. Another day, another day of confusion, another day of counting lost. The 50 people who volunteered for a week's worth of counting cards learned before 8 a.m. yesterday that there would be a delay: The county's Canvassing Board wouldn't start until a local judge determined whether they should count so-called "dimpled ballots," those that aren't punched all the way through but seem to show who a voter preferred.
NEWS
By Mark Silva and Mark Silva,ORLANDO SENTINEL | April 20, 2004
LAKE WORTH, Fla. - The wreckage of Florida's 2000 presidential election remains a motivating force in the 2004 race, as Sen. John Kerry demonstrated when he campaigned yesterday in the county that spawned the infamous "butterfly ballot." "We can be angry. We can be frustrated." the presumptive Democratic nominee said yesterday at an outdoor rally on the campus of Palm Beach Community College. "But most importantly, we have the power ... to decide to do something about it." Kerry was accompanied by Connecticut Sen. Joseph I. Lieberman, the Democrats' vice presidential candidate in 2000.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2004
WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. - More than three years later, Theresa LePore still gets hate mail. The Palm Beach County elections supervisor, who designed the butterfly ballot that confounded voters and might have contributed to Al Gore's razor-thin loss in 2000, recently received a voice-mail message from a former colleague. "He said, `You've got the blood of 500 American men and women on your hands. You are responsible for this war. You are responsible for 9/11. You don't even deserve to be in jail.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 27, 2000
WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. - The fax machine brought the news: An all-nighter, a strict diet of almond M&M's and bottled water, and a furious last gasp at trying to whip through the last dwindling stacks of Palm Beach County's 466,000 ballots wouldn't be enough to finish on time. The county canvassing board had pleaded with Secretary of State Katherine Harris earlier in the afternoon, asking for a few more hours to finish tallying by hand the county's votes for president, votes that were being counted with the help of hundreds of volunteers for 10 days.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2004
WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. - More than three years later, Theresa LePore still gets hate mail. The Palm Beach County elections supervisor, who designed the butterfly ballot that confounded voters and might have contributed to Al Gore's razor-thin loss in 2000, recently received a voice-mail message from a former colleague. "He said, `You've got the blood of 500 American men and women on your hands. You are responsible for this war. You are responsible for 9/11. You don't even deserve to be in jail.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 16, 2001
BOCA RATON, Fla. - In the place that made chads famous, Steven L. Abrams is settling in to his newly elected job as mayor, a hard-fought race he won this week with the help of some succinct advice to voters: "Don't leave me hanging." The message, which he mailed to thousands during his campaign, is one that reverberates throughout chad-crazy Palm Beach County, where Abrams and a host of other political candidates have zealously given supporters an education in how to cast a dimple-free, clearly punched ballot.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 28, 2000
WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. - This is the spot they have religiously flocked to for days, with their ever-changing signs, their chants and bullhorns, their new chad-related T-shirt designs. But yesterday, there was no crowd of protesters outside Palm Beach County's Emergency Operations Center. Inside, the hand counting of the last 466,000 of Florida's presidential votes was over. Outside, so was the spectacle. "They say it put West Palm Beach on the map," Danny Meldrum, a 31-year-old waiter and Bush voter, said as he nursed a beer inside nearby Flanigan's Bar yesterday afternoon.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 27, 2000
WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. - The fax machine brought the news: An all-nighter, a strict diet of almond M&M's and bottled water, and a furious last gasp at trying to whip through the last dwindling stacks of Palm Beach County's 466,000 ballots wouldn't be enough to finish on time. The county canvassing board had pleaded with Secretary of State Katherine Harris earlier in the afternoon, asking for a few more hours to finish tallying by hand the county's votes for president, votes that were being counted with the help of hundreds of volunteers for 10 days.
TOPIC
By Rich Hood | November 26, 2000
LAST YEAR, when the Kansas State Board of Education decided to de-emphasize the importance of teaching evolution in science classes, Kansas became the target of national and international derision. Never mind that many news media outlets misreported what the state board actually did -- it did not eliminate the teaching of evolution. Nor, as some media reports declared, did the board impose the teaching of creationism instead of science. Instead, the state board removed questions about evolution from statewide testing and permitted local school boards to determine for themselves how science curriculum would be taught.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | November 26, 2000
WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. - There was plenty of time to greet the guests who came in the morning. "You want to take a seat and see what's going on?" Palm Beach County Judge Charles Burton asked Christine Todd Whitman, the Republican governor of New Jersey. "We'll kick her out soon," he jokingly assured his colleagues on the county's canvassing board, which is under a tight deadline to finish a hand recount of 466,000 ballots cast nearly three weeks ago. But before nightfall yesterday, with Secretary of State Katherine Harris less than 24 hours from certifying the winner of the presidential contest in Florida, it was clearly crunch time.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 16, 2001
BOCA RATON, Fla. - In the place that made chads famous, Steven L. Abrams is settling in to his newly elected job as mayor, a hard-fought race he won this week with the help of some succinct advice to voters: "Don't leave me hanging." The message, which he mailed to thousands during his campaign, is one that reverberates throughout chad-crazy Palm Beach County, where Abrams and a host of other political candidates have zealously given supporters an education in how to cast a dimple-free, clearly punched ballot.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 14, 2000
WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. - Before this, the words "Palm Beach" probably conjured up two pictures: the sun-dappled playground of the very rich and gossip-column famous or the spot where every Jewish grandmother retired to play canasta with the girls. Now, it's being talked about as the home of the foolish voters who couldn't figure out how to punch their Election Day ballots. It's the place where the presidency could be at stake. It's the place undertaking a hand recount of 460,000 ballots, a tedious process the county Canvassing Board doesn't expect to finish until Sunday night, nearly two weeks after the votes were cast.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and Stephanie Desmon and David Nitkin and Stephanie Desmon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 26, 2000
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- Steamy South Florida grew hotter yesterday as ballot counters in Broward and Palm Beach counties sprinted toward today's 5 p.m. deadline for completing manual recounts of contested presidential ballots. As demonstrators faced off in the streets and national political leaders scrutinized ballot counters' work, canvassing board members in the two counties continued to try to determine the will of voters by examining tiny marks on punch ballots, sometimes using magnifying glasses.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | November 16, 2000
WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. - There was the breakfast spread before 7 a.m.: bagels and Danish and bananas. Then they were fed and ready for a long day of counting Palm Beach County's 430,000 ballots - ballots that could mean the difference in one of the tightest presidential races in history. Another day, another day of confusion, another day of counting lost. The 50 people who volunteered for a week's worth of counting cards learned before 8 a.m. yesterday that there would be a delay: The county's Canvassing Board wouldn't start until a local judge determined whether they should count so-called "dimpled ballots," those that aren't punched all the way through but seem to show who a voter preferred.
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