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Palestinian Prisoners

NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Jerusalem Bureau of The Sun | July 2, 1995
JERUSALEM -- To Farah Raba Barghouti, peering at the world from one good eye and 65 hard years, the peace talks with Israel have done nothing to free her two grown sons from prison."
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NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 7, 1998
JERUSALEM -- Less than a week before President Clinton is to arrive to promote the land-for-security deal he brokered in October, the Middle East peace process is again in crisis, with disputes raging over the accord and his visit.Israeli and Palestinian leaders accused one another yesterday of lying about the terms of the Wye peace agreement, which was suspended last week by Israel. Hundreds of Palestinian prisoners joined a hunger strike to protest their detention by Israel.Several of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's Cabinet ministers called on Clinton to postpone his high-profile visit to Israel and the Palestinian areas, which is to begin Saturday.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 16, 2000
WASHINGTON - After more than three hours of talks with President Clinton, Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat emerged from the White House yesterday to question Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak's commitment to peace and to implore Clinton to assume a stronger role in the Middle East peace process. A meeting that was supposed to ease the Israeli and Palestinian leaders toward a Camp David-like peace summit this summer instead revealed new issues and fresh animosity. White House officials began downplaying any possibility of a summit in the near future, saying that they would work toward a lower-stakes meeting to advance negotiations that appear frozen.
NEWS
By JOHN MURPHY and JOHN MURPHY,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | July 4, 2006
JERUSALEM -- The deadline set by Palestinian militant groups holding an Israeli soldier for Israel to begin releasing Palestinian prisoners or "bear all the consequences" passed early today without any word on the fate of the 19-year-old captive. Abu Muthana, a spokesman for one of the Hamas-linked groups holding Cpl. Gilad Shalit, said that because Israel had ignored their deadline, the militants won't release any information about the soldier. He declined to say whether Shalit is alive.
NEWS
By James Ron | May 18, 2004
SINCE THE Iraq prison abuse scandal broke, commentators have focused on the question of responsibility. Was the abuse independently devised by individual guards? Was it ordered by superiors? If so, how highly placed were they? The New Yorker reported that Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld secretly authorized "physical coercion and sexual humiliation" against detainees. According to The New York Times, U.S. soldiers charged with abuse have told investigators that they were following orders.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 24, 1995
JERUSALEM -- Israel's foreign minister and the leader of the Palestinians sat down yesterday for what they said was the final drive for an agreement whose every paragraph and period has been the result of grueling struggle.Resuming talks after a 24-hour break for the Jewish Sabbath, Shimon Peres, the Israeli foreign minister, and Yasser Arafat, the Palestine Liberation Organization leader, expressed confidence that they could finish before the two-day Jewish New Year holiday, which begins at sundown today.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 14, 1998
JERUSALEM -- President Bill Clinton had some advice for both sides in the frayed Middle East peace process yesterday.He told the Palestinians they must "work harder" to uphold their end of the deal, and he urged the Israelis to remain on the road to peace because there is no alternative to a secure future.The president, on a three-day mission to salvage the stalled Israeli-Palestinian agreement he worked so hard to bring about in Maryland in October, spent his first full day in Israel assuring the Jewish state of America's enduring commitment to its security and applauding its efforts to pursue peace despite the %o difficulties.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Doug Struck and Dan Fesperman and Doug Struck,Jerusalem Bureau of The Sun | July 6, 1994
JERICHO, West Bank -- Yasser Arafat moved beyond celebrations and sentimental journeys yesterday to swear in his government and get down to the business of running the Palestinian territory. Already his agenda looks full.Mr. Arafat met with his new Cabinet to review plans to create jobs and build new housing in the impoverished Gaza Strip. Today, he ends his historic return to Palestinian territories and goes to Paris, where he will meet Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin to discuss ways to expand the territory under Palestinian governance.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 16, 1998
JERUSALEM -- When Nihad Zakout met President Clinton during his Middle East tour, the Palestinian schoolgirl made a tearful plea for the freedom of her father imprisoned a decade ago by Israel.She told him she wanted her father home. And she asked the president, "Can you live without your daughter for half a minute?""No," the president replied.What the 11-year-old didn't tell the president -- and what Clinton apparently didn't know -- was that her father, Mohammed, murdered an elderly Israeli scientist on his way home from delivering goods to the poor in the custom of the Jewish holiday of Purim.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 11, 2003
KUBER, West Bank - Twenty-five years ago, a Palestinian farmer named Fachri Barghouti murdered an Israeli bus driver, Mordechai Yekuel, stabbing him seven times in the chest. The killing led to Barghouti being sentenced to life imprisonment in Israel. That crime, in 1978, has long faded from public memory in a region traumatized by thousands of killings, whether by knives, rocks, suicide bombings or helicopter-fired missiles. But the possibility that Israel will release large numbers of Palestinian prisoners, as support for a U.S.-backed peace plan, is putting Israelis stricken by grief and Palestinians anxious for the return of jailed family members on a collision course that could derail a cease-fire, possibly the entire peace effort.
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