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By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Contributing Writer/Los Angeles Times Syndicate | June 13, 1993
There's painted furniture, and then there's painted furniture.To some, it's simply a matter of giving a new look to an old but still-functional table or chair. Those of us familiar with the history of the decorative arts know, however, that painted furniture can be much more than the result of a spruce-up.For centuries, woodcarvers and cabinet makers have further embellished their creations with decorative designs in paint. Examples of this art form can be found in many parts of Asia and continental Europe as well as in England.
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By Jennifer K. Dansicker | November 28, 2011
Belle Patri means “beautiful home” and that's just what owner Jennifer Lane intended to market when she opened her Jarrettsville store of the same name in 2007. From French Country and Primitive to Shabby Chic, Vintage, and Traditional, Belle Patri has an eclectic mix of new, consigned, estate and antique home furnishings and accessories. “We have a very affordable pricing, and we have a lot of space to bring in a lot of pieces. We update our website everyday, so people can see what is actually in our store.” Lane, mother of two children, 10 and 8, and married to native Harford County resident Erik Lane, is known for refinishing and painting furniture.
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By Lita Solis-Cohen and Lita Solis-Cohen,Solis-Cohen Enterprises | March 29, 1992
Time has turned the table on painted furniture which used to be favored by thrifty buyers willing to put up with fakery. Today, genuine old paint-decorated pieces bring a premium over comparable ones of polished wood."
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By SAM SESSA | December 29, 2005
Gallery show With its new exhibit, the 2006 Annual All Member Show, the Artists' Gallery will present works from about 25 of its artists. Its 50-odd pieces will include drawings, paintings, stained glass, photography, pottery, metal sculpture and painted furniture. The exhibit opens Tuesday and runs through Jan. 27. There will be a reception 6 p.m.-8 p.m. Jan. 6. The gallery is at the American City Building, 10227 Wincopin Circle in Columbia. For more information, call 410-740-8249.
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By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | July 25, 1993
Baltimore's in the grip of a furniture fad. It's hip, it's happenin', it's now. And it's been that way for nearly 200 years.The fad is for painted furniture -- chairs with gilt filigree on arms and legs and landscapes in medallions on the crest rails, tables with compass stars on top, sofas with shields and arrows on wood framing, end tables with scenes of Mount Vernon, a wardrobe painted to look like a bank building, a child's chair and desk with every...
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | June 24, 2000
Tom Miller, a highly acclaimed Baltimore artist who invented a style of exuberant, brightly painted furniture known as "Afro-Deco," died yesterday at Joseph Richly Hospice in Baltimore after a long illness. He was 54. Miller's work was exhibited regularly in Baltimore galleries, and he enjoyed a devoted following among collectors here, who often waited up to two years to purchase examples of his work. Miller's furniture and sculpture were the subject of a major retrospective at the Baltimore Museum of Art and Maryland Art Place in 1995, and he was represented in several important group shows that toured the country.
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By Charlyne Varkonyi and Charlyne Varkonyi,FORT LAUDERDALE SUN-SENTINEL | December 31, 1995
From tiny custom shops to mass-market retailers, the centuries-old art of painted furniture is back, despite prices that can go from about $1,000 to $7,500 or more.Why now? Industry observers have different theories.Nancy High, director of communications for the American Furniture Manufacturers in High Point, N.C., sees it as a way for people to express their individuality in a high-tech world."When you collect art, it is an expression of your preferences and your taste," she says. "This furniture is art in a different medium.
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By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | February 18, 1996
The words "staid," "subtle," and "formal" are probably what come to mind when people think of American decorative arts of the 1700s. But there was a time, around the end of the 18th century, according to antiquarian Sumpter Priddy III, when everything from settees to symphonies got "wild, abstract and colorful."Instead of Sheraton, Williamsburg, Mozart, think of red paint, kaleidoscopes, Beethoven. For a time, the sober rationalism of the 18th century gave way to exuberant imagination. Quilts and plates showed up with bright geometric decoration.
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By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | June 4, 1995
The revival of interest in faux and decoratively painted furniture has gone on too long for it to be considered merely a fad. It's time, therefore, to offer some thoughts on how such pieces should -- and should not -- be used in the home.This is one of those instances in which it's best to be bold. Painted furniture can certainly serve as the focal point for an entire room.I'm not suggesting, however, that pieces of this sort should simply be plunked down in the living room with no concern as to whether they mesh with the overall design.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | December 29, 2005
Gallery show With its new exhibit, the 2006 Annual All Member Show, the Artists' Gallery will present works from about 25 of its artists. Its 50-odd pieces will include drawings, paintings, stained glass, photography, pottery, metal sculpture and painted furniture. The exhibit opens Tuesday and runs through Jan. 27. There will be a reception 6 p.m.-8 p.m. Jan. 6. The gallery is at the American City Building, 10227 Wincopin Circle in Columbia. For more information, call 410-740-8249.
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By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff | September 24, 2000
Refurnishing the White House When invading British troops set fire to the White House in 1814, many furnishings were lost, including a spectacular 42-piece "Grecian" suite for the Blue Room, dating from 1809. The painted furniture was designed by architect and designer Benjamin Latrobe, who decorated the room for the Madi-sons; it was built by Hugh and John Findlay, noted Baltimore furniture makers of the day. Some of those pieces will live again, thanks to the craftsmanship of David Wiesand, of McLain Wiesand Custom Furniture, and an exhibit at the Baltimore Museum of Art called "Politics, Power & Style: Art for the Presidents."
