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By Timothy B. Wheeler and William F. Zorzi Jr. and Timothy B. Wheeler and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | January 28, 2000
Two Baltimore lawmakers are backing legislation that would make it easier for victims of lead poisoning to sue manufacturers of lead-based paint for damages. The bill -- which would hold paint manufacturers responsible for harming thousands of Maryland children based on how much lead-based paint they sold in the state -- would help Baltimore attorney Peter G. Angelos pursue two lawsuits he has filed against the pigment industry. Del. Samuel I. Rosenberg said yesterday that he is drafting a bill that would allow "market-share liability" claims against lead-paint manufacturers in Maryland courts.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | February 8, 2009
George Johnson Ross III, a retired paint manufacturer, died of a stroke Jan. 29 at St. Joseph's Medical Center. The Lutherville resident was 79. Born in Frederick, he earned a history degree at Virginia Polytechnic Institute. He served in the Army and was stationed in Germany from 1952 to 1954. Mr. Ross became an executive with the old C.M. Athey Paint Company in Southwest Baltimore and was a past president of the Baltimore Paint and Coatings Association. He belonged to the Baltimore Country Club, where he played golf, cards and bowled.
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NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,Annapolis Bureau | March 18, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Stymied by industry opposition, a Maryland House committee yesterday scuttled a proposal to charge paint manufacturers for the cost of dealing with lead paint poisoning in favor of a study of the problem.A series of amendments transformed the measure into yet another study of what has been called the number one environmental threat to the health of children. The study would be monitored by a 15-member commission that would also recommend a way to pay for the treatment of lead paint victims.
NEWS
By Larry Atkins | September 14, 2000
PHILADELPHIA -- For decades, it's been the stealth epidemic. Now, a battle is being waged to combat lead poisoning. But are we fighting the wrong enemy by going after the paint companies? While the number of lead poisoning cases for children under age 6 has dropped from 14.8 million in 1978 (the year lead paint was banned) to 890,000 today, lead poisoning remains a serious problem. More than 7,000 children are exposed to lead paint in Baltimore each year, and 1,200 are poisoned. Poor children are five times more likely than others to have high blood-lead levels.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | June 23, 2000
I ARRIVE IN the federal courthouse in downtown Baltimore, fresh from Pratt Street, which is splashed in the colors of hundreds of conventioneering square dancers - there are as many as 15,000 here - and tourists hustling down to the harbor for OpSail. Despite the surreal allure of the street, I take a seat in Courtroom 5C - very nice, by the way - and there's Gerry Evans, the big-shot Annapolis lobbyist on trial for mail fraud. Evans wears a dark suit and shoes with tassels - very nice, by the way - and, now and then, he slips a peek at his wristwatch, and I try to imagine what this guy must be thinking: time and money.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Thomas W. Waldron and Greg Garland and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | May 12, 1999
While few if any legislators, lobbyists or activists knew that Del. Tony E. Fulton planned last fall to introduce sweeping legislation targeting lead paint manufacturers, one person who had advance knowledge was lobbyist Gerard E. Evans.And Evans, the highest-paid lobbyist in Annapolis, made sure that his paint company clients knew, too.Evans obtained a copy of an October letter from Fulton to Baltimore Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke outlining his proposed bill and forwarded it to at least two of his clients -- paint manufacturers that would have been hurt by the legislation, sources with the companies told The Sun.Those two companies and two other paint manufacturers paid Evans a combined $135,000 since November 1996 to ward off such legislation, state records show.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | March 10, 2000
Maryland's leading corporate lobbyists flocked to a House committee yesterday to urge lawmakers to kill legislation that would make it easier for individuals and governments to recover damages from manufacturers of toxic lead paint. The bill -- which could open the door to lawsuits rivaling those that led to the national tobacco settlement -- drew opposition from business groups ranging from the Chamber of Commerce to Bell Atlantic Corp. to paint makers themselves. The lobbyists were bolstered by the support of former U.S. Attorney General Benjamin R. Civiletti as they tried to head off a proposal they denounced as an effort to enrich trial lawyers.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2000
Annapolis lobbyist Gerard E. Evans' message to the paint companies was clear: They needed his services badly, given what the lobbyist had learned in a meeting with Baltimore Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke. In an August 1998 letter to several paint manufacturers, Evans said Schmoke had told him of plans to put his political influence behind legislation that would make it easier for victims of lead poisoning to sue the companies. But yesterday, in videotaped testimony in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, Schmoke said he recalled no such meeting with Evans.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2000
Annapolis lobbyist Gerard E. Evans' message to the paint companies was clear: They needed his services badly, given what the lobbyist had learned in a meeting with Baltimore Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke. In an August 1998 letter to several paint manufacturers, Evans said Schmoke had told him of plans to put his political influence behind legislation that would make it easier for victims of lead poisoning to sue the companies. But yesterday, in videotaped testimony in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, Schmoke said he recalled no such meeting with Evans.
