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By Michael Kelly and Michael Kelly,Special to The Sun | November 14, 1990
JERUSALEM -- Amid signs that the 3-year-old Palestinian uprising is spinning into a new and more murderous phase, several Palestinian leaders now say they have lost control of the movement's young street activists, whom they described as increasingly bent on killing Jews.And, in an admission that the situation has become, as one senior security official put it, "too much, too heavy," Israel ordered yesterday three of those same leaders jailed on charges of inciting violence against Israeli soldiers and civilians.
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2014
Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas met Monday with the teenager who allegedly was beaten by Israeli police last week, and Jewish leaders in Baltimore condemned the alleged abduction and killing of his cousin by several Israelis. In Israel, meanwhile, Hamas stepped up rocket fire at southern towns, and the government called up reserve troops in anticipation of a possible escalation of hostilities with the Islamist group that dominates the Gaza Strip. Relatives of 15-year-old Tariq Abu Khdeir, a Baltimore native who is visiting family in Israel with his parents and two younger sisters, say he was watching a protest leading up to the funeral of his cousin in East Jerusalem last Thursday when he was detained by Israeli police.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 30, 2007
JERUSALEM -- Mahmoud Abbas, the Palestinian Authority president, and Ehud Olmert, Israel's prime minister, will meet next week, their offices said yesterday, in a continuation of a Washington-sponsored dialogue that will inevitably focus on another round of Israeli-Palestinian warfare. In March, they promised Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice that they would meet every two weeks to discuss "a political horizon" for an Israeli-Palestinian settlement. They had met only once, on April 15, before a fierce new round of intra-Palestinian fighting in the Gaza Strip segued into a new barrage of rockets from Gaza into Israel, joined this time by Hamas, which has drawn the Israeli military into a new round of airstrikes.
NEWS
May 10, 2012
James W. Dale makes a welcome point in his commentary about the divestment campaign against Israel ("Choosing to stay engaged: Anti-Israel measures like divestment are not the best way to seek justice for Palestinians," May 4). It is, as he says, vital that mainline churches, including his own Presbyterian Church, understand that anti-Israel "divestment" campaigns render their proponents destructive and deny them a voice at the table. "Divestment" echoes both the Nazi boycott and impoverishment of German Jews and the Arab League's economic boycott of Israel.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 16, 2005
JERUSALEM - Prime Minister Ariel Sharon said yesterday that he had instructed his government to begin coordinating with Palestinian leaders on Israel's planned withdrawal from the Gaza Strip. Sharon, who a year ago announced his intention to pull all Israeli settlers out of Gaza unilaterally, insisting he had no Palestinian partner while Yasser Arafat remained alive, expressed eagerness to work with Arafat's successor, Mahmoud Abbas, on returning Gaza to Palestinian control. Arafat died in November.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 4, 2002
CAIRO, Egypt - Egypt, Israel's largest and most important peace partner, downgraded its relations with the Israelis yesterday in a pointed warning that the intensifying war against the Palestinian Authority of Yasser Arafat was ratcheting up Arab resentment to dangerous levels. The Egyptian government said it was suspending "all contacts" with the Israeli government, but that it would keep open a diplomatic channel to deal with the crisis in the West Bank. The decision fell short of formally breaking the ties established in 1979 by Egyptian President Anwar Sadat and Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin, and was intended as much to placate rising frustration among the Egyptian public as to signal its own anger over the widening Israeli military campaign.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 18, 2003
GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip - The American-led peace plan showed signs of reviving slightly yesterday, as Palestinian officials said they were nearing a cease-fire agreement with militant groups, including Hamas, responsible for the greatest number of suicide attacks against Israelis. Without such an agreement, most experts agree, the peace plan introduced by President Bush two weeks ago has little chance. Yesterday, even Hamas signaled its willingness to end attacks on civilians, at least temporarily.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 19, 2003
HERZLIYA, Israel - Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon gave Palestinian leaders an ultimatum last night - either they stop violence and return to negotiations or Israel will take steps on its own to "disengage" and declare a provisional border. Under Sharon's plan, the Israeli army would take its troops out of land ceded to the Palestinians and deploy them to an Israeli-declared dividing line along the West Bank. Palestinians would receive far less land under the plan than the United States envisioned under its peace plan, the "road map."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 30, 1999
JERUSALEM -- Palestinian leaders decided yesterday against declaring statehood Tuesday, retreating from a pledge that the Israelis saw as a threat and defusing a potentially volatile situation.At the urging of Yasser Arafat, the Palestinian leader, the Palestinian Central Council ended a three-day meeting in Gaza City by postponing the idea of pronouncing the West Bank and Gaza Strip a Palestinian state.Under the terms of the Oslo peace accord, Tuesday was the target date for completing final peace negotiations between the Israelis and the Palestinians, but the negotiations have barely begun.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 6, 1992
JERUSALEM -- Israeli negotiators headed yesterday night for another round of Middle East peace talks as senior officials here predicted that Arab delegations would also journey to Washington before long despite having delayed their travels to protest Israel's planned expulsion of 12 Palestinians from its occupied territories."
