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NEWS
By Ken Ellingwood and Ken Ellingwood,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 16, 2007
JERUSALEM -- Israel declared yesterday that it would not deal with the newly named Palestinian government, saying the proposed coalition showed no sign of recognizing the Jewish state or meeting other international conditions for ending an aid embargo. Israeli officials said the draft platform for the new government, under which the radical Islamist group Hamas will share power with rival Fatah, appeared to maintain the hard-line stance of the current government, which has been run solely by Hamas.
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NEWS
By Jim Hecht | August 13, 2013
Secretary of State John Kerry has accomplished what many Middle East experts felt was not possible. As a result of his hard work and skill, Israelis and Palestinians are scheduled to resume negotiations on resolving their decades-long conflict in Jerusalem Wednesday. It is not surprising that Mr. Kerry has given the Israeli-Palestinian conflict a high priority. Like all of his recent predecessors as secretary of state, as well as past national security advisers, Mr. Kerry understands what most Americans do not - that ending the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is of great importance to U.S. national security.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 14, 2007
JERUSALEM -- The emergency Palestinian government led by Salam Fayyad stepped down yesterday to be replaced by a caretaker Palestinian government led by - Salam Fayyad. The new government is exactly like the old one, with a few more ministers. But it will have an indefinite mandate as long as the current Palestinian parliament is unable to form a quorum. The move was required because the emergency Cabinet, named by President Mahmoud Abbas of Fatah, after he fired the government led by Prime Minister Ismail Haniya of Hamas, could legally last for only 30 days unless the parliament ratified it. But when Abbas called a session of the parliament, Hamas boycotted it, preventing a quorum.
NEWS
December 19, 2007
Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice was as successful in passing the hat for the Palestinians this week as she was in persuading reluctant Arab leaders to attend last month's peace summit. She had to be because the limited progress made at the Annapolis meeting isn't going to be enough to sustain peace talks between Israel and the Palestinian Authority without improvements in the daily lives of its citizens. That's what the $7.4 billion in aid pledged by about 90 countries and international organizations could potentially secure for the million or more Palestinians living in the West Bank.
NEWS
By LAURA KING and LAURA KING,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 19, 2006
JERUSALEM -- Hamas announced yesterday that it had formed a Palestinian government but acknowledged that it had been unable to attract coalition partners whose presence might have made dealings with the Islamist group more palatable to the outside world. The group refrained from formally announcing its Cabinet lineup, pending its presentation to Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas, who was expected to travel to the Gaza Strip today for meetings with the Hamas leadership. Hamas officials speaking on condition of anonymity said that key positions would go to Hamas loyalists, such as firebrand Mahmoud Zahar, who has been designated foreign minister.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 11, 2006
GAZA CITY, GAZA STRIP -- Hamas committed yesterday to folding its eight-month government if that would restore the international assistance that was cut off after it won national elections earlier this year. In a speech, the Hamas prime minister, Ismail Haniyeh, said he would likely resign in the next "two or three weeks" to make way for a national unity government more acceptable to international donors than Hamas, the organization responsible for the deadliest attacks against Israel.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 8, 2003
RAMALLAH, West Bank - Looking frail and tired, Yasser Arafat swore in an emergency Palestinian government yesterday in an effort to counter growing Israeli pressure against him and the Palestinian Authority. The new government is led by Prime Minister Ahmed Qureia, but critics warned that the emergency action created expectations that cannot be met, such as that the new government will disarm militant groups, including Hamas and Islamic Jihad. "It is a grave mistake to declare a state of emergency," said Ali Jarbawi, a political scientist at Birzeit University, noting the failure of the previous government of Mahmoud Abbas, who resigned last month.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 7, 2006
JERUSALEM --Israel will continue to cooperate with the Palestinian Authority and its interim government as long as Hamas is not represented there, the acting prime minister, Ehud Olmert, said yesterday. He said Israel would cooperate with the Palestinian president, Mahmoud Abbas, known as Abu Mazen, whose position is not directly affected by the sweeping victory of Hamas in Palestinian legislative elections. "I have no interest in harming Palestinian Authority Chairman Abu Mazen as long as he doesn't cooperate with Hamas and as long as the Palestinian government isn't led by Hamas," Olmert said.
NEWS
By LAURA KING and LAURA KING,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 6, 2006
GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip -- The new Hamas-led Palestinian Authority is out of money and has missed its April 1 monthly payroll for tens of thousands of Palestinian public workers, Prime Minister Ismail Haniyeh said yesterday. It was Hamas' first admission that it will have difficulty running the West Bank and Gaza without significant help from other countries. Up to one-third of the Palestinian population is supported by government paychecks, and international organizations including the World Bank have warned that chaos could result if the Palestinian government cannot pay its bureaucrats and security forces.
NEWS
By LAURA KING and LAURA KING,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 11, 2006
JERUSALEM -- Israel said yesterday that it would accept a decision by international mediators to provide humanitarian aid to the Palestinians, provided the funds do not fall into the hands of the Hamas-led government. The so-called Quartet, consisting of the United States, the European Union, the United Nations and Russia, agreed a day earlier on a temporary mechanism for helping the cash-strapped Palestinian Authority to pay for urgently needed humanitarian needs such as medical supplies and other goods and services.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 14, 2007
JERUSALEM -- The emergency Palestinian government led by Salam Fayyad stepped down yesterday to be replaced by a caretaker Palestinian government led by - Salam Fayyad. The new government is exactly like the old one, with a few more ministers. But it will have an indefinite mandate as long as the current Palestinian parliament is unable to form a quorum. The move was required because the emergency Cabinet, named by President Mahmoud Abbas of Fatah, after he fired the government led by Prime Minister Ismail Haniya of Hamas, could legally last for only 30 days unless the parliament ratified it. But when Abbas called a session of the parliament, Hamas boycotted it, preventing a quorum.
