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NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 8, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq --- All of her life, Salwah Ziyadah has lived in Iraq as a stateless refugee, a stranger in her native land. Now the 41-year-old Palestinian woman, her elderly mother and four children face another kind of exile. They are being hounded to leave the home the family has lived in for the past 34 years. Not long ago, a classmate taunted Salwah's pale, stocky 17-year-old son, Yassir, at school. With Saddam Hussein gone, the Iraqi boy said, the Palestinians no longer had any right to be in Iraq.
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NEWS
By Richard Boudreaux and Richard Boudreaux,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 15, 2008
JERUSALEM -- Israeli and Palestinian negotiators began addressing the most difficult issues of their decades-old conflict yesterday, keeping a promise to President Bush but putting Israel's coalition government under strain. Israeli Foreign Minister Tzipi Livni and former Palestinian Authority Prime Minister Ahmed Qureia emerged from a two-hour session at a Jerusalem hotel with little to say about what they had discussed. Israeli officials said the two lead negotiators planned to meet at least once a week.
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NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 4, 1999
JERUSALEM -- The millennium could be the dawn of a new political era in the Middle East -- an independent Palestinian state, a Syrian flag flying again over the Golan Heights, a withdrawal of Israeli troops from South Lebanon, and an Israel at peace with all of its Arab neighbors.A pipe dream perhaps, but the Israeli leader who would be at the center of it is Prime Minister-elect Ehud Barak, a former commando intent on preserving Israel's security, a hawk on the issues central to a final peace deal with the Palestinians, and a political pragmatist with a military strategist's eye on how to get it all done.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | November 28, 2007
Excuse me? What was that I didn't hear? Journalists from around the world lined up early at Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium yesterday to attend the one-day Israeli-Palestinian peace conference in Annapolis. After getting credentials, the reporters were sent through metal detectors, guided onto a waiting bus, schlepped down to the U.S. Naval Academy and directed into a gymnasium where they could view the statements of President Bush, Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert and Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas on a giant screen.
TOPIC
By Phyllis Bennis | September 3, 2000
IN THE CROWDED, squalid Deheisha refugee camp near Bethlehem on the occupied West Bank, more than 11,000 Palestinians live in about one-half a square kilometer. Hundreds of Deheisha's children flock each day to the Ibda'a Cultural Center, where they exchange e-mail with children in other refugee camps, study art and music and play computer games, join a world-renowned dance troupe, and find intensive tutoring for their high school comprehensive exams. Ibda'a means "something from nothing" in Arabic.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 31, 2007
JERUSALEM -- A number of Palestinians who have fled war-torn Iraq will be allowed to come to live in the West Bank, Israeli officials said yesterday, presenting the decision as the latest in a series of gestures meant to bolster the moderate Palestinian president, Mahmoud Abbas. At the same time, the officials emphasized that the terms of entry will be designed to avoid setting any precedent regarding other Palestinian refugees of the 1948 Arab-Israeli war and their descendants and their long-standing claim of a right of return.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | March 28, 2007
JERUSALEM -- After three days of intensive diplomacy in the Middle East, U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice announced yesterday that the Israeli and Palestinian leaders have agreed to meet every two weeks to discuss day-to-day issues and "a political horizon." The agreement steps up the pace of face-to-face discussions between Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert and Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas, but falls well short of starting substantive negotiations on the core issues of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict.
NEWS
May 23, 2007
MARYLAND Six die in city rowhouse fire Six people were killed - some burned beyond recognition - and seven people were severely injured yesterday when a fire raged through an East Baltimore rowhouse in one of the deadliest fires in the city in recent years. pg 1a Mitchell to propose reforms City Councilman Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr., a candidate for mayor, will propose today reforms that would change the way the city awards contracts, including eliminating two mayoral appointees from the Board of Estimates.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 13, 2007
JERUSALEM -- King Abdullah II of Jordan will meet with Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas today in the West Bank in an attempt to push along Israeli-Palestinian talks about peace. It will be the king's first visit to the occupied territory, which Jordan ruled until 1967, in seven years. King Abdullah has been traveling the West and the region, urging Israel and the Palestinians to work toward solving their long dispute with the help of an Arab League initiative. He has been arguing that the conflict feeds extremism in the Muslim world and that time is running out before a new round of violence.
NEWS
By Noha el Hennawy and Megan K. Stack and Noha el Hennawy and Megan K. Stack,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 30, 2007
RIYADH, Saudi Arabia -- Arab rulers called on Israel to accept a peace plan that would normalize ties and put an end to the searing, decades-old Arab-Israeli conflict as the annual Arab summit drew to a close here yesterday. But both sides remained skeptical of the other's intentions. Calling for Israel to relinquish lands it captured in the 1967 war and for the long-elusive creation of a Palestinian state, the plan was flatly rejected by Israel when it was first unveiled in 2002. Even as they threw their political weight behind a push for peace, the rulers gathered in the Saudi capital sniped at Israel.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 31, 2007
JERUSALEM -- A number of Palestinians who have fled war-torn Iraq will be allowed to come to live in the West Bank, Israeli officials said yesterday, presenting the decision as the latest in a series of gestures meant to bolster the moderate Palestinian president, Mahmoud Abbas. At the same time, the officials emphasized that the terms of entry will be designed to avoid setting any precedent regarding other Palestinian refugees of the 1948 Arab-Israeli war and their descendants and their long-standing claim of a right of return.
