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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2010
Patricia Kowalczyk had been suffering with neck and shoulder pain for years when her doctor offered her a shot of Botox. The 60-year-old wasn't interested in smoothing her frown lines. But Johns Hopkins' Dr. Paul Christo wasn't offering the popular cosmetic procedure most often associated with the botulinum toxin that paralyzes nerves and muscles. He wanted to give her one small, carefully aimed dose to knock out the ache that made daily activity a chore. "Most of the public doesn't realize Botox is used for medical purposes," said Christo, an assistant professor of anesthesiology and critical care medicine in Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine's division of pain medicine.
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NEWS
Dr. Martin Wasserman | March 27, 2014
Staffers passing by a room in the U.S. House of Representatives office building earlier this month did double takes. Whom they saw inside were no ordinary Capitol Hill briefing attendees: rats, mice, guinea pigs and rabbits. The presence of these animals in the halls of Congress evidences a paradigm shift that could forever change how we protect public health in America. It's one of many developments this month that signal progress toward a safer future. Congressman James Moran (D-Va.)
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NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2012
An estimated 3.5 million cancer patients around the globe are in severe pain from their disease, but many get no relief. In poor countries the cost is considered too high for drugs like morphine when such opioids are often stolen, abused or not taken according to instruction. But some Johns Hopkins University scientists have been working on a solution for those patients, as well as some in the United States, that uses a flexible button-sized disk implanted under the skin that releases consistent doses of painkiller over a month.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2014
The chairman of a commission set up to oversee the implementation of a medical marijuana program told lawmakers Thursday that the initiative is at least 18 months away from offering pain relief to the first patients. Even with that much time, it is by no means certain that the program will get off the ground, said Dr. Paul W. Davies, a pain relief specialist who heads the Natalie M. LaPrade Medical Marijuana Commission. The panel is charged with writing the rules for the program, which limits the program to five academic medical centers.
NEWS
Dr. Martin Wasserman | March 27, 2014
Staffers passing by a room in the U.S. House of Representatives office building earlier this month did double takes. Whom they saw inside were no ordinary Capitol Hill briefing attendees: rats, mice, guinea pigs and rabbits. The presence of these animals in the halls of Congress evidences a paradigm shift that could forever change how we protect public health in America. It's one of many developments this month that signal progress toward a safer future. Congressman James Moran (D-Va.)
NEWS
March 7, 1994
News reports are so often filled with stories of medical miracles that we frequently overlook the glaring failures that stare us in the face. At long last, a federal panel has fingered one of the most scandalous -- the failure of the medical profession to pay attention to something as basic as relieving pain in cancer patients.Guidelines released by the Department of Health and Human Services are designed to steer the medical community toward better pain-relief practices, particularly by treating pain early and aggressively.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2014
The chairman of a commission set up to oversee the implementation of a medical marijuana program told lawmakers Thursday that the initiative is at least 18 months away from offering pain relief to the first patients. Even with that much time, it is by no means certain that the program will get off the ground, said Dr. Paul W. Davies, a pain relief specialist who heads the Natalie M. LaPrade Medical Marijuana Commission. The panel is charged with writing the rules for the program, which limits the program to five academic medical centers.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | May 24, 1994
What would we do without pain? You'd pick up a hot frying pan and burn yourself badly if it weren't for an almost instantaneous reflex that makes you drop it. You might walk miles on a sprained ankle doing further damage except for the body's protective signal that says stop.Pain is the body's early warning system that alerts you to anything from appendicitis to a heart attack.Despite its importance, pain can ruin people's lives. You could live with a stuffy nose or stiff joints, but pain gets your attention and can dominate every waking moment.
NEWS
By King Features Syndicate | May 14, 2000
Q. I've had severe arthritis since I was 19, more than 48 years ago. I've been treated with dozens of drugs, but they have no effect, help for only a few months or cause allergies. Just one Motrin almost killed me. One doctor suggested I try hot pepper. Now I chop peppers into a coarse relish, soak them in white vinegar for three weeks to kill the pepper taste and eat a tablespoon or two several times a week with meals. With the hot pepper, I take two regular-strength Tylenol in the morning and two at bedtime.
NEWS
By SARA ENGRAM | December 20, 1992
Jack ''Dr. Death'' Kevorkian struck again this week. Only hours after he assisted in the deaths of two more middle-aged women, Michigan Gov. John Engler signed a law that will ban assisted suicides for 15 months, beginning March 30.But don't underestimate the accomplishments of the doctor who