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May 10, 2010
I would like to thank Faheem Younus for his poignant commentary on the issue of blasphemy laws in Pakistan ("Blasphemy laws: the root of Pakistani extremism," May 10). Though it is encouraging that the State Department has placed Pakistan on the list of "countries of particular concern," more concerted effort has to be made by both countries to get to the root of terrorism. The writer made a very pertinent point that though "few Pakistanis actually terrorize minorities and non-Muslims, many others have cheered or remained silent."
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NEWS
By Faheem Younus | December 4, 2013
American drones have been operating since 2004 in the Federally Administered Tribal Areas of Pakistan, my motherland. But on Nov. 21, a drone fired missiles at a religious seminary in Hangu, a settled area in mainland Pakistan, killing five men in addition to a top leader of the pro-Taliban Haqqani network. Pakistanis are angry. Imran Khan, the chairman of the Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf party, which has publicly declared the U.S. aid to Pakistan a "curse," is calling for the U.S. drones to be shot down.
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NEWS
By Henry Chu and Henry Chu,Los Angeles Times | February 21, 2007
NEW DELHI -- Pakistan's top envoy arrived in India's capital yesterday to nudge along a fitful peace process in the aftermath of a deadly firebombing aboard a train connecting the rival nations. The attack on the Samjhauta Express, in which at least 68 people burned to death, lent a greater sense of urgency to a previously scheduled visit by Pakistani Foreign Minister Mian Khursheed Mehmood Kasuri. Most of the passengers who died in Sunday night's blazes, which devoured the interior of two crowded coaches, were Pakistanis returning home on the New Delhi-to-Lahore rail line.
NEWS
By John J. Connolly | December 20, 2012
The State Department revealed this month that the United States has detained more than 200 children at its military prison in Afghanistan. I represent one of them, a boy who left his parents' home in Karachi, Pakistan in July 2008, when he was 14, on a trip to his grandparents' house in western Pakistan. He was allegedly captured in Afghanistan a few weeks later and has been "detained" at Bagram Air Force Base ever since. What frustrates me about the State Department report is not the number of children detained, but that the U.S. won't let me or other lawyers make a case that these children should be released.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 12, 1999
NEW DELHI, India -- Pakistan fired a surface-to-air missile at an Indian aircraft yesterday, keeping tensions between the belligerent neighbors at a high boil.The missile, which missed its target, was aimed in the direction of two jet fighters and three helicopters flying near the wreckage of a Pakistani naval surveillance plane that was shot down by India on Tuesday morning, killing the 16 people on board.Pakistani soldiers near the wreckage have set up mortars, anti-aircraft missiles and machine guns -- all pointing toward the border with India.
NEWS
By Carol J. Williams and Carol J. Williams,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 3, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Iraqi insurgents released yesterday three captives they threatened to behead - two Turks and a Pakistani - but continued to harass foreign workers, firing rockets into two Baghdad hotels housing security contractors. The release of the Turkish air-conditioning repairmen had been expected. Their employer, Kayteks, had capitulated to militants' demands that the company cease all support and cooperation with the multinational forces in Iraq. The Arabic satellite television channel Al-Jazeera aired footage showing the men kneeling at the feet of two masked captors who said they were freeing the Turks for showing "repentance" and out of respect for the Turkish people, who are fellow Muslims.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 23, 1999
SIACHEN GLACIER, Western Himalayas -- For 15 blustery, shivering years, the Indian and Pakistani armies have been fighting a war along the frigid peaks of the western Himalayas -- in an area named for the Siachen Glacier and known as the battleground on the roof of the world. For a soldier, this is where hell freezes over, a 46-mile river of slow-moving ice surrounded by stupendous towers of snow. Temperatures drop to 50 below, and sudden blizzards can bury field artillery in minutes.
NEWS
By Chris Kraul and Chris Kraul,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 4, 2003
KABUL, Afghanistan - The U.S. military said yesterday that it had a right to chase suspected terrorists operating in unsettled southeastern Afghan border areas into Pakistani territory, a position that a high Pakistani Interior Ministry official later rejected. The dispute comes after a still-murky border clash Sunday when a man dressed in the uniform of a Pakistani border scout fired on a U.S. military patrol near Shkin, wounding one GI. Americans then called in an airstrike that killed two Pakistanis.
NEWS
By Alex Rodriguez and Alex Rodriguez,Tribune Newspapers | October 6, 2009
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - - A suicide bomber disguised as a Pakistani security officer attacked the lobby of a heavily guarded and fortified U.N. office in Islamabad on Monday, killing five other people and heightening fears of renewed violence in Pakistan's capital after a long lull in suicide attacks. The midday bombing occurred at Islamabad headquarters of the World Food Program. Dressed in the uniform of a paramilitary police officer, the bomber asked a security official at the agency's main gate for permission to use the bathroom, said Pakistani Interior Minister Rehman Malik.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 2, 2004
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - The founder of the Pakistan's nuclear weapons program, Abdul Qadeer Khan, has signed a detailed confession admitting that over the past 15 years he provided Iran, North Korea and Libya the designs and technology to produce the fuel for nuclear weapons, according to a senior Pakistani official and three Pakistani journalists who attended a government briefing here last night. In a 2 1/2 -hour presentation to 20 Pakistani journalists, a senior government official gave an exhaustive and startling account of how Khan, a national hero, made millions of dollars selling secret technology to three countries that have been striving to produce nuclear arsenals.
