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By Ann Owens Gilliland | October 14, 1990
Nobody ends up in Palau by accident.It's not on the way to anyplace. It has no great museum of art. No Eiffel Tower. No Roman Colosseum or Westminster Abbey.It's even hard to find on a map, since locally it's called Belau. Lying about 700 miles southwest of Guam west of Micronesia, this tropical chain of islands seems to be in the heart of nowhere.The U.S. Marines of World War II know about it. In a brutal battle, the 1st Marine Division stormed the beach on Sept. 15, 1944 -- and was virtually wiped out -- down at Peleliu, one of Palau's southwesternmost islands.
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NEWS
June 20, 2007
William Eaton Perryclear Sr., former worm farm owner and museum curator, died of esophageal cancer Monday at Anne Arundel Medical Center. The Annapolis resident was 66. Mr. Perryclear was born in Pittsburgh and raised in Govans and Roland Park. He was a 1958 graduate of City College and earned a bachelor's degree in English literature in 1962 from Washington and Jefferson College in Washington, Pa. Mr. Perryclear was an insurance agent from 1962 until 1975, when he moved to Delta, Pa., and established William & Mary Enterprises, a worm and organic soil farm.
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FEATURES
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 26, 2005
BARCELONA -- This city's celebrated concert hall, Palau de la Musica Catalana, isn't just over the top. It's over the top of the top. A cross between a baroque cathedral and an art nouveaux ornament factory, this grand building, designed by modernist architect Lluis Domenech i Montaner and completed in 1908, doesn't have an undecorated millimeter of space. The stained-glass dome in the ceiling, like a Tiffany lamp on steroids, is framed by ceramic roses that also adorn other nooks and crannies.
FEATURES
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 26, 2005
BARCELONA -- This city's celebrated concert hall, Palau de la Musica Catalana, isn't just over the top. It's over the top of the top. A cross between a baroque cathedral and an art nouveaux ornament factory, this grand building, designed by modernist architect Lluis Domenech i Montaner and completed in 1908, doesn't have an undecorated millimeter of space. The stained-glass dome in the ceiling, like a Tiffany lamp on steroids, is framed by ceramic roses that also adorn other nooks and crannies.
NEWS
By Christian Science Monitor | September 30, 1994
KOROR, Palau -- A traditional Micronesian steam bath for a woman about to give birth will open today two days of ceremonies marking the independence of the Republic of Palau, a tiny Pacific island-state with a population of 15,000.The ceremonies end the last United Nations trusteeship and more than a decade of nominal self-government overseen by the U.S. Department of Interior.While Palau's neighbors -- the Federated States of Micronesia and the Republic of the Marshall Islands -- achieved independence in 1986, and the Northern Marianas chose to become a commonwealth of the United States, Palauans have engaged in an internal struggle over their status since 1981.
NEWS
June 20, 2007
William Eaton Perryclear Sr., former worm farm owner and museum curator, died of esophageal cancer Monday at Anne Arundel Medical Center. The Annapolis resident was 66. Mr. Perryclear was born in Pittsburgh and raised in Govans and Roland Park. He was a 1958 graduate of City College and earned a bachelor's degree in English literature in 1962 from Washington and Jefferson College in Washington, Pa. Mr. Perryclear was an insurance agent from 1962 until 1975, when he moved to Delta, Pa., and established William & Mary Enterprises, a worm and organic soil farm.
FEATURES
By J. L. Conklin and J. L. Conklin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 21, 1997
The Washington Ballet has jumped on the big-band wagon with company member John Goding's newest ballet, "Rhapsody Swing" -- one of three world premieres on the program during the company's run at the Kennedy Center's Terrace Theater.But unlike Miami Ballet's "The Big Band Supermegatroid," Goding's ballet doesn't merely resuscitate old dance forms. Instead, he follows the choreographic dictates of GeorgeBalanchine and uses the well-worn steps as a springboard to illuminate the well-known music of Glenn Miller and others.
NEWS
August 7, 1997
Clarence M. Kelley,85, who succeeded J. Edgar Hoover as director of the FBI and steered the agency through the turmoil of the post-Watergate period, died Tuesday in Kansas City, Mo. He had battled minor strokes and emphysema in recent years.Sidney Simon,80, a sculptor whose works grace fountains at the World Wide Plaza in New York City and the Graham Building in Philadelphia, died of congestive heart failure Monday in Boston.Peter A. Carruthers,61, a physicist who helped Arizona contend in the late 1980s for a controversial atom smasher, died Sunday in Tucson from liver disease.
NEWS
August 16, 2005
In Loving Memory of WILLIAM W. "BILL" REAL. August 9, 1941-July 21, 2005. Loving father of Kathryn R. Poindexter (Joe) and Kimberlee R. Heuneman (Jeremy). Constant companion of his twin brother Ronald E. Real (Dee). Proud grandfather of Abigail K., Joseph E., and Benjamin R. Poindexter and Caleb R. and Joshua B. Heuneman. Bill was outgoing, giving, and had a wonderful sense of humor. He was a faithful employee of Western Electric/AT&T for thirty-six years. He took great pride in his hobby as a hunter and enjoyed spending many years of good times with his friends from the "Sunrisers" hunting club.
