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By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | July 20, 2006
Judging by the number of imitators it has spawned, Artscape, Baltimore's annual outdoor arts festival that opens tomorrow, has been a raging success. As Artscape celebrates its 25th anniversary this year, there are at least three independently organized mini-festivals inspired by its example aimed at capitalizing on the huge crowds that descend on the city during the three-day event. Festivals: For a complete schedule of aLtskape events, directions and information on parking, visit baltimorerowhomes.
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By Samantha Iacia, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2013
Date: Aug. 10 Her story: Kimberly "Kimi" Reis, 29, grew up in Pigtown. She has worked in the dental field for 11 years and is a practice administrator at Elliott Family Dentistry in Linthicum. Her mother, Pam Reis, and grandparents, Bill and Shirley Reis, live in Pigtown. His story: Mario Soto, 28, grew up in South Baltimore. He is a longshoreman in Local 333 at the port of Baltimore. His father, Jimmy Soto, is also a longshoreman at the port. His mother, Kim Littman, is a dental hygienist.
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FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | July 7, 1996
We have a narrow and dark hallway. Can you tell us how to make it seem wider and brighter? We'd also like to add decorative interest so that guests will view the hall as something more than just a passageway between rooms.Color and lighting are obvious elements that make a setting look brighter and less confining. And to give your hallway a more interesting appearance, you should add an attractive pattern or two while also introducing a focal point.A pier mirror or a short cabinet with a tall mirror are two options-- assuming that the ceiling is more than 8 feet tall and that the hall isn't especially long.
FEATURES
October 17, 2012
What are the season's hottest colors, and how do you properly incorporate them into your home? My season's hottest colors are a deep turquoise peacock and gray. I love turquoise peacock. Right now, I'm working on a master bedroom of a young couple who are world travelers who have been everywhere, including Morocco. In their bedroom, they have a lot of oversized wood furniture. I'm doing a finish on the wall that is an Americanized plaster version of tadelakt — a Moroccan plaster technique.
FEATURES
By Catherine Cook | March 17, 1991
JUST A FEW SEASONS AGO, BLACK WAS THE COLOR OF COOL FOR ANY HIP KID, BUT NOW THAT TRENDY ADULTS ARE PLAYING AROUND WITH BOLD '60S COLOR MIXES, THE YOUTH SET IS REDISCOVERING THE JOYS OF THE PRIMARY PALETTE IT ONCE SO DISDAINED.
NEWS
By [Michael Dresser] | October 10, 2007
2006 Jermann Vinnae "Servus Cella" From: Venezia-Giulia, Italy Price: $36 Serve with: Hors d'oeuvres, light seafood At the price, this is rather an indulgence for a little-known Italian white - with a screw cap no less. But what a wine it is. Made primarily from the little-known Ribolla Gialla grape, this dry wine delivers a world of complexity. The palette of flavors includes minerals, nuts, lime, pine, smoke, sweet peas and pears. Its length and tanginess are exemplary. All of Jermann's white wines excel, but this is the best of this exceptional line.
NEWS
April 1, 2001
Makeup artist Sonia Kashuk delivers lots of versatility for a minimal investment with her line of cosmetics, called Professional Makeup. Designed to complement the dewy-fresh spring fashion palette, the collection consists of three clutter-busting "must-haves," (so designated by Kashuk). And combined, they cost about $30. Lip Palette Compacts are super-slender and have eight different shades of color, all sheer, with a lip balm included for extra shine ($15). Waterproof Enlighten Eye Cream (in shimmery shades of ice, topaz, steel and copper; $6)
NEWS
By Melissa Allison and By Melissa Allison,Special to the Sun | February 23, 2003
Shamrock is the color for 2003. It's the new yellow, which was retired in favor of a vivid yet vintage green that harks back to a gentler time, when jobs were plentiful and there were no code-orange alerts for homeland security. We're not talking about the latest trends on the catwalk. These are housewares colors, which have taken on increasing importance as consumers spend more time and money on their homes. People want their homes to reflect their personalities, and that means they want color choices beyond white, beige and almond.
