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NEWS
May 17, 2011
Our country has many problems. To list a few there are all the homes in the Midwest recently destroyed from all the tornadoes. Also, what about the future of Social Security and Medicare? How about all the homeless and hungry in our own country? How can we possibly find funding to help solve all these problems? Here's a better question: How can our president and Congress, in good conscience, keep sending $3.2 billion each year to Pakistan? I don't even know where they find this much money especially when all I read about is how the American public will need to bear the brunt of some historic budget cuts.
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NEWS
By Kristine Beckerle, Deborah Francois and Babur Khwaja | August 28, 2014
Police in Faisalabad, Pakistan's third largest city, tortured more than 1,400 people during a six-year period, according to a report researched and written by the Allard K. Lowenstein International Human Rights Clinic at Yale Law School, for Justice Project Pakistan (JPP), a non-governmental organization based in Lahore, Pakistan. The report, which we authored, documents how law enforcement uses its power to inflict pain largely with impunity. Police beat detainees, hang them by their arms or feet for hours on end, force them to witness the torture of others, and strip them naked and parade them in public.
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NEWS
By Saira Khan | February 14, 2010
KARACHI, Pakistan--With images of bearded men forcing bombs upon brainwashed youths and delirious women shouting crazy things at their trials, it is hard to imagine that Pakistan is a country that celebrates a largely Western holiday such as Valentine's Day. In fact, the holiday is probably as big an event in Pakistan as it is in the United States. In a society that does not condone premarital relationships, let alone the expression of affection among these couples, it is interesting to see how Valentine's Day has made its way into Pakistani society.
NEWS
June 2, 2014
An American cardiologist, Dr. Mehdi Ali Qamar, was recently murdered in Pakistan for his faith ( "American doctor shot dead in Pakistan in suspected sectarian attack," May 27). He was an Ahmadi Muslim traveling back to his country of origin to volunteer his services at the Tahir Heart Institute in Rabwah, Pakistan, as many Ahmadi doctors do. A few days into his visit he was visiting the graves of other Ahmadis, including his father, when he was gunned down in front of his family by unknown assailants.
NEWS
May 20, 2011
My opinion of President Obama rose when he ordered the successful raid to eliminate the mass murderer Osama bin Laden. Now if our government would only take the next reasonable step and also eliminate the $3.2 billion in aid that we send to Pakistan, I would really be impressed! How ludicrous for Pakistan to claim that they didn't know bin Laden had been sheltered in their country for years! They are obviously trying to play both ends against the middle, trying to appease the Taliban while taking money from America, and why not?
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | May 5, 2011
Only in America would a president respond to the public celebrating over the killing of Osama bin Laden with the sports cliche he used: "We don't need to spike the football. " But millions of Americans who have their eyes glued on gridirons across the country on weekend television knew at once what he meant — that there was no need to cheer the event as if the home team had just scored the winning touchdown. President Barack Obama uttered the advice in announcing that no photographs or video would be released of bin Laden's corpse, or its disposal into the Arabian Sea, to prove that he really was dead and gone.
NEWS
February 2, 2010
RAWALPINDI, Pakistan - Pakistan has told U.S. military leaders it is willing to help train Afghan soldiers to fight Taliban forces, the country's army chief said Monday, a promising gesture by a government at times skeptical of Washington's strategy. Gen. Ashfaq Parvez Kayani sought to counter criticisms from the West that Pakistan is a reluctant ally when it comes to battling the Taliban in Afghanistan. The training of Afghanistan's national army and its police is seen as a vital cog in President Barack Obama's strategy to defeat the Taliban and ready the country for the eventual withdrawal of U.S. troops.
NEWS
April 16, 1995
Fair's fair. By any standard of equity, refusing a refund for undelivered goods that were paid for is grossly unjust. The United States has good reason to deny delivery of $1 billion in military equipment, including 28 F-16 jet fighters, to Pakistan. But it has no justification for holding onto the payment it received in advance, much less having the gall to charge Pakistan for storage of the sequestered jets. President Clinton is correct in deciding to give the money back or to return it in the form of services that will not reward Pakistan's obduracy about continuing its nuclear weapons program.
