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Paint Poisoning

NEWS
February 4, 1992
When health activists and landlords can agree to support a bill that would address the problem of lead paint poisoning, it's worth taking notice.Dels. Sandy Rosenberg and Virginia Thomas have introduced a bill in Annapolis that would set up a lead paint fund to compensate poisoning victims and provide for prevention through better code enforcement. Modeled on the worker's compensation concept, the fund would substitute a predictable scale of reimbursement for the current practice of providing remedies through case-by-case litigation.
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NEWS
February 2, 1994
The time has come to attack Maryland's lead-poisoning crisis. The economic effects of that crisis are as obvious as auction ads in your Sunday newspaper. Week after week, dozens of inner-city investment properties containing lead paint are advertised for sale because their owners no longer can get liability insurance or financing for them.Most of them do not find a purchaser, even though these properties would sell for next to nothing. Instead they are boarded up and added to the spiraling number of abandoned rowhouses that threaten the stability of once-vibrant neighborhoods and decrease the pool of affordable housing available to low-income families.
NEWS
Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2011
In a class action lawsuit filed Thursday, Kennedy Krieger Institute is accused of exposing poor black children to "dangerous levels" of lead as part of a housing experiment in the 1990s. The suit, filed Thursday in Baltimore City Circuit Court by attorney Billy Murphy, accuses the instituteof negligence, fraud, battery and violating the state's consumer protection act. It seeks damages, interest and unspecified attorney fees. The hospital "used these children as known guinea pigs in these contaminated houses to complete this study," the suit states.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2012
A Baltimore jury on Wednesday awarded $1.3 million in damages to a 17-year-old girl, finding that negligence by the Housing Authority of Baltimore City was a substantial factor in lead-paint poisoning she suffered as a young girl. Amafica Woodland lived in a now-demolished house in the Flag House Courts housing project in East Baltimore until she was nearly 3. Her attorney, Scott Nevin, said he expected the award to be reduced to $690,000 because of a state cap on non-economic damages.
NEWS
November 14, 2000
Sun staff writer Jim Haner has been named the winner of the Excellence in Urban Journalism Award, given by the Enterprise Foundation and the Freedom Forum, for his 1999 series on an East Baltimore neighborhood known as "Zombieland." The honor, awarded yesterday at the Enterprise Foundation's annual convention in Atlanta, was for an investigation into how drug dealers and other criminals threaten urban renewal efforts by buying up slum rental houses. Haner's stories also focused attention on the continuing epidemic of lead paint poisoning, from which some 1,200 children suffer every year in Baltimore's inner-city neighborhoods.
NEWS
October 26, 2012
In his recent commentary, Robert Embry uses Baltimore City public health initiatives to make the point that there are some things only government could accomplish ("Government does good; here's proof," Oct. 24). I disagree. Except for the lead paint poisoning example, these do not serve the greater majority of us as taxpayers in this state. Baltimore's historically high infection rates for AIDS, syphilis, and the parental decision to not have their children vaccinated for mumps and measles all point to immoral or risky behaviors and parental choice not to follow the common sense health guidelines that the majority of us follow.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | January 4, 2002
The Housing Authority of Baltimore City is not immune from lawsuits arising from lead paint poisoning even though its liability insurance no longer covers such claims, Maryland's intermediate appellate court ruled yesterday. The ruling came in four cases in which children who lived in or visited houses operated by the authority experienced elevated blood lead levels after being exposed to lead paint. The authority's lead paint liability coverage was terminated by its insurance carrier nearly five years ago. Without such insurance, the agency argued that it would not be able to satisfy any judgment issued against it and thus should be immune from being sued.
BUSINESS
By ROBERT J. TERRY and ROBERT J. TERRY,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 9, 2003
A Columbia-based housing organization that has worked to reduce lead-paint poisoning in children is expanding to focus on other health problems as it marks its first decade of work. The National Center for Healthy Housing - launched in 1992 by the Enterprise Foundation, the philanthropic organization founded by developer James Rouse - has authored groundbreaking studies of lead-paint hazards in federally subsidized and low-income housing. The group celebrated its 10th anniversary last week as it was being named one of seven organizations sharing a total of $6.5 million in U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development grants.
NEWS
By Martin C. Evans | August 21, 1991
A coalition of environmental activists said yesterday that it will urge its 8,000 Baltimore members to vote for candidates the coalition believes will address urban environmental issues such as lead paint poisoning, recycling and emissions from the Pulaski Highway incinerator.The coalition -- which includes the Sierra Club and Clean Water Action -- endorsed Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke and City Council President Mary Pat Clarke for re-election. It backed Councilman Joseph T. "Jody" Landers III, D-3rd, for comptroller.
BUSINESS
February 17, 2002
The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development is granting $10 million nationwide to defray the cost of lead testing on houses to assist compliance with new federal safety regulations. Baltimore conducts more than 1,000 lead abatements every year, of which several hundred are eligible to receive money toward post-abatement dust testing. The city has not calculated how much it will get, said Dr. Peter L. Beilenson, Baltimore health commissioner. "We're already doing clearance tests," said Beilenson.
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