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By Pat Farmer | November 4, 2013
Anya Blakeley, of Neighborhood Acupuncture, will facilitate an intuitive painting and authentic movement workshop Saturday, Nov. 16 from 3 to 6 p.m. at her business at 345 Main St. Ecstatic painting is a form of creative expression that combines authentic movement to ambient, tribal and electronic beats with intuitive painting. Cost for the workshop is $45 per person, which includes all materials. Bring a journal and "dress to mess. " RSVP is required one week prior to event. Call 443-801-7026.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 12, 2014
Brad Jaeger may be "fuming" that anyone complained about arrows painted on the streets for a race ( "Towson spray-painting prompts bill to regulate markings for running events," Oct. 6), but since 1975 the Arbutus Firecracker 10K has made a left turn in front of my house. I don't who is responsible, but this is the first time anyone has seen it necessary to paint an arrow on the street which is still there and probably won't go away until the street is repaved. So I am all for any proposed bill to stop this from happening again.
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NEWS
October 12, 2014
Brad Jaeger may be "fuming" that anyone complained about arrows painted on the streets for a race ( "Towson spray-painting prompts bill to regulate markings for running events," Oct. 6), but since 1975 the Arbutus Firecracker 10K has made a left turn in front of my house. I don't who is responsible, but this is the first time anyone has seen it necessary to paint an arrow on the street which is still there and probably won't go away until the street is repaved. So I am all for any proposed bill to stop this from happening again.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood and The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
The Baltimore County Council is consider new rules for races that are run through neighborhoods after receiving complaints that organizers of a recent event spray-painted streets in Towson. Councilman David Marks, a Perry Hall Republican who represents Towson, wants to regulate races like parades, requiring them to use non-permanent course markings and notify the community about proposed routes. "It's good to give neighbors more information," said Marks, who introduced the bill at Monday's council meeting.
NEWS
By Will FespermanThe Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2014
Thirty artists from across the U.S. and Ireland are competing for a $3,000 prize this week in an Annapolis open-air painting contest. Organized by the Maryland Federation of Art, an arts nonprofit in Annapolis, the competition celebrates "plein air" painting - the creation of outdoor scenes and landscapes. The competition, now in its 12th year, includes several events that are open to the public, including the Paint Annapolis Exhibition Public reception at Circle Gallery and a "Dueling Brushes" two-hour "quick draw" event open to artists of all ages and abilities.
NEWS
By Marie Marciano Gullard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
Mary Veiga practices the art of deception -- but only in the most respectable of ways. Since 1995, she has been plying her skills in decorative painting, which includes murals, faux finishing and trompe l'oeil for homeowners and businesses. With her, every assignment is a custom job and a new challenge that excites. “Trompe l'oeil is French for 'deceive the eye,' so it's a technique for using realistic imagery [and] shadows to create an optical illusion to make [the work] look three-dimensional,” said the Baltimore-based artist, who attended the Maryland Institute College of Art. “Faux painting, again French, means 'false' and is an old art form used to describe a paint finish replicating a real material such as marble, stone or wood.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2013
A federal court in Virginia was asked Friday to determine the proper ownership of a miniature landscape painted by Pierre-Auguste Renoir and allegedly purchased for $7 in a box of odds and ends in a rural flea market. The complaint filed in U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia in Alexandria is essentially the first step in determining where the 1879 "Paysage Bords de Seine" will end up. Such a document is frequently filed by a third party - in this case, the U.S. government - that is holding property whose ownership is in dispute.
NEWS
By Amanda Urban and Amanda Urban,SUN STAFF | September 20, 2002
Artists will be putting themselves on display tomorrow at Paint Annapolis, an outdoor painting event organized by the Mid-Atlantic Plein Air Painters Association. Lee Boyton, a founding member of the 7-month-old association, wanted to try Paint Annapolis after he heard about similar events in the Northeast and on the West Coast. "We are very excited to do something like this in Annapolis," he said, noting that there was such interest and support that Paint Annapolis 2003 has already been planned.
NEWS
By Photos by Chiaki Kawajiri and Photos by Chiaki Kawajiri,sun photographer | October 9, 2006
In her shop in Montgomery Village, Savita Jain practices the ancient form of henna art - applying a temporary stain made from a ground-up plant in intricate patterns on her client's bodies. Jain says she has equal numbers of Indian and American clients. The Indian clients prefer to have their hands and feet adorned, while Americans are apt to ask for designs on all parts of their bodies. The stain lasts about three weeks.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,sun reporter | May 11, 2007
After 30 years of lobbying, campaigning and organizing to save open spaces in Maryland, Nancy Lee Davis of Clarksville has turned to a different preservation tool: the paintbrush. Davis, a founder of the Maryland League of Conservation Voters, has been personally drawn to barns, old houses and open fields - particularly on the Eastern Shore - as subjects for her oil paintings. She said she realized that "I could at least capture on canvas those things that were disappearing." Her paintings are on display at the Artists' Gallery in the American Cities Building in Columbia through May 25. Davis said she got involved in preservation causes while raising her children, who are now grown.