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Special to The Evening Sun | December 12, 1991
Painter Sukey Bryan and photographer Susan Beard obviously approach their landscape subjects with different artistic implements in hand, but they have in common an emotional rather than purely representational attitude toward the land. They're currently sharing an exhibit titled "The Landscape Reviewed" at the Katzenstein Gallery.Bryan begins by going out into the Maryland countryside and photographing appealing sites. When she returns to her studio, these photos are but an inspirational point of departure for her paintings.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 17, 2004
Over the past 20 years Annapolis has grown into a center of American Impressionism. From the beginning, artist Lee Boynton has been a major participant, known for his ability to capture light in watercolor and oil. Boynton studied with American Impressionist Henry Hensche, who concentrated on color and light at his Cape Cod School of Art. In 1983 Boynton watched the 82-year-old artist paint still lifes in vivid color, describing Hensche as "creating sunlight...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2011
For nearly two centuries, the Maryland Institute College of Art has been known for training painters, sculptors and fashion designers. But in May, MICA broadened its course offerings, and it is preparing to confer its first master's degrees on about 200 students planning careers in fields ranging from engineering to public health to computer science. The next step: an MBA program that will start next fall and provide classroom instruction at both MICA and the Johns Hopkins University's Carey School of Business.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Lindner, Special To The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2011
If you sat down to a bowl of pasta named after a 19th-century post-Impressionist, would you expect a work of art? The Artful Gourmet Bistro in Owings Mills has the look and feel of a polite, mid-scale suburban chain with a taste that leans more on market savvy than daring. The restaurant's also apparently, and I think for good reason, a popular place to grab a quick or lingering lunch. But given blackened salmon on grilled focaccia, how does one arrive at Rembrandt? 12:10 We marched past the unattended host station and stopped at a short deli-style counter.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | June 28, 2009
Herman Maril had two worlds, and each provided him what something the other lacked. The artist, who was born in Baltimore in 1908 and died here in 1986, spent his life painting some of the grittier aspects of the city. Invariably, his astute and affectionate eye discovered the aesthetic appeal of even the homeliest objects. But for nearly every summer of Maril's adult life, he took his family to the beach in Provincetown, Mass., filling canvases with the ever-changing interplay of water and light.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,Sun reporter | May 26, 2008
Freedom David Colbert is prepared to die young, but not because he thinks he'll become a crime statistic in Baltimore. He says he's prepared to accept such a fate because it's the same one that has befallen so many young artists. A decade ago, he left the Baltimore School for the Arts, disillusioned with what he felt were the strictures of techniques being taught. Now that the 29-year-old is painting again, at a prolific pace, he says he understands the artistic destiny. "I would give my life for my art. That's what it means to me. It's my lifeline," said Colbert, who would only describe the style of his portraiture, landscapes and abstract work in oils and acrylics as "mine."
NEWS
By [Michael Dresser] | October 10, 2007
2006 Jermann Vinnae "Servus Cella" From: Venezia-Giulia, Italy Price: $36 Serve with: Hors d'oeuvres, light seafood At the price, this is rather an indulgence for a little-known Italian white - with a screw cap no less. But what a wine it is. Made primarily from the little-known Ribolla Gialla grape, this dry wine delivers a world of complexity. The palette of flavors includes minerals, nuts, lime, pine, smoke, sweet peas and pears. Its length and tanginess are exemplary. All of Jermann's white wines excel, but this is the best of this exceptional line.
FEATURES
By Tanika White and Tanika White,Sun reporter | September 12, 2007
New York-- --New York's Fashion Week -- the biannual presentations by the country's top designers -- ends today, wrapping up a style vision for spring that is both breezy and tailored, long and short, pale and bold, solid and printed. Designers showed a little bit of almost everything on their runways, giving shoppers many choices of spring styles to wear after a fall season of tights, shoe-boots and leather jackets. Looking for a decade to channel? Spring's got several. "I'm very excited about this spring because we've sort of got a change in silhouette, from all the baby doll and all the volume," says designer Rebecca Taylor, "to a more fitted and feminine look -- maybe slightly '40s inspired."
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 17, 2004
Over the past 20 years Annapolis has grown into a center of American Impressionism. From the beginning, artist Lee Boynton has been a major participant, known for his ability to capture light in watercolor and oil. Boynton studied with American Impressionist Henry Hensche, who concentrated on color and light at his Cape Cod School of Art. In 1983 Boynton watched the 82-year-old artist paint still lifes in vivid color, describing Hensche as "creating sunlight...
NEWS
By Claire Whitcomb and By Claire Whitcomb,Universal Press Syndicate | March 9, 2003
Reaching for a paint chip in the fluorescent light of your local hardware store, it's easy to forget that what you are actually selecting is a mood for your rooms. You're choosing between the joyfulness of citrus hues, the contemplative quality of earth tones, the serenity of sea green and aqua, the dynamism of persimmon and berry and rose. So it may pay to pause between paint chip and paint purchase and settle in with two new books that offer the most delicious sort of homework: an armchair journey to the heart of color.
NEWS
By Elaine Markoutsas and Elaine Markoutsas,Universal Press Syndicate | March 4, 2007
His shop is a hot destination on Kings Road in the heart of London's trendy Chelsea district. But British designer William Yeoward is considered a style-maker on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean. Yeoward's antiques and designs - in fabric, crystal, china, furniture and home accessories - always seem fresh. Whether it's color (often bold or unexpected combinations), pattern (familiar but edgy), texture, finish or form that make them special, his handcrafted pieces stand out in the design world.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,Special to The Sun | October 20, 2006
Wallace Farmer believes that a house should tell the story of who you are, and that it should always be "a surprise when you walk in the front door." That kind of personal imprint was something he always felt was missing from his condominium in Washington, where he works at the Library of Congress Copyright Office. Many trips to Baltimore convinced him that he needed to live in a more intimate city, filled with neighborhoods and history. In May, he bought a three-story brick rowhouse on North Fulton Avenue.
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