TRAVEL
By Joshua Kurlantzick and Joshua Kurlantzick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 27, 2000
It's all over. They passed out the million bucks and everyone's gone home, but you still can't get "Survivor" out of your mind. Apparently, you are not the only one with a Robinson Crusoe fantasy. Since the strangely captivating TV show began last spring, travel operators in several of the Asia-Pacific's more isolated locales have reported an increase in bookings. The TV castaways on Palau Tiga Island in the South China Sea had to put up with all sorts of deprivations and betrayals by their companions, not to mention an occasional meal of vermin.
NEWS
August 17, 2005
In Loving Memory of WILLIAM W. "BILL" REAL. August 9, 1941-July 21, 2005. Loving father of Kathryn R. Poindexter (Joe) and Kimberlee R. Heuneman (Jeremy). Constant companion of his twin brother Ronald E. Real (Dee). Proud grandfather of Abigail K., Joseph E., and Benjamin R. Poindexter and Caleb R. and Joshua B. Heuneman. Bill was outgoing, giving, and had a wonderful sense of humor. He was a faithful employee of Western Electric/AT&T for thirty-six years. He took great pride in his hobby as a hunter and enjoyed spending many years of good times with his friends from the "Sunrisers" hunting club.
TRAVEL
By Joshua Kurlantzick and Joshua Kurlantzick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 27, 2000
It's all over. They passed out the million bucks and everyone's gone home, but you still can't get "Survivor" out of your mind. Apparently, you are not the only one with a Robinson Crusoe fantasy. Since the strangely captivating TV show began last spring, travel operators in several of the Asia-Pacific's more isolated locales have reported an increase in bookings. The TV castaways on Palau Tiga Island in the South China Sea had to put up with all sorts of deprivations and betrayals by their companions, not to mention an occasional meal of vermin.
NEWS
August 7, 1997
Clarence M. Kelley,85, who succeeded J. Edgar Hoover as director of the FBI and steered the agency through the turmoil of the post-Watergate period, died Tuesday in Kansas City, Mo. He had battled minor strokes and emphysema in recent years.Sidney Simon,80, a sculptor whose works grace fountains at the World Wide Plaza in New York City and the Graham Building in Philadelphia, died of congestive heart failure Monday in Boston.Peter A. Carruthers,61, a physicist who helped Arizona contend in the late 1980s for a controversial atom smasher, died Sunday in Tucson from liver disease.
FEATURES
By J. L. Conklin and J. L. Conklin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 21, 1997
The Washington Ballet has jumped on the big-band wagon with company member John Goding's newest ballet, "Rhapsody Swing" -- one of three world premieres on the program during the company's run at the Kennedy Center's Terrace Theater.But unlike Miami Ballet's "The Big Band Supermegatroid," Goding's ballet doesn't merely resuscitate old dance forms. Instead, he follows the choreographic dictates of GeorgeBalanchine and uses the well-worn steps as a springboard to illuminate the well-known music of Glenn Miller and others.
NEWS
By Christian Science Monitor | September 30, 1994
KOROR, Palau -- A traditional Micronesian steam bath for a woman about to give birth will open today two days of ceremonies marking the independence of the Republic of Palau, a tiny Pacific island-state with a population of 15,000.The ceremonies end the last United Nations trusteeship and more than a decade of nominal self-government overseen by the U.S. Department of Interior.While Palau's neighbors -- the Federated States of Micronesia and the Republic of the Marshall Islands -- achieved independence in 1986, and the Northern Marianas chose to become a commonwealth of the United States, Palauans have engaged in an internal struggle over their status since 1981.
FEATURES
By Ann Owens Gilliland | October 14, 1990
Nobody ends up in Palau by accident.It's not on the way to anyplace. It has no great museum of art. No Eiffel Tower. No Roman Colosseum or Westminster Abbey.It's even hard to find on a map, since locally it's called Belau. Lying about 700 miles southwest of Guam west of Micronesia, this tropical chain of islands seems to be in the heart of nowhere.The U.S. Marines of World War II know about it. In a brutal battle, the 1st Marine Division stormed the beach on Sept. 15, 1944 -- and was virtually wiped out -- down at Peleliu, one of Palau's southwesternmost islands.
NEWS
By Mark Silva and Carol J. Williams and Mark Silva and Carol J. Williams,Tribune Washington Bureau | June 10, 2009
WASHINGTON - -The first terrorism suspect to be moved from Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to the United States for trial appeared Tuesday in federal court in New York where he pleaded not guilty to 286 murder and conspiracy charges in the bombings of U.S. embassies in Tanzania and Kenya. Ahmed Khalfan Ghailani, a Tanzanian held at Guantanamo since 2006, had been flown to New York under U.S. marshal escort and detained at the Metropolitan Correctional Center. President Barack Obama has pledged to close the Guantanamo prison by January and relocate its 240 prisoners from the U.S. naval base in southern Cuba.
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