NEWS
By Marie Marciano Gullard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
Mary Veiga practices the art of deception -- but only in the most respectable of ways. Since 1995, she has been plying her skills in decorative painting, which includes murals, faux finishing and trompe l'oeil for homeowners and businesses. With her, every assignment is a custom job and a new challenge that excites. “Trompe l'oeil is French for 'deceive the eye,' so it's a technique for using realistic imagery [and] shadows to create an optical illusion to make [the work] look three-dimensional,” said the Baltimore-based artist, who attended the Maryland Institute College of Art. “Faux painting, again French, means 'false' and is an old art form used to describe a paint finish replicating a real material such as marble, stone or wood.
ENTERTAINMENT
Timothy B. Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2014
The decades-long decline in lead-poisoned children in Maryland has essentially stalled, but state officials said Thursday they are taking steps in the coming months to address gaps in the marathon effort to eliminate the environmental health threat. Statewide, 2,622 youngsters up to age 6 were found to have harmful levels of lead in their blood last year, according to an annual report just released by the Maryland Department of the Environment. That's down 4 percent from 2012, though the number of children with seriously elevated lead levels grew slightly, from 364 to 371. Exposure to even minute amounts of lead can harm still-developing brains and nervous systems of young children, leading to learning and behavioral problems.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Morgan Eichensehr and For The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
Jen Seidel had no idea that when she decided to shake things up at a costume party eight years ago, she would end up falling in love with body paint artistry and turning it into a successful career. Now, Seidel has released a coffee table book, "Covered," featuring photos of her modeled artwork and hopes to use it as a tool to help others and continue to "paint it forward. " In a recent phone interview, Seidel, 45, who lives in Reisterstown, talked about how she got started in body painting, where it's taken her in her career and why she, well, does what she does.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg and For The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
The flowering branches of Mulan magnolia that grace the cover of Joan Lok's new book on Chinese brush painting appear more brightly colored than in her original work, probably to catch the eye of someone browsing in a bookstore, guesses the author. The Columbia resident says she is pleased with the quality of paper used for the book and the way the reproductions of her original flower paintings neatly fit with the detailed instructions on the soft-cover book's 128 pages. And the longtime federal employee is also happy her first how-to book will be available at bookshops and at a local chain of craft stores, tapping into a marketing niche.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
A Baltimore jury has awarded nearly $2.1 million to a 17-year-old city youth who was allegedly poisoned by lead paint in the 1990s when he was a toddler in an East Baltimore rental home. The judgment against Elliot Dackman and the estates of Sandra and Bernard Dackman came Friday in Baltimore Circuit Court, at the end of the weeklong trial of a lawsuit brought on behalf of Daquantay Robinson by his mother, Tiesha Robinson. The jury verdict shows the long-running tide of litigation over the widespread use of lead-based paint in Baltimore's older rental housing has yet to ebb, according to Bruce Powell, the Robinsons' lawyer.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
Priscilla Fuller Menzies, an equine painter whose subjects included the fabled thoroughbreds Native Dancer and Secretariat, died of complications from a stroke Aug. 24 at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The former Butler resident was 94. Born in Baltimore and raised in Pikesville and Upperco, she was the daughter of Perry Wade Fuller, a stamp and coin dealer, and Anita Sherwood Fuller, a sports enthusiast. She was a 1938 graduate of Garrison Forest School. She earned a bachelor's degree at what is now the Maryland Institute College of Art and studied with Jacques Maroger, a French-born painter who explored the own paint medium using old techniques and had been on the staff of the Louvre.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Sun Staff Writer | January 13, 1995
It's hardly spring yet, but Mount Airy Elementary School is awash in wildflowers, blue skies and singing birds.The idyllic scene isn't real, but it conveys the idea.As part of a project to brighten the school, the drab school walls have been transformed into cheerful scenes from a small town -- not unlike Mount Airy."We decided that the walls were so plain we needed to make it more child-centered," said Principal Bo Ann Bohman."We work hard to make the classrooms cheerful and bright for the children, and the hallways should be the same," she said.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 19, 2005
Even as a little girl, Katie Rickman loved art. Her coloring book and crayons were never far away. Years ago, she attended an outdoor concert with her mother. That evening there was a beautiful sunset. When Katie noticed it she said, "Quick, Mom, give me my crayons!" The crayons have since been replaced with paints, and Rickman is making quite a splash in the Maryland art world, in the classroom and out. Rickman teaches art at the St. Paul's School for Girls upper school in Brooklandville.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2014
Perhaps it was a prank or a desire for an unique Ocean City souvenir, but either way, a portrait of the founder of the Dunes Manor Hotel that hung in the lobby is missing and the hotel wants it back. Police said the hotel reported the theft of the painting depicting Dunes Manor founder Thelma Conner early Sunday morning. The picture went missing sometime during the night, around 3 a.m., when a hotel security guard noticed it was gone. Conner, who founded the Victorian-style hotel in 1987 at the age of 74, is a beloved figure in Ocean City . She was known for her Texas twang and her tea-time tradition.
NEWS
July 15, 2014
We thank the nameless graffiti artist in Carroll County who spray painted a denunciation of an aborted plan to house some of the thousands of unaccompanied minors who have crossed the southern U.S. border in recent months at a military facility near Westminster. He or she has told us all we need to know about what's driving the furor over these children. No, we're not going to harp on the first part of the message — "No illeagles here" — and claim that stupidity is at the heart of things.
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