NEWS
September 26, 2011
The Sun reports ("Bid for statehood may end; Possible deal delays U.N. debate, retains aid to Palestinians," September 21) that Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas "decided to approach the U.N. this year [for statehood recognition] because of his frustration that after nearly two decades of U.S.-led negotiations, the long-promised separate Palestinian state had not materialized. " That's one way of putting it, but it's Palestinian spin. It's Palestinian rejectionism that has frustrated U.S. diplomacy.
NEWS
May 23, 2011
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu must have known how disingenuous he sounded when he professed to be shocked — just shocked! — by President Obama's call on Thursday for a resumption of Israel-Palestinian peace talks based on Israel's 1967 boundaries. That's been the unstated premise for every American-brokered attempt since 1993 to bring about a two-state solution in which Israelis and Palestinians live side by side in peace. For Mr. Netanyahu to wax indignant over Mr. Obama's reference to the 1967 lines as a starting point for negotiations appears only to confirm suspicions that the current Israeli government isn't really serious about making peace on any terms.
NEWS
May 23, 2011
President Obama was right to stick by his call for Israel’s 1967 boundaries as a starting point for peace negotiations with the Palestinians, in the face of an outsized reaction from Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. The statement made in the president’s Thursday speech on the political upheaval in the Middle East was not nearly so earth shaking as Mr. Netanyahu and Israel’s other supposed friends have made it out to be. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has publicly said the same thing, and the lines established prior to the 1967 war have been the de facto basis for all of the recent efforts at reconciliation and establishment of a Palestinian state.
NEWS
By Jennifer Laszlo Mizrahi | March 28, 2011
News of last week's terrorist bombing near Jerusalem's central bus station that killed one woman and injured 30 people reawakened traumatic memories of the dark days in Israel between 2001-2004 when bombs exploded regularly in Israel's buses, cafes and streets, killing more than 1,000 innocent people. Those relentless attacks during the second "intifada" were the reason — the only reason — that the Israeli government built its security fence: to end terrorist bombings and protect its citizens.
NEWS
August 31, 2010
With the departure of the last American combat troops from Iraq, President Barack Obama will tell the nation tonight that he is keeping his pledge to essentially end U.S. involvement in that long and bloody war, and that his administration remains committed to bringing home the 50,000 American troops still there by the end of 2011. But if concluding the war in Iraq — and, eventually, the more difficult fight in Afghanistan — is a daunting prospect, the difficulty it presents is eclipsed by the challenge Mr. Obama will take up Thursday, one that has vexed presidents going back four decades now: achieving lasting peace between the Israelis and the Palestinians.
NEWS
February 12, 2009
Israeli voters' preference for hard-liners has left foreign minister and moderate Tzipi Livni in the unenviable position of having won but lost at the same time. With most votes counted, Ms. Livni, the leader of the center-right Kadima party, posted a one-vote win over the rival Likud leader, Benjamin Netanyahu, in parliamentary elections Tuesday. And yet a strong finish by a third party of ultra-nationalists has seriously undermined her chances at forming a government. This embrace of the political right will complicate the United States' efforts to restart meaningful peace talks with the Palestinians.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 16, 2002
JERUSALEM - Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat sought to unequivocally distance himself from the terror network al-Qaida in an interview published yesterday, warning Osama bin Laden to stop justifying attacks in the name of Palestinians. "I'm telling him directly not to hide behind the Palestinian cause," Arafat was quoted as saying in The Sunday Times of London, referring to recent statements by al-Qaida leaders. "Why is bin Laden talking about Palestine now?" Arafat said in the article.
NEWS
By Richard Boudreaux and Richard Boudreaux,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 26, 2007
JERUSALEM -- Ehud Olmert and Mahmoud Abbas have spent more time alone together than any previous pair of Israeli and Palestinian leaders. They have sat for hours, in 12 meetings over the past 11 months, sharing pictures of their grandchildren and talking about a world in which those kids can grow up in peace. Smoke fills Olmert's study as Abbas, puffing on Marlboro Reds, describes the crushing burden of Israeli occupation in the West Bank. The Israeli prime minister lights up a cigar, lecturing his guest on the need to stop Palestinian militias from plotting against his people.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN REPORTER | November 22, 2007
While Bush administration officials have been doing all they can to dampen expectations for next week's Mideast meeting in Annapolis -- even warning reporters not to call it a "peace conference" -- Jewish and Muslim leaders in Maryland apparently did not get the message. In interviews this week, rabbis, imams and others expressed hope that real progress can be made in Annapolis, saying it would be a shame to squander such a rare opportunity -- having representatives from Israel, the United States and many Arab states at the same table.
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