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By Will FespermanThe Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2014
Some 30 artists set up their easels all over Annapolis this past week, from quiet back alleys to the lawn of the Maryland State House. Intrigued local residents stopped to chat or simply stare. "Need a model in the picture?" one man shouted from across the street to Karen Scannell, 40, a painter from Ireland. The artists came to Annapolis to compete for a $3,000 prize in an open-air painting contest. Organized by the Annapolis-based nonprofit Maryland Federation of Art, the competition celebrates "plein air" painting - that is, painting outside.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
Priscilla Fuller Menzies, an equine painter whose subjects included the fabled thoroughbreds Native Dancer and Secretariat, died of complications from a stroke Aug. 24 at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The former Butler resident was 94. Born in Baltimore and raised in Pikesville and Upperco, she was the daughter of Perry Wade Fuller, a stamp and coin dealer, and Anita Sherwood Fuller, a sports enthusiast. She was a 1938 graduate of Garrison Forest School. She earned a bachelor's degree at what is now the Maryland Institute College of Art and studied with Jacques Maroger, a French-born painter who explored the own paint medium using old techniques and had been on the staff of the Louvre.
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FEATURES
By Eric Siegel | March 21, 1991
One show scheduled for the fire-damaged Painters Mill Theatre in Owings Mills has been moved to Towson State University's Towson Center, but another has been canceled, the promoter said yesterday.The concert by the rock group Great White, scheduled for Monday at Painters Mill, has been moved to the Towson Center, said Michael Jaworek, spokesman for Chesapeake Concerts. The 8 p.m. starting time for the concert remains the same.But a show by Pilobolus, a modern dance troupe, scheduled for Painters Mill April 12, has been canceled because no appropriate venue could be found for the show, Mr. Jaworek said.
NEWS
By Will FespermanThe Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2014
Some 30 artists set up their easels all over Annapolis this past week, from quiet back alleys to the lawn of the Maryland State House. Intrigued local residents stopped to chat or simply stare. "Need a model in the picture?" one man shouted from across the street to Karen Scannell, 40, a painter from Ireland. The artists came to Annapolis to compete for a $3,000 prize in an open-air painting contest. Organized by the Annapolis-based nonprofit Maryland Federation of Art, the competition celebrates "plein air" painting - that is, painting outside.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2013
It's springtime, and with the beautiful weather and perfect light comes an age-old ritual as artists set up their easels around Maryland. You can find them working in a variety of mediums in Druid Hill Park, roadside in the Green Spring and Worthington valleys, along the winding stone-lined streets of Ellicott City, or on the wharves of St. Michaels and Rock Hall. And among the artists will be many members of the Baltimore Watercolor Society, the nation's third-oldest such organization.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | January 28, 1998
Joseph Thomas Slechter never considered screen painting to be trendy or down-home or Baltimore kitsch. He thought of his unique painting medium as a sure way to make extra cash.Mr. Slechter, who died Sunday of heart failure at his Perry Hall home, was one of the early Baltimore screen painters in the 1920s, when he began the quaint folk art that has remained popular locally, especially in east side communities. He was 93.Mr. Slechter was known for his plain but colorful screen paintings, usually a farm setting with a red barn or a red house, or of a lake with swans and ducks.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,Evening Sun Staff | March 22, 1991
Baltimore County police said today that four people have been arrested in connection with the arson fire Monday at Painters Mill Music Fair that caused an estimated $4 million in damage.Two of the suspects, escapees from a state minimum-security prison who were recaptured earlier this week, will be charged with actually setting the fire, police said.Bradley Spitler, 20, and William Harlow, 20, were being held at the House of Correction in Jessup on escape charges.The other two, Freddie Lee Ferguson, 28, of the 100 block of Wilgate Road in Owings Mills, and Debra Ann Mann, 23, of the 11000 block of Reisterstown Road, have been charged with breaking into the theater.
NEWS
By Richard Irwin and Joe Nawrozki and Richard Irwin and Joe Nawrozki,Evening Sun Staff Larry Carson contributed to this article | March 18, 1991
Baltimore County officials today were considering condemning the Painters Mill Music Fair in Owings Mills after an intentionally set, four-alarm fire extensively damaged the complex and brought down portions of the roof."
FEATURES
By Geoffrey Himes and Geoffrey Himes,Special to The Evening Sun | March 21, 1991
LAST SATURDAY, Chesapeake Concerts' major entry into the Baltimore concert scene was looking very smart indeed. That night's sold-out show for the Kentucky Headhunters at the Painters Mill theater was just the latest in a string of recent sellouts for the facility, coming on the heels of Bob Dylan, Slayer and Danzig.On Monday, that optimism turned to ash -- so to speak. A fire at the Painters Mill theater early that morning, apparently caused by, police say, a burglar attempting to break in with a blowtorch, caused an estimated $4 million in damage and left the venue unusable for the foreseeable future.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Natasha Lesser and Natasha Lesser,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 14, 2004
At the Brandywine River Museum, you have a choice. You can look at the stunning pastoral vistas depicted in the paintings of various American masters. Or you can step outside and take in some of the stunning pastoral vistas yourself. Or you can do both. The museum, which is in Chadds Ford, Pa., right outside Wilmington, Del., is in a renovated 19th-century gristmill overlooking the river. Full floor-to-ceiling windows provide an expansive view of the water below and the fields beyond. The building is surrounded by native trees, shrubs and wildflowers, which were planted by the Brandywine Conservancy, the environmental organization that runs the museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2014
Seth Adelsberger is a 34-year-old Baltimore painter and printmaker. He does not have a master's degree from an art school, he is not represented by a gallery, and he has not won a prestigious prize. Nonetheless, on Sunday, a solo show that distills Adelsberger's visual experiments over the past five years opens at the Baltimore Museum of Art . The exhibit is an unusual honor for an unproven painter, signaling to the art world nationwide that museum curators think Adelsberger is a talent worth watching.
NEWS
By Jessica Gregg and Baltimore Sun Media Group | April 25, 2014
Devin Mack was in a figurative drawing class at Ithaca College more than a decade ago when his professor handed him a roll of wire and said, "Here, make a figurative drawing out of this. " Mack, who was studying cinema and photography at the school, made his first sculpture and took the first step into a career. Today he continues to make wire sculpture "large and small" out of everything from coat hangers to precious metal. Indeed, probably one of his best known sculptures is a 12-foot-tall honeybee outside of Baltimore Honey, a community-supported apiary in Woodberry.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2013
It's talky, contrived and a little creaky, but John Logan's "Red," the two-actor play on the boards at Everyman Theatre , is also remarkably absorbing, even uplifting. Who knew art history could be so much fun? Sorry, that sounds flip. And "Red" is anything but flip. The Tony Award-winning work, set in the late 1950s, conjures up an encounter with Mark Rothko, the celebrated abstract expressionist who created the equivalent of epic operas from vast fields of color. On a single canvas, a few painstakingly applied shades interact with and within each other.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2013
Eric Z. Geiger, a painter and home improvement worker, died Friday of injuries sustained in an Owings Mills motorcycle accident. The Eldersburg resident was 29. After the accident, which occurred on Dolfield Road in Owings Mills, Mr. Geiger was transported to Northwest Hospita, where he died, said family members. Born in Baltimore and raised in Eldersburg, Eric Zachary Geiger was a 2002 graduate of Liberty High School. After high school, he attended a one-year Christian internship, discipleship and leadership program at Honor Academy in Garden Valley, Texas.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2013
It's springtime, and with the beautiful weather and perfect light comes an age-old ritual as artists set up their easels around Maryland. You can find them working in a variety of mediums in Druid Hill Park, roadside in the Green Spring and Worthington valleys, along the winding stone-lined streets of Ellicott City, or on the wharves of St. Michaels and Rock Hall. And among the artists will be many members of the Baltimore Watercolor Society, the nation's third-oldest such organization.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2013
Baltimore helped the avant-garde painter Max Weber forge a national reputation in 1915. Now, nearly 100 years later, this could be the city where the late artist begins his long-overdue comeback. It's not that critics and curators are unfamiliar with the Russian-born, Brooklyn-raised painter's work. As a new exhibit at the Baltimore Museum of Art makes clear, Weber has long been considered one of the most significant American artists of the 20th century. But, at the peak of his career, Weber was a bona fide celebrity, with spreads in "Time," "Life," "Look" and 'The Saturday Evening Post.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Nancy Forgione and Nancy Forgione,Special to the Sun | October 12, 2003
Hairstyles, clothing and manners may have changed radically since the 18th century, but certain essential aspects of human behavior remain much the same. The Age of Watteau, Chardin, and Fragonard: Masterpieces of French Genre Painting, an exhibition that opens today at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, illuminates that point, offering an appealing and comprehensive look at how men, women and children in 18th-century France whiled away their daily hours. The exhibition gathers together a hundred or so genre paintings -- scenes of everyday life -- by those three painters and others.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | August 25, 2001
DURING THE languid days of August, people seek thrills. Some sail in front of freighters, some swim near hungry sharks, some parachute onto national monuments. As for me, I have recently discovered the joy of pole painting. As the name suggests, pole painting consists of using an adjustable extension pole to apply paint to hard-to-reach surfaces. But the pole-painting experience is much more rich and varied than this simple explanation. There is, for example, the accompanying pleasure of pole sanding - roughing up surfaces with high-flying sandpaper - and the pure bliss that comes from pole edging, artfully painting pinnacle nooks and crannies.
NEWS
March 13, 2013
In a review of the Walters Art Museum show of paintings by 19 t h -century American artist Richard Caton Woodville, reporter Mary McCauley writes that "the real mystery ... is why so little about the painter is known today - even in his hometown" ("Walters explores work of Caton heir who lived fast, died young," March 9). However, the article does little to give readers a greater understanding of the painter or his works. Woodville challenged (and continues to challenge)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | March 9, 2013
The handsome young man sitting in the pink parlor chair radiates restlessness, a disdain for social conventions and undeniable self-satisfaction. The impatience in Richard Caton Woodville's "Self-Portrait with Flowered Wallpaper" can be detected in the wide-thrust knees of the artist born to a wealthy and prominent Baltimore family, and in his hastily buttoned and pointedly shabby jacket. His ego can be gleaned from the care he lavished on painting his face. Woodville imbued his visage with the high, broad forehead and aquiline nose that were thought in that age to signify a lofty mind and an aristocratic, resolute temperament.
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