NEWS
May 2, 2002
THE 1999 coup that brought Gen. Pervez Musharraf to power in Pakistan was good for the country. Mr. Musharraf proved himself to be an intelligent leader, and his popularity, particularly among the educated middle classes fed up with corruption and religious pandering by the country's traditional politicians, soared. He put Pakistan on the right side of world events after Sept. 11. This makes his insistence on holding a referendum -- extending his grip on the presidency by five years -- all the more troubling and disappointing.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2014
Dr. Abdul Ghaffar Qureshi, a retired surgeon who worked with the elderly residents of Baltimore's public high-rise apartments, died of complications of Alzheimer's disease May 6 at Quail Run Assisted Living in Perry Hall. He was 75 and had lived in Westminster and Linthicum. Born in a village in Pakistan, he was the son of Ghulam Haider, a school headmaster, and his wife, Ameer, a homemaker. He received a scholarship to study medicine at Nishtar Medical College in Multan, Punjab, Pakistan.
NEWS
March 19, 2014
Thanks for publishing the report that CIA officer Jonathan Bank was suspended because of his "management style" in the Iran operations division ( "CIA official punished after probe finds he created hostile workplace," March 17). More interesting, Mr. Bank was previously the station chief in Islamabad, Pakistan and "was pulled out" as his name was leaked to the media. Most interesting, "U.S. officials think Pakistan's intelligence service leaked the name in a dispute over CIA drone attacks in the country's tribal belt.
NEWS
By Victor Davis Hanson | December 29, 2013
The gangster state of North Korea became a nuclear power in 2006-2007, despite lots of foreign aid aimed at precluding just such proliferation -- help usually not otherwise accorded such a loony dictatorship. Apparently the civilized world rightly suspected that if nuclear, Pyongyang would either export nuclear material and expertise to other unstable countries, or bully its successful but non-nuclear neighbors -- or both. The United States has given billions of dollars in foreign aid to Pakistan, whose Islamist gangs have spearheaded radical anti-American terrorism.
NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | August 14, 2013
There's a grade-school-level international game being played. It's like the one you played as a kid when you would have a friend punch you as hard as possible in the stomach to see how long you could keep a fake smile plastered on your face. "Oh, THAT didn't hurt AT ALL! Hit me harder, you wimp!" That, right now, is America -- and it needs to stop. Let's take two recent beneficiaries of the goodies-for-abuse program: Russia and Pakistan. Russia apparently doesn't feel that granting asylum to National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden and his multiple laptops and thumb drives is a big deal.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | May 4, 2013
As a teenager in the mid-1990s, he moved with his parents to the United States from Pakistan. The family sought and received political asylum. They settled in Baltimore County and operated a gas station. The boy attended Owings Mills High School. His cricket skills helped him excel at baseball, the quintessential American game. "He always seemed like such a nice young man," said the chair of the English department. The nice young man graduated in 1999. He picked up a job as a data administrator with the Maryland Office of Planning.
NEWS
By Joel Brinkley | January 28, 2013
Distracted by the deadly violence in Mali and Algeria, no one seems to be paying adequate attention to the tragicomedy under way in Pakistan. This matters because recent events demonstrate without equivocation that Pakistan is an utterly failed state -- but one that possesses nuclear weapons. The country is tumbling down the abyss. Where else could a fundamentalist Muslim cleric who lives in Canada draw tens of thousands of fans to a rally calling for dissolution of the government -- speaking from inside a shipping container with a bulletproof window?
NEWS
By Lynn R. Goldman and Michael J. Klag | January 7, 2013
The news that the Central Intelligence Agency had been running a fake vaccination program in Pakistan first surfaced in 2011 and quickly ignited fears that the covert operation could compromise the global campaign to eradicate polio. Late last month, a handful of vaccine workers, including a teenage girl, paid the price for the CIA's deceit: They were gunned down as they tried to give the polio vaccine to children living in the Pakistani city of Karachi and other areas. No one has taken responsibility for the attacks, although the Pakistani Taliban has threatened vaccine workers in the past.
NEWS
August 19, 2012
The attack by Taliban fighters this week on a major Pakistani air base where nuclear weapons allegedly were stored offered a dramatic example of what the U.S. fears most about its unstable, nuclear-armed ally. Though Pakistan claimed its forces repelled the attackers and denied that nuclear weapons were even present on the site, the incident inevitably revived long-standing U.S. concerns that terrorists could get their hands on a weapon of mass destruction. The attack on the Minhas air force base and aeronautical college in Kamra, 37 miles north of Islamabad, was carried out early Thursday morning by gunman armed with automatic weapons and rocket-propelled grenades.
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