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By Mike Preston and The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2014
First, there was a lawsuit about concussions. Now, more than 500 retired NFL players have filed a lawsuit claiming teams provided them with illegal drugs , including narcotics and pain killers, that caused medical complications down the road. The suit alleges that the league " has intentionally, recklessly and negligently created and maintained a culture of drug misuse, substituting players' health for profit. " To me, this appears to be a bunch of former players who keep wanting to tap into the seemingly endless amount of money the NFL is making these days.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
Reading one of Jennifer Weiner's contemporary novels of manners is a bit like biting into an apple. The experience is full of flavor, more crisp than juicy, and refreshingly tart. Partly, that's because the novels typically are narrated by a heroine who, like Weiner herself, is an acute and witty observer of social norms into which she doesn't quite fit. Weiner's 10th novel, "All Fall Down," features Allison Weiss, who has everything she once wanted - a husband and daughter she loves, an interesting job, a stately house in the suburbs - but finds herself sliding into an addiction to prescription pain medication.
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NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Sun Staff Writer | August 25, 1994
A state disciplinary board has charged an emergency room physician at Carroll County General Hospital with illegally prescribing a painkiller to the relative of a nurse.The Maryland Board of Physician Quality Assurance alleges that the doctor prescribed the painkiller Dilaudid at the request of the nurse, who was addicted to the drug.The board filed charges Tuesday against Dr. Robert L. Gossweiler, 61, an attending physician in Carroll County General's emergency room.According to the charging papers, in December 1993 a nurse in the hospital's emergency department asked Dr. Gossweiler to prescribe a painkiller for a relative who had been diagnosed with inoperable cancer.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2014
With only a few rum bars available to choose from in this town, there are even fewer still that provide one of the more iconic selections known to man: the Painkiller. Woody's Rum Bar and Island Grill, we thank you. Thought to be an invention of the British Virgin Islands in the 1970s, a traditional Painkiller consists of one, two or more-dangerous three parts - denoted by No. 1, 2 and 3 - of Pusser's dark rum, coconut cream (ooh), orange juice (aaah) and pineapple juice (what?
NEWS
By MATTHEW DOLAN | March 9, 2006
A 28-year-old Anne Arundel County woman was sentenced to more than two years in prison yesterday for her role in a scheme to obtain prescription painkillers illegally. Elizabeth Kiss of Glen Burnie pleaded guilty last month to health care fraud for accumulating more than 40 prescriptions under false pretenses and to possession with intent to distribute OxyContin. Federal prosecutors said Kiss visited several physicians, each time requesting pain medication for reflex sympathetic dystrophy.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | March 6, 1997
County police arrested a Pasadena woman Tuesday on charges of more than doubling the number of painkillers called for in a prescription.Belinda Marie Glock, 23, of the 7600 block of Cedar Drive was charged with altering a prescription and attempting to obtain drugs by fraud.Police said she tried to have falsified prescriptions for Percocet, a powerful painkiller, filled at two Revco pharmacies.In the first incident, about 1: 30 p.m. Tuesday, a woman handed Valerie Coons, a pharmacist at the Revco in the 8500 block of Fort Smallwood Road, a prescription that had been changed from 18 to 48 Percocet tablets.
NEWS
By Linda Marsa and Linda Marsa,Special to the Sun | October 21, 2001
A powerful and potentially addictive painkiller used by millions of Americans is causing rapid hearing loss, even deafness, in some patients who are misusing the drug, according to hearing researchers in Los Angeles and elsewhere. So far, at least 48 patients have been identified by doctors at the House Ear Institute in Los Angeles and several other medical centers who have treated patients with sudden hearing loss. The hearing problems appear to be limited to people who abuse Vicodin and other chemically comparable prescription drugs by taking exceptionally high dosages for several months or more, doctors said.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | April 18, 2002
A former physician's assistant at Perry Point Veterans Affairs Medical Center pleaded guilty yesterday in federal court to illegally obtaining the restricted painkiller oxycodone by writing prescriptions for patients at the Cecil County facility and then splitting the drugs with them. Thaddeus J. Kuszmar, 50, of Rising Sun also pleaded guilty to falsely altering his Navy discharge papers to reflect service in Vietnam, so that he could receive VA benefits for post-traumatic stress disorder.
