Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPairs Of Shoes
IN THE NEWS

Pairs Of Shoes

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Sun Staff Writer | January 26, 1995
Laura McDaniel takes her shoes seriously . . . all 100 pairs of them.That's why when she decided to buy a new home, she made one request of the builder: She wanted enough closet space to show off her shoes.But until her home is finished this spring, her collection of footwear -- which includes leopard-print heels, beaded sneakers and fuchsia pumps -- will remain in assorted shoe racks around her current Crownsville home."I long to own a closet that can meet all my clothing demands," says Ms. McDaniel, 34, programs manager for Dollar Systems Inc. "I'd like it to look like a retail store room."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2013
A raid in April on the Pikesville home of a suspected drug trafficker turned up the usual tools of the trade, according to court documents: bundles of cash, some marijuana, seven handguns, a scale and a money counting machine. But agents also seized 98 pairs of men's shoes, according to the document. And authorities are now seeking to keep the footwear - which they value at $48,340, or $493 a pair - alleging that they were bought with drug money. The shoe collection is not described in the document, but the man whose feet they presumably fit is identified as Jerome Castle.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | October 9, 2009
David Joseph Kessler, former president and owner of Kessler Shoe Manufacturing Co., whose Mother Goose line of shoes was worn by generations of children throughout the nation, died Monday of heart disease at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The longtime Pikesville resident was 88. Born in Baltimore, the son of an immigrant shoemaker from Europe, Mr. Kessler was raised in Northwest Baltimore. During the 1920s, his father made $40-a-pair hand-turned women's shoes. "They were made so well that you could fold them up and put them in your pocket.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | October 9, 2009
David Joseph Kessler, former president and owner of Kessler Shoe Manufacturing Co., whose Mother Goose line of shoes was worn by generations of children throughout the nation, died Monday of heart disease at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The longtime Pikesville resident was 88. Born in Baltimore, the son of an immigrant shoemaker from Europe, Mr. Kessler was raised in Northwest Baltimore. During the 1920s, his father made $40-a-pair hand-turned women's shoes. "They were made so well that you could fold them up and put them in your pocket.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Natalie Baughman and Natalie Baughman,Knight Ridder / Tribune | July 1, 2001
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- At the end of each day, employees at Gladstone Bowl re-shelve the bowling shoes that patrons have heaped on the front counter. Lately, it has taken them less time to finish the chore. The reason: There are fewer shoes to shelve. People have been stealing them from the alley at an alarming rate, manager Vicki Davis said. "It seems like every week we lose at least a dozen pairs of shoes," Davis said. "I think people are wearing them outdoors to make a fashion statement."
NEWS
April 13, 1995
"The Ethics of International Relations" will be the theme of the four-day 35th annual Naval Academy Foreign Affairs Conference, which begins Monday.About 180 student delegates from more than 100 colleges in the United States and eight other countries will gather for meetings, speeches and discussions of global events.Speakers will include Rushworth Kidder, president of the Institute for Global Ethics, at 2:15 p.m. Monday in Alumni Hall; Paul D. Wolfowitz, dean of the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies at the Johns Hopkins University, 1 p.m. Tuesday in Alumni Hall; and Hanna Suchocka, former prime minister of Poland, 7:45 p.m. Wednesday in King Hall.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller | January 26, 2008
A mobile shoe store stocked with more than 1,000 pairs of sneakers and steel-toed boots was stolen from a Glen Burnie parking lot, a store employee and police said. The 28-foot box truck - stripped bare - was recovered in Baltimore County hours after the theft Thursday from the parking lot behind the Red Wing Shoes retail store and warehouse in the 7100 block of Ritchie Highway, said Karen Gower, the industrial sales manager. She said she lost about 1,140 pairs of shoes, socks and shoe inserts, worth about $150,000.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Staff Writer | May 20, 1992
Bea'Marie Bradley is an operations manager for a computer company. To keep to a trim size 5, she competes in area triathlons and runs miles daily with husband, Joe. How would you describe your taste in clothing?I'm casually conservative, but I do have my moments. I love silk and bright colors. When I decide to sew it's to make something unique in fabric I won't see on anyone else.What's the newest thing in your closet?A pair of black pants and a bright purple cropped jacket I got at a red dot sale.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Sun Staff Writer | July 20, 1995
When life changes, Alice Caplan believes your clothes should, too.So after getting separated last year, the 60-year-old secretary cleaned out the closet of her Owings Mills home, trading in her soft culottes and cardigans for classic blazers and scarves.The wardrobe transformation has won praise from friends and colleagues. But the person who seems most delighted is Alice Caplan herself."I meshed my clothes," she says, "with the person I wanted to be."It seems like your change of lifestyle had a profound effect on your style.
NEWS
By Jamie Manfuso and Jamie Manfuso,SUN STAFF | January 15, 2001
The shelves are mostly empty, and shoppers are scarce. But Dan Bros. Discount Shoes is back in business. The nearly 70-year-old South Baltimore fixture at 1032 S. Charles St. did not close as expected, but instead changed hands and is getting a face lift. Amir Nia, a Rockville man who is a shoe importer, took over the business Jan. 1. In early November, local celebrities and dignitaries bid adieu to Dan Bros. in what was supposed to be its going-out-of-business sale. The store unloaded all but roughly 60 of the 12,000 pairs of shoes left in the store, at prices ranging from $20 to $1,700.