NEWS
By James Gerstenzang and James Gerstenzang,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 19, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The Bush administration moved quickly yesterday to help Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas consolidate his hold on the West Bank, renewing millions of dollars of aid that will be parceled out by his Fatah-led government. In an effort to work around Abbas' militant Hamas rivals who now control the Gaza Strip, the administration will make additional money available through the United Nations for refugee relief, mainly for the 1.5 million Palestinians who inhabit the troubled coastal strip.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,Sun Foreign Reporter | June 16, 2007
JERUSALEM -- After Hamas' swift and humiliating defeat of rival Fatah forces in the Gaza Strip this week, Fatah leader Mahmoud Abbas woke up yesterday as president of a broken kingdom with his reputation seemingly sealed as weak and ineffective. "A featherless chick," one commentator in the Israeli newspaper Ma'ariv dubbed Abbas after his military failure against Hamas. Even so, as Israeli and U.S. officials tried to navigate the realities created by Hamas' victory, they pointed to Abbas as the key player in their efforts to back Palestinian moderates, sideline Hamas and perhaps save their failed plans to create a Palestinian state.
NEWS
By Rushdi abu Alouf and Richard Boudreaux and Rushdi abu Alouf and Richard Boudreaux,Los Angeles Times | June 15, 2007
GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip -- Hamas gunmen seized military control of the Gaza Strip yesterday, executing Fatah rivals and provoking the collapse of their power-sharing government. As Fatah's last security command centers fell after four days of fighting, Hamas military men in black masks moved unchallenged across Gaza City, hunting down foes, blowing up homes and dragging the body of a top Fatah militant through the streets. Hamas fighters marched humiliated agents of the once-feared Preventive Security Service out of their headquarters in handcuffs and stripped to the waist.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo | May 19, 2007
As they traveled from one Capitol Hill office to the next, Tom Garofalo and his colleagues from Catholic Relief Services made their pitch: Humanitarian aid to impoverished Palestinians in the West Bank and Gaza must feed more than hungry bodies. It must nourish minds and spirits if peace is the goal, and classrooms would be a logical place to start. But at the mention of schools, one congressional staffer stopped them: We can't do that; the Palestinian government teaches hate. It's a reaction that relief workers have faced as they try to do their jobs without running afoul of U.S. policy that prohibits assistance to the Palestinian Authority.
NEWS
By Ken Ellingwood and Ken Ellingwood,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 16, 2007
JERUSALEM -- Israel declared yesterday that it would not deal with the newly named Palestinian government, saying the proposed coalition showed no sign of recognizing the Jewish state or meeting other international conditions for ending an aid embargo. Israeli officials said the draft platform for the new government, under which the radical Islamist group Hamas will share power with rival Fatah, appeared to maintain the hard-line stance of the current government, which has been run solely by Hamas.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 22, 2006
GAZA CITY -- Israeli tanks pulled out of the Maghazi refugee camp in the central Gaza Strip yesterday and withdrew to Israeli territory, ending a two-day incursion that left at least 15 Palestinians dead. Sporadic shelling continued in the north section of the Gaza Strip. Palestinian Prime Minister Ismail Haniya condemned Israel and the U.S. in a sermon before Friday prayers, his most extensive public comments for more than two weeks. Haniya called the Israeli military offensives in Gaza and Lebanon an attempt to establish regional dominance under the pretext of rescuing kidnapped soldiers.
NEWS
By KEN ELLINGWOOD and KEN ELLINGWOOD,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 22, 2006
JERUSALEM -- Israel said yesterday that it would release about $11 million in Palestinian tax money that it has been holding and allow the funds to be used for medicine and equipment for Palestinian hospitals while bypassing the Hamas-led government. The decision came against a backdrop of severe economic and humanitarian problems in the Gaza Strip and tensions between Palestinian factions that some believe could ignite civil war. Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas sought to cool tempers yesterday, but security officials said they found a bomb in the road near the home of one of his top aides, Rashid Abu Shbak.
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | March 6, 2007
TEL AVIV, Israel -- A year-old international campaign to isolate the Hamas-led Palestinian government unintentionally has pushed the militant Islamic group into a dangerous and growing alliance with Iran, Israel's top internal-intelligence chief said yesterday. Yuval Diskin, the director of Israel's Shin Bet security agency, said closer ties between Hamas and Iran were one of the "bad fruits" of a U.S.- and Israeli-led economic boycott of the Palestinian government. The boycott gave Iran an opportunity to give Hamas millions of dollars in aid and military training as part of a campaign to destabilize Israel and the Middle East, Diskin said.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,Sun Foreign Reporter | February 17, 2007
JERUSALEM -- Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice arrives in Jerusalem today for peace talks aimed at jump-starting the Bush administration's long-dormant efforts toward creating a Palestinian state alongside Israel. Her meeting Monday with Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert and Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas is the beginning of a new, concerted effort by the administration to develop what Rice describes as "a clear political horizon for the Palestinian people." Instead of concentrating on short-term objectives with troublesome sticking points - such as ending Palestinian violence or halting settlement construction - Rice plans to focus on the end goal: what it will take to create a viable Palestinian state.
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