NEWS
By Raed Rafei and Raed Rafei,Los Angeles Times | June 2, 2007
NAHR EL-BARED, Lebanon -- Government troops stormed positions held by al-Qaida-linked militants on the outskirts of this refugee camp in northern Lebanon yesterday, in some of the fiercest fighting in two weeks. At least 14 people, including two soldiers, were killed, according to security officials, who also said Lebanese forces moved against outlying paramilitary bases used by Fatah al-Islam militants without entering the camp itself. "Elite forces were able to take over a number of key posts that were used by snipers from group on the northern and eastern outskirts of the camp," a senior army official said on condition of anonymity.
NEWS
May 23, 2007
MARYLAND Six die in city rowhouse fire Six people were killed - some burned beyond recognition - and seven people were severely injured yesterday when a fire raged through an East Baltimore rowhouse in one of the deadliest fires in the city in recent years. pg 1a Mitchell to propose reforms City Councilman Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr., a candidate for mayor, will propose today reforms that would change the way the city awards contracts, including eliminating two mayoral appointees from the Board of Estimates.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 13, 2007
JERUSALEM -- King Abdullah II of Jordan will meet with Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas today in the West Bank in an attempt to push along Israeli-Palestinian talks about peace. It will be the king's first visit to the occupied territory, which Jordan ruled until 1967, in seven years. King Abdullah has been traveling the West and the region, urging Israel and the Palestinians to work toward solving their long dispute with the help of an Arab League initiative. He has been arguing that the conflict feeds extremism in the Muslim world and that time is running out before a new round of violence.
NEWS
By Noha el Hennawy and Megan K. Stack and Noha el Hennawy and Megan K. Stack,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 30, 2007
RIYADH, Saudi Arabia -- Arab rulers called on Israel to accept a peace plan that would normalize ties and put an end to the searing, decades-old Arab-Israeli conflict as the annual Arab summit drew to a close here yesterday. But both sides remained skeptical of the other's intentions. Calling for Israel to relinquish lands it captured in the 1967 war and for the long-elusive creation of a Palestinian state, the plan was flatly rejected by Israel when it was first unveiled in 2002. Even as they threw their political weight behind a push for peace, the rulers gathered in the Saudi capital sniped at Israel.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | March 28, 2007
JERUSALEM -- After three days of intensive diplomacy in the Middle East, U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice announced yesterday that the Israeli and Palestinian leaders have agreed to meet every two weeks to discuss day-to-day issues and "a political horizon." The agreement steps up the pace of face-to-face discussions between Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert and Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas, but falls well short of starting substantive negotiations on the core issues of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict.
TOPIC
By PHYLLIS BENNIS | July 30, 2000
President Clinton had called the negotiations "really, really hard." The trilateral statement issued jointly by the Palestinian, Israeli and American sides said the talks were "unprecedented in both scope and detail." But they failed - and that failure was no surprise. A truly comprehensive, permanent and just solution never seemed very likely, not even during the Camp David summit's moments of highest optimism. We don't know for sure whether serious agreements were in fact reached on crucial issues such as statehood, borders, settlements and water.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | November 28, 2007
Excuse me? What was that I didn't hear? Journalists from around the world lined up early at Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium yesterday to attend the one-day Israeli-Palestinian peace conference in Annapolis. After getting credentials, the reporters were sent through metal detectors, guided onto a waiting bus, schlepped down to the U.S. Naval Academy and directed into a gymnasium where they could view the statements of President Bush, Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert and Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas on a giant screen.
NEWS
By Fawaz A. Gerges | February 10, 2005
THE SUMMIT between Israeli and Palestinian leaders was a welcome first step in a long, complex and risky journey. Its importance is symbolic and psychological, not substantive, since the two parties could not agree on a joint declaration of a cease-fire or signatures on a document. They announced a de facto cease-fire instead. Major differences exist between the Palestinian and Israeli leadership on security and the political-diplomatic track. But the Israeli-Arab gathering this week in Egypt created a new momentum, and if concrete steps are taken, the dynamics of Palestinian-Israeli relations could change for the positive.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 9, 2005
SHARM EL-SHEIK, Egypt - Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon and Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas declared an end yesterday to "acts of violence" in the long-running Israeli-Palestinian conflict, in hopes that silencing the gunfire will lead to a formal, permanent peace. "We agreed with Prime Minister Sharon to cease all acts of violence against Israel and the Palestinians everywhere," Abbas said after meetings at this Red Sea resort with Sharon, Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak and Jordan's King Abdullah II. Sharon said immediately after Abbas' remarks: "Today, meeting with Chairman Abbas, we agreed that all Palestinians will stop acts of violence against all Israelis everywhere, and in parallel, Israel will cease all its military activity against all Palestinians anywhere."
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