NEWS
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2008
Stylish Brigit Bowers has a philosophy about fashion: "Fashion is a means of individual expression, transforming and changing along with your life's phases and experiences." Right now, this 21-year-old Roland Park resident is experiencing her summer job as a hostess at Salt Restaurant before beginning her senior year at Vanderbilt University. But, we'd say her fashion reflects an individual expression that promises a chic future. Age: : 21 Residence: : Roland Park Job: : Vanderbilt University senior, part-time hostess at Salt Self-described style: : "Individualized, neutral, dynamic and classically contemporary."
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller | January 26, 2008
A mobile shoe store stocked with more than 1,000 pairs of sneakers and steel-toed boots was stolen from a Glen Burnie parking lot, a store employee and police said. The 28-foot box truck - stripped bare - was recovered in Baltimore County hours after the theft Thursday from the parking lot behind the Red Wing Shoes retail store and warehouse in the 7100 block of Ritchie Highway, said Karen Gower, the industrial sales manager. She said she lost about 1,140 pairs of shoes, socks and shoe inserts, worth about $150,000.
FEATURES
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN REPORTER | September 22, 2007
The little one said a lot. Anchoring a row of nine nicely manicured toenails across Kelly Thomasson's flip-flops was one that was not only unshellacked, but altogether missing. The 28-year-old recreational runner from Pasadena had been wearing shoes that were too small, and the constant jamming of her feet into the tops of her sneakers took its toll - a common mistake that causes untold pain and, according to her and her husband, unsightly feet. At stake were her regular workouts on the road and at the gym. A friend and more experienced runner recommended she get some professional help, not from a doctor but an experienced retailer.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,special to the sun | July 28, 2007
When Kim and Brian Gross picked up their 1-year-old daughter Riley from day care, she was often barefoot -- even in the winter. Because the child's shoes were hard-soled, the day care workers took them off to let the youngster toddle more easily. It was only a matter of time before the socks came off, too. Frustrated in their search to find shoes flexible enough for their young child to wear through the day, the Cockeysville couple decided to design their own. Now Rileyroos, as the shoes are called, are sold in stores in Maryland and beyond.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,Sun Reporter | June 24, 2007
When the sun bears down and the mercury rises, nothing wears better than cool, forgiving linen. It's breezy and comfortable and has a way of looking rich, even if the clothes were purchased at bargain-basement prices. WONDERING IF YOU WERE GLIMPSED? Check out baltimoresun.com / glimpsed for additional photos of fashion-forward locals and a critique by fashion writer Tanika White of the styles she saw around town. NICK JONES Age: 47 Residence: West Baltimore Job: Home improver Self-described style: "Excellent."
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN REPORTER | April 1, 2007
You know a confident woman when you see one. There's something in her stride, in her lifted chin. Her complexion glows, her posture commands attention. Something about a confident woman makes you want to know her, or at least know more about her. Mary Kay Ash, the late founder of Mary Kay Cosmetics, once said, "While clothes may not make the woman, they certainly have a strong effect on her self-confidence - which, I believe, does make the woman." Which is exactly why we wanted to get to know the four fashionable women profiled below.
NEWS
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and Michelle Deal-Zimmerman,Sun Repoter | December 31, 2006
Diane Bell McKoy, 55, describes herself as a constant shopper. But not for material things. She's shopping for donors. As the new CEO of Maryland's largest African-American philanthropic organization, she's focused on reaching out to the community. "When I'm out in public for different events, I'm always shopping for opportunities to make connections," says Bell McKoy, who lives in Ten Hills. She is also writing a book and continuing to mentor young women. Perhaps a donation of one's time is the best gift of all. 1 Treo Smartphone "A PDA [personal digital assistant]
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,Sun Reporter | June 24, 2007
When the sun bears down and the mercury rises, nothing wears better than cool, forgiving linen. It's breezy and comfortable and has a way of looking rich, even if the clothes were purchased at bargain-basement prices. WONDERING IF YOU WERE GLIMPSED? Check out baltimoresun.com / glimpsed for additional photos of fashion-forward locals and a critique by fashion writer Tanika White of the styles she saw around town. NICK JONES Age: 47 Residence: West Baltimore Job: Home improver Self-described style: "Excellent."
NEWS
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and Michelle Deal-Zimmerman,Sun Repoter | December 31, 2006
Diane Bell McKoy, 55, describes herself as a constant shopper. But not for material things. She's shopping for donors. As the new CEO of Maryland's largest African-American philanthropic organization, she's focused on reaching out to the community. "When I'm out in public for different events, I'm always shopping for opportunities to make connections," says Bell McKoy, who lives in Ten Hills. She is also writing a book and continuing to mentor young women. Perhaps a donation of one's time is the best gift of all. 1 Treo Smartphone "A PDA [personal digital assistant]
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,[SUN REPORTER ] | October 15, 2006
Myrna Kaplan had already picked out one pair of shoes by Olivia Rose Tal, and was trying on another. She liked the stylish wedge, but didn't love it. If only the front had a neat little twist, like another pair she had at home. That twist was so snappy. And comfortable. "Can you do a black twist?" Kaplan, of Guilford, asked Dorinne Tal, the shoes' designer, as she waved the sample shoe in the air. "Of course!" Tal said, her favorite phrase of the afternoon. And with that happy accommodation, Kaplan bought that pair of wedges, plus three more.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.