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NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 9, 2001
NEW ORLEANS - NAACP President Kweisi Mfume is expected to announce a plan tomorrow to sue the lead paint industry as well as cities and states that fail to abide by federal and state regulations. It was not clear last night whether Baltimore or Maryland would be included in the proposed legal action. But in a prepared statement that Mfume will read at a news conference during the NAACP's 92nd annual convention, he mentions Baltimore numerous times, and he names a West Baltimore boy who suffers from lead paint poisoning.
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FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | April 9, 2012
A bill that would require landlords with units built before 1978 to protect their tenants from lead-paint hazards cleared the General Assembly tonight, along with a provision urging courts to penalize baseless litigation over the problem. HB644 , approved in a conference agreement by House and Senate, would extend lead-paint regulations that now cover all rental homes in Maryland built before 1950. The bill also authorizes the state to regulate repairs, renovations and painting in all homes where lead paint is present.
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NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson and Jim Haner and M. Dion Thompson and Jim Haner,SUN STAFF | July 10, 2001
Imani Studivant was only a toddler when the poison entered her body, borne by chips and dust containing traces of lead paint. Now, at age 7, the West Baltimore girl has a slight speech impediment and could suffer effects that would be with her for the rest of her life. The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People has pointed to Imani as one example of the thousands of children already poisoned and the thousands more who are damaged every year. Today, NAACP President Kweisi Mfume is expected to announce a plan to sue the lead paint industry as well as cities and states that fail to abide by federal and state regulations.
NEWS
September 23, 2011
Thanks for the beautiful obituary on local activist Dennis Livingston, a generous, creative person with an insatiable drive to help people and improve the community ("Dennis Livingston," Sept. 21). What better tribute to his life than for his story to appear opposite an article reporting a reduction in lead paint poisoning among Baltimore children. Through his activism, Dennis had a big role in saving those children from a lifetime of disability. Charlie Cooper, Baltimore
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | March 15, 2002
NAACP President Kweisi Mfume asked the General Assembly yesterday to support a proposal setting stricter standards for landlords owning property that contain high levels of lead dust. Mfume said the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People has made eliminating lead paint poisoning a priority, and that Maryland needs to do more to protect children from the danger. "We believe it is a basic right of all Americans to live and grow in public and privately owned housing that is free from the contamination associated with lead paint and its residue," Mfume told the House Environmental Matters Committee.
NEWS
By Annapolis Bureau | March 21, 1992
LEAD PAINT POISONINGHouse votes to study extent, treatmentThe House of Delegates yesterday voted 119-5 for a study of lead paint poisoning, which has been called the top environmental threat to children's health.The study would seek to determine the extent of lead poisoning exists in Maryland and the costs of compensating victims and treatment. It would be monitored by a 15-member commission that would recommend a way to pay for treatment.The bill now goes to the state Senate.The study would be paid for by a $5-per-unit fee charged to the owners of rental houses and apartments built before 1978.
NEWS
September 23, 2011
Thanks for the beautiful obituary on local activist Dennis Livingston, a generous, creative person with an insatiable drive to help people and improve the community ("Dennis Livingston," Sept. 21). What better tribute to his life than for his story to appear opposite an article reporting a reduction in lead paint poisoning among Baltimore children. Through his activism, Dennis had a big role in saving those children from a lifetime of disability. Charlie Cooper, Baltimore
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau | February 27, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- The paint industry turned out in force yesterday to protest a proposed tax on paint, saying it is being singled out to pay for a cure for the statewide problem of lead paint poisoning.Paint store owners said they'll lose business as the cost of paint goes up by 50 or 60 cents a gallon, contractors said the state will lose tax revenue because they'll be forced to buy their paints in neighboring states, and manufacturers said a paint tax could force them to close brand-name stores and put employees out of work.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Sun Staff Writer | May 1, 1995
Howard County leads the state in overall care of children, but it's not perfect, says a recent report comparing the well-being of children across Maryland."
BUSINESS
By Michael Gisriel | October 23, 1994
Q: I own several rental properties in the Baltimore area. I heard something recently about a new state registration law regarding houses that may contain lead paint. How will the law affect landlords?James Graham, BaltimoreA: The new law (HB760) was passed by the General Assembly last spring and took effect on Oct. 1. The law establishes a lead paint poisoning prevention program that will be managed by the Maryland Department of the Environment.The law requires owners of older rental properties to take certain actions to attain limited liability protection and more affordable insurance.