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | June 24, 2000
Tom Miller, a highly acclaimed Baltimore artist who invented a style of exuberant, brightly painted furniture known as "Afro-Deco," died yesterday at Joseph Richly Hospice in Baltimore after a long illness. He was 54. Miller's work was exhibited regularly in Baltimore galleries, and he enjoyed a devoted following among collectors here, who often waited up to two years to purchase examples of his work. Miller's furniture and sculpture were the subject of a major retrospective at the Baltimore Museum of Art and Maryland Art Place in 1995, and he was represented in several important group shows that toured the country.
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By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff | December 20, 1998
How did this happen? Suddenly it's Dec. 20, and you're still working on your holiday gift list. At this point, you don't just need gifts, you need inspiration! Our suggestion: Get off the beaten track. Here are some last-minute gifts from some lesser-known shops, where you just might find the perfect present for that hard-to-buy-for person.Comforts of homeOld-fashioned, handmade comforts of home abound at the Woman's Industrial Exchange shop, 333 N. Charles St. A double-bed quilt in bright primary colors and pastels in the traditional log-cabin pattern is $400.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | July 28, 1998
A remarkable card table recently acquired by the Baltimore Museum of Art relates to the art, architecture and history of Baltimore in the early 19th century.A painted card table of about 1815, it comes from a period when Baltimore was one of the leading centers of painted furniture. This unusual example has a large Chinese fishing scene on its top, and other scenes with Chinese characters painted on its front and side aprons.According to BMA curator of decorative arts, James A. Abbott, the only other examples of Baltimore painted furniture with Chinese scenes are two chairs believed to be from the same set as the card table and now owned by the Winterthur Museum near Wilmington.
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By Randi Kest and Randi Kest,SUN STAFF | April 5, 1998
Philadelphia turns back time as two annual antiques shows overlap April 17-22. The 23rd Street Armory Antiques Show, April 17-19, will showcase 40 American dealers. The Philadelphia Antiques Show at the 103rd Engineers Armory, April 18-22, will offer the exhibit "America's Painted and Gilded Legacy: 19th Century Painted Furniture."The Second Annual 23rd Street Armory Antiques Show, 22 S. 23rd St. between Market and Chestnut streets, will be open April 17, 11 a.m.-7 p.m.; April 18, 11 a.m.-8 p.m.; and April 19, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Admission is $15 on April 17 and $10 on April 18-19.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | September 11, 1997
This time around, let's relax and enjoy Tom Miller's painted furniture, currently on view at Steven Scott Gallery.Since about a decade ago, when the work of this Baltimore artist began to find an audience first locally and then on a national scale, it's been scrutinized, analyzed, solemnized quite enough.And all because it's so much fun. The old furniture that Miller finds and paints in his trademark Technicolor style has an immediate appeal that people tend to resist. Afraid somebody will think they're calling it superficial, they emphasize instead its serious side.
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By LINDA LOWE MORRIS | February 2, 1992
For the past six years the owners of fancy home furnishings shops from all over the world have journeyed to Washington to shop at the Heritage Market of American Crafts. Then last year Operation Desert Storm started just before the show, and many buyers stayed away."Everyone was hesitant to come into Washington, afraid they were going to be bombed," says show organizer Barbara Pitt. "The hotel had a fire drill, and I never saw a room clear out so fast in my life."This year, as compensation for the 150 craftspeople exhibiting, Ms. Pitt decided to open the show -- formerly to the trade only -- to the public on February 9 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. to give the craftspeople a chance to sell their show samples.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | May 12, 1993
If there's anybody out there who doesn't know about Tom Miller's wonderful painted furniture, run right to Steven Scott Gallery and make its acquaintance. That is, if you can get in, because all those who do know about Miller's work will probably be there already.Painted furniture had a great tradition in Baltimore in the 19th century, and the best of it was as high style as Baltimore ever got. Miller has turned the tables on this tradition by taking articles of already-made furniture and decorating them with partly deco-inspired but thoroughly original designs in the brightest of colors.
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By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | February 18, 1996
The words "staid," "subtle," and "formal" are probably what come to mind when people think of American decorative arts of the 1700s. But there was a time, around the end of the 18th century, according to antiquarian Sumpter Priddy III, when everything from settees to symphonies got "wild, abstract and colorful."Instead of Sheraton, Williamsburg, Mozart, think of red paint, kaleidoscopes, Beethoven. For a time, the sober rationalism of the 18th century gave way to exuberant imagination. Quilts and plates showed up with bright geometric decoration.
FEATURES
By Charlyne Varkonyi and Charlyne Varkonyi,FORT LAUDERDALE SUN-SENTINEL | December 31, 1995
From tiny custom shops to mass-market retailers, the centuries-old art of painted furniture is back, despite prices that can go from about $1,000 to $7,500 or more.Why now? Industry observers have different theories.Nancy High, director of communications for the American Furniture Manufacturers in High Point, N.C., sees it as a way for people to express their individuality in a high-tech world."When you collect art, it is an expression of your preferences and your taste," she says. "This furniture is art in a different medium.
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