NEWS
By Larry Atkins | September 14, 2000
PHILADELPHIA -- For decades, it's been the stealth epidemic. Now, a battle is being waged to combat lead poisoning. But are we fighting the wrong enemy by going after the paint companies? While the number of lead poisoning cases for children under age 6 has dropped from 14.8 million in 1978 (the year lead paint was banned) to 890,000 today, lead poisoning remains a serious problem. More than 7,000 children are exposed to lead paint in Baltimore each year, and 1,200 are poisoned. Poor children are five times more likely than others to have high blood-lead levels.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | June 23, 2000
I ARRIVE IN the federal courthouse in downtown Baltimore, fresh from Pratt Street, which is splashed in the colors of hundreds of conventioneering square dancers - there are as many as 15,000 here - and tourists hustling down to the harbor for OpSail. Despite the surreal allure of the street, I take a seat in Courtroom 5C - very nice, by the way - and there's Gerry Evans, the big-shot Annapolis lobbyist on trial for mail fraud. Evans wears a dark suit and shoes with tassels - very nice, by the way - and, now and then, he slips a peek at his wristwatch, and I try to imagine what this guy must be thinking: time and money.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2000
Annapolis lobbyist Gerard E. Evans' message to the paint companies was clear: They needed his services badly, given what the lobbyist had learned in a meeting with Baltimore Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke. In an August 1998 letter to several paint manufacturers, Evans said Schmoke had told him of plans to put his political influence behind legislation that would make it easier for victims of lead poisoning to sue the companies. But yesterday, in videotaped testimony in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, Schmoke said he recalled no such meeting with Evans.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2000
Annapolis lobbyist Gerard E. Evans' message to the paint companies was clear: They needed his services badly, given what the lobbyist had learned in a meeting with Baltimore Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke. In an August 1998 letter to several paint manufacturers, Evans said Schmoke had told him of plans to put his political influence behind legislation that would make it easier for victims of lead poisoning to sue the companies. But yesterday, in videotaped testimony in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, Schmoke said he recalled no such meeting with Evans.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | March 11, 2000
A bill that would have made it easier to collect damages from paint manufacturers for the harm caused by lead poisoning was defeated last night in a House of Delegates committee in Annapolis. The measure, which had drawn strong opposition from business groups as well as from manufacturers, was turned down without debate by a unanimous vote of the House Judiciary Committee. The defeat was a setback for the law firm of Peter G. Angelos, which hopes to force the lead paint industry to pay damages on a scale similar to the billions of dollars in the national tobacco settlement.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and William F. Zorzi Jr. and Timothy B. Wheeler and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | January 28, 2000
Two Baltimore lawmakers are backing legislation that would make it easier for victims of lead poisoning to sue manufacturers of lead-based paint for damages. The bill -- which would hold paint manufacturers responsible for harming thousands of Maryland children based on how much lead-based paint they sold in the state -- would help Baltimore attorney Peter G. Angelos pursue two lawsuits he has filed against the pigment industry. Del. Samuel I. Rosenberg said yesterday that he is drafting a bill that would allow "market-share liability" claims against lead-paint manufacturers in Maryland courts.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Caitlin Francke and Scott Shane and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | September 21, 1999
Targeting another deep-pockets industry, Baltimore attorney Peter G. Angelos filed two lawsuits yesterday to force paint manufacturers to remove lead paint from a million Maryland homes and to pay millions of dollars in damages to six lead-poisoned Baltimore children.Both lawsuits, filed in Baltimore Circuit Court, allege that manufacturers conspired for more than a half-century to hide the hazards of lead poisoning and defeat proposed restrictions on lead-based paint.The suits represent a major assault on paint manufacturers by an attorney who has won hundreds of millions of dollars in similar litigation against the asbestos and tobacco industries.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Caitlin Francke and Scott Shane and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | September 21, 1999
Targeting another deep-pockets industry, Baltimore attorney Peter G. Angelos filed two lawsuits yesterday to force paint manufacturers to remove lead paint from a million Maryland homes and to pay millions of dollars in damages to six lead-poisoned Baltimore children.Both lawsuits, filed in Baltimore Circuit Court, allege that manufacturers conspired for more than a half-century to hide the hazards of lead poisoning and defeat proposed restrictions on lead-based paint.The suits represent a major assault on paint manufacturers by an attorney who has won hundreds of millions of dollars in similar litigation against the asbestos and tobacco industries.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Thomas W. Waldron and Greg Garland and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | May 12, 1999
While few if any legislators, lobbyists or activists knew that Del. Tony E. Fulton planned last fall to introduce sweeping legislation targeting lead paint manufacturers, one person who had advance knowledge was lobbyist Gerard E. Evans.And Evans, the highest-paid lobbyist in Annapolis, made sure that his paint company clients knew, too.Evans obtained a copy of an October letter from Fulton to Baltimore Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke outlining his proposed bill and forwarded it to at least two of his clients -- paint manufacturers that would have been hurt by the legislation, sources with the companies told The Sun.Those two companies and two other paint manufacturers paid Evans a combined $135,000 since November 1996 to ward off such legislation, state records show.
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