HEALTH
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2011
Lead poisoning, once widespread, appears on the way to becoming a rarity among children living in old rental housing in Baltimore and the rest of Maryland. But the problem is growing among youngsters who live in owner-occupied and newer rental homes, and that is prompting state officials to look for new ways to fight the longtime health scourge. State environmental officials reported Tuesday that the number of Maryland children found last year with harmful levels of lead in their blood declined to 531, down by 22 from the year before and less than 0.5 percent of all youngsters tested.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2011
The chairman of a City Council committee says he will ask federal officials to push Baltimore's public housing agency to pay a six-figure judgment for lead-paint poisoning, saying the agency had effectively stuck its tongue out by refusing to budge on the issue. The dispute is the latest development in a story that came to light in April, when housing authority executive director Paul T. Graziano said the cash-strapped agency could not, and would not, pay nearly $12 million in court-ordered lead poisoning judgments against it. Councilman James B. Kraft said Thursday that he was "very dissatisfied" with Graziano's refusal to seek federal approval to pay one judgment in particular — a $200,000 consent judgment involving a former public housing resident named Daron E. Goods.
NEWS
April 11, 2011
The Mayor and Housing Authority of Baltimore's insist that they cannot pay court judgments for victims of lead paint is unconscionable, unjust and completely unacceptable. I am shocked and outraged that the Mayor of Baltimore and the Housing Authority of Baltimore will not stand up for the most vulnerable citizens of Baltimore: the children. How can the Housing Authority and the Mayor turn their backs on the victims and disregard the rule of law? The Mayor and the Housing Authority Board members have taken a solemn oath of office to uphold the laws of the State of Maryland and they should do just that, uphold the law. What is more troubling is the clear pattern of mismanagement by the Administration and the Housing Authority on the issue of lead paint.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | July 31, 2003
Hoping to build General Assembly support for tougher lead paint regulations, advocates took lawmakers on a tour of several East Baltimore rowhouses yesterday to illustrate the importance of holding landlords accountable for their properties. The afternoon event - organized by the Kennedy Krieger Institute and the Coalition to End Childhood Lead Poisoning - gave a dozen members of the House of Delegates a chance to see a home in which three children were recently poisoned, as well as two other homes in various stages of being cleaned up. Supporters of stricter state legislation said they hope the first-hand experience will persuade lawmakers to back legislation that failed during this year's legislative session.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | March 15, 2002
NAACP President Kweisi Mfume asked the General Assembly yesterday to support a proposal setting stricter standards for landlords owning property that contain high levels of lead dust. Mfume said the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People has made eliminating lead paint poisoning a priority, and that Maryland needs to do more to protect children from the danger. "We believe it is a basic right of all Americans to live and grow in public and privately owned housing that is free from the contamination associated with lead paint and its residue," Mfume told the House Environmental Matters Committee.
NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson and Jim Haner and M. Dion Thompson and Jim Haner,SUN STAFF | July 10, 2001
Imani Studivant was only a toddler when the poison entered her body, borne by chips and dust containing traces of lead paint. Now, at age 7, the West Baltimore girl has a slight speech impediment and could suffer effects that would be with her for the rest of her life. The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People has pointed to Imani as one example of the thousands of children already poisoned and the thousands more who are damaged every year. Today, NAACP President Kweisi Mfume is expected to announce a plan to sue the lead paint industry as well as cities and states that fail to abide by federal and state regulations.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau | February 27, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- The paint industry turned out in force yesterday to protest a proposed tax on paint, saying it is being singled out to pay for a cure for the statewide problem of lead paint poisoning.Paint store owners said they'll lose business as the cost of paint goes up by 50 or 60 cents a gallon; contractors said the state will lose tax revenue because they'll be forced to buy their paints in neighboring states; and manufacturers said a paint tax could force them to close brand-name stores and put employees out of work.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | January 21, 1998
A group that fights lead poisoning said yesterday that it will work with Baltimore police to train children, parents and police officers how to detect and prevent the childhood hazard."
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 9, 2001
NEW ORLEANS - NAACP President Kweisi Mfume is expected to announce a plan tomorrow to sue the lead paint industry as well as cities and states that fail to abide by federal and state regulations. It was not clear last night whether Baltimore or Maryland would be included in the proposed legal action. But in a prepared statement that Mfume will read at a news conference during the NAACP's 92nd annual convention, he mentions Baltimore numerous times, and he names a West Baltimore boy who suffers from lead paint poisoning.
NEWS
By Jim Haner and Jim Haner,SUN STAFF | October 8, 2000
In a city where more than 20,000 children have been exposed to brain-damaging doses of lead paint in the past two decades, officials acknowledged last week that no effort has been made to track them - and that many have likely passed into the prison system unnoticed. Unaware of the mental deficits of the defendants who appear before them, judges routinely shuttle lead-poisoning victims into the criminal justice system without educational or medical treatments that might help them overcome their affliction.
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