NEWS
October 16, 2012
As a Muslim, I am appalled by the Taliban's recent attack on the Pakistani teenager Malala Yousefzai, a blogger and female education rights activist ("Outspoken teen shot," Oct. 10). Islam is not only opposed to such senseless violence but obligates all believers to acquire knowledge. The Prophet Muhammad said "seeking knowledge is obligatory for every Muslim man and Muslim woman. " Moreover, the education of women is emphasized in his teaching that "if a man brings up his daughter, gives her a good education and trains her in the arts of life, I would stand between him and hellfire.
FEATURES
By L'Oreal Thompson, Baltimore Sun Media Group | October 12, 2012
Wedding day: Sept. 29, 2012 The bride: Salmah Y. Rizvi, 26, grew up in Laurel. She works for the Department of Defense. Her father, Anwar H. Rizvi, is a plant pathologist for the United States Department of Agriculture. Her mother, Shamoon H. Rizvi, is a dialysis nurse at Bon Secours Hospital in Baltimore. The groom: Imran M. Akram, 29, grew up in New York before moving to Baltimore. He is a chemical engineer for the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. His mother, Zahida Rashid, is a special-education teacher in New York.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2012
U.S. counterterrorism efforts monitor and sort vast databases of information for clues on potential plots. Now a team of University of Maryland researchers have used data-mining techniques employed by online giants like Google and Amazon.com to aid in the fight against terror. In the same way corporate America uses algorithms to predict what consumers are most likely to buy or what ads they might click, the researchers analyzed two decades of data on Pakistani terrorist group Lashkar-e-Taiba.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2011
A 46-year-old Silver Spring man pleaded guilty Friday to illegally transporting nuclear materials to U.S. enemies in Pakistan, the Maryland U.S. Attorney's Office announced. Prosecutors said Nadeem Akhtar, a Pakistani national and lawful U.S. resident, owned Computer Communication USA, which he used to obtain various nuclear materials, including radiation detection devices, and other mechanical items worth more than $400,000 for export to restricted entities in Pakistan from 2005 through 2010.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2011
U.S. Customs agents intercepted a 24-ton shipment of Pakistani rice infested by a destructive crop pest this week at the port of Baltimore — just days before a federal quarantine on such imports was scheduled to begin. The Customs and Border Protection agency reported that its agents found dead Khapra beetles, a species that has been showing up in rice imports with growing frequency, aboard a ship Tuesday. The agency said a scientist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture confirmed the identification of the insect the following day. Restrictions on imports of rice from countries where Khapra beetle infestations are known to occur go into effect Saturday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | May 2, 2011
The more information that comes out about Pakistani officials, the less it's looking like all aspects of the country's government were American allies against Osama bin Laden.  President Barack Obama made it clear that he did not share information about the U.S.'s surprise raid against bin Laden with Pakistani officials until after the terrorist leader was killed.  Why? I suspect he didn't want bin Laden to be tipped off.  British officials seem to agree. From today's New York Times :  “ Some of them have been complicit in concealing Osama bin Laden for a very long time ,” said Sir Christopher Meyer, who was British ambassador to the United States at the time of the Sept.
NEWS
By Zulfiqar Ali and Laura King and Zulfiqar Ali and Laura King,Los Angeles Times | June 20, 2007
PESHAWAR, Pakistan -- About 30 suspected Islamic insurgents were killed yesterday when explosions ripped through a compound near the Afghan border that was described by Pakistani intelligence officials as a militant training camp. The compound, which housed a madrassa, or Muslim seminary, was in North Waziristan, a semiautonomous tribal area along the Afghan frontier that is a sanctuary for Taliban and militants linked to al-Qaida. Tribal sources said they believed that the blasts, which occurred about 10:30 a.m. in the district of Data Khel about two miles from the Afghan border, were caused by missiles fired either by an airborne drone or by Western forces from across the border.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 14, 1994
MOGADISHU, Somalia -- A senior Pakistani official charged yesterday that the U.S. military is leasing obsolete helicopters to the United Nations peacekeeping force the United States is leaving behind in Somalia, and he indicated to the visiting chairman of the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff that without better equipment, the entire mission could be jeopardized.In a news conference closing his 22-hour tour of U.S. and U.N. camps in the Somalian capital, Gen. John M. Shalikashvili said he would review Pakistan's request when he returned to Washington.
NEWS
March 25, 2011
A Reuters article in The Sun ( "Pakistani leader condemns Quran burning," March 23) quoted Pakistan President Asif Ali Zardari as stating, "I ... strongly condemn, on behalf the people of Pakistan and on my own belief, the deliberate desecration of the Holy Quran by a fanatic in Florida. " He also called on the United Nations to address the matter. In reaction there was demonstration and the people of Pakistan were permitted to burn American Flags. The president said it was a serious setback to efforts to promote harmony in the world.
NEWS
May 10, 2010
I would like to thank Faheem Younus for his poignant commentary on the issue of blasphemy laws in Pakistan ("Blasphemy laws: the root of Pakistani extremism," May 10). Though it is encouraging that the State Department has placed Pakistan on the list of "countries of particular concern," more concerted effort has to be made by both countries to get to the root of terrorism. The writer made a very pertinent point that though "few Pakistanis actually terrorize minorities and non-Muslims, many others have cheered or remained silent."
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