NEWS
By Tyler Marshall and Tyler Marshall,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 20, 2004
WASHINGTON - The head of the pharmaceutical company that produces the arthritis painkiller Celebrex argued yesterday that the drug still had an important role in medical treatment despite a federal warning that its use could promote heart attacks. "We need to put the cardiovascular risk in perspective here," Pfizer Inc.'s chairman and chief executive officer, Hank McKinnell, said on ABC's This Week. "For millions of patients, Celebrex is the best option, or in some cases, the last option to live a normal life with the pain and inflammation of arthritis."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 13, 2005
In an apparent setback for Merck, a federal judge in Houston declared a mistrial yesterday in Plunkett v. Merck, the third Vioxx lawsuit to reach trial, after jurors said they were deadlocked. The panel of nine jurors had debated for about 18 hours on Thursday, Friday and Saturday. The lawsuit was brought by Evelyn Irvin Plunkett, the widow of Richard Irvin Jr., who died at age 53 in May 2001 after taking the Merck painkiller Vioxx for less than a month. Judge Eldon E. Fallon of U.S. District Court declared a mistrial and sent jurors home yesterday morning after they reported they could not reach a verdict.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2014
Towson gynecologist Dr. John Yacoub pleaded guilty Wednesday to illegally dispensing narcotic painkillers to his girlfriend and two others, according to federal court documents. Under a plea agreement, the former OB/GYN and surgeon at Greater Baltimore Medical Center and Saint Agnes Hospital avoids a trial and could receive a reduced sentence, according to the documents. The maximum penalty he faces under federal guidelines is 20 years in prison and a $1 million fine. Federal authorities began investigating Yacoub last year based on a tip from a member of his staff who reported that he kept large bottles of drugs, considered controlled dangerous substances under federal law, in his office.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2014
First, there was a lawsuit about concussions. Now, more than 500 retired NFL players have filed a lawsuit claiming teams provided them with illegal drugs , including narcotics and pain killers, that caused medical complications down the road. The suit alleges that the league " has intentionally, recklessly and negligently created and maintained a culture of drug misuse, substituting players' health for profit. " To me, this appears to be a bunch of former players who keep wanting to tap into the seemingly endless amount of money the NFL is making these days.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2012
A Dundalk woman who died after she drove her car the wrong way onto the Baltimore Beltway, striking another vehicle and killing a 3-year-old last month, had alcohol and painkillers in her blood, a police spokesman said. Toxicology tests showed Victoria Lynn DeAngelo, 21, had a 0.18 blood alcohol content and presence of the painkiller Tramadol, said Maryland Transportation Authority Police spokesman Sgt. Jonathan Green, citing a report from the office of the chief medical examiner. DeAngelo and 3-year-old Lily Joseven Kelley of White Marsh died as a result of the Nov. 25 crash.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,stephanie.desmon@baltsun.com | July 13, 2009
When a Food and Drug Administration panel took steps last month to reduce consumption of the popular painkiller acetaminophen, warning that too many people are inadvertently taking more than is safe and suffering liver damage and even death, Dr. David Maine's phones started ringing. And ringing. Patients wanted to know if taking Tylenol once a day is too much (it is not). They wanted to know if their prescriptions contain the drug (some do). "We've gotten a ton of calls," said Maine, a pain management specialist at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | July 1, 2009
A Reisterstown pharmacist was arrested Tuesday morning on federal charges claiming he illegally sold more than 23,000 prescription pills. The amount is the equivalent of 63 kilograms of cocaine or nearly 28,000 pounds of marijuana, federal authorities said. A six-count indictment, unsealed Tuesday, alleges that Ketankumar Arvind Patel, 47, used his Medicine Shoppe Pharmacy at 11813 1/2 Reisterstown Road to fill phony prescriptions for the anti-anxiety medication Xanax, along with thousands of Oxycontin and Percocet pills, both of which contain oxycodone.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun Reporter | June 10, 2008
Two pharmacists accused of selling nearly 10 million addictive painkillers illegally over the Internet were portrayed yesterday by a federal prosecutor as having been involved in "a monster of a conspiracy" and by defense attorneys as merely taking advantage of the vast reach of cyberspace to succeed in a legitimate business. The two men, Steven Abiodun Sodipo, 51, of Forest Hill and Callixtus Onigbo Nwaehiri, 48, of Jarrettsville, were indicted in September on charges of dispensing hydrocodone - which commonly sells as Vicodin - under bogus prescriptions to clients all over the country from their Baltimore pharmacy, Newcare Home Health Service.
NEWS
By Lynda Richardson and Lynda Richardson,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 16, 2000
ROCHESTER, N.Y. -- The University of Rochester had ambitions to be a national powerhouse in medical research. And it had charted a meticulous 10-year plan to get there: Get more research money from the National Institutes of Health, recruit 100 more biomedical scientists and construct two research buildings. Then came the jackpot. In April, the university announced that it had been awarded a broad patent covering the use of a new type of painkiller that could bring in billions of dollars in royalties.
NEWS
By SUSAN CARPENTER and SUSAN CARPENTER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 20, 2005
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- Johnathan Wendel is in training. Eight hours a day, seven days a week, he sits in his basement, gunning down opponents in the video game Painkiller. About the only time he leaves his house is for a daily three-mile run. Then it's back to the basement for round after bloody round of the first-person shooter game in which the player becomes the gunman. Wendel, or Fatal1ty as he is known in the competitive gaming world, is a professional cybersportsman known for his skillful aim. At the Cyberathlete Professional League's World Tour Grand Finals, kicking off in New York today, he hopes to take the $150,000 first prize, adding to the $86,000 he has already earned competing in live tournaments this year.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 20, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The government proposed yesterday stronger safety warnings for nonprescription painkillers found in most family medicine cabinets, as well as in many an office drawer and gym bag, including aspirin, Tylenol, Advil, Motrin and Aleve. The Food and Drug Administration said it was concerned that consumers were poorly informed about serious and potentially fatal complications from misusing the medications, although the risks are well known to healthcare professionals. "Acetaminophen is an enormous problem in the United States and overshadows prescription drug toxicity," said Dr. William M. Lee of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, a nationally recognized expert on liver failure.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun reporter | December 8, 2006
Using brain scans, acupuncture and the nasty stuff that puts the sting in pepper spray, researchers are learning how placebos play out in our brains. These innocuous medications - long used as decoys in clinical drug trials - aren't supposed to have real chemical effect on the body. But experience over the years has taught doctors that some patients who take placebos experience real relief. Now brain scans show that when test subjects think a placebo is a real medication or treatment, the expectation of relief can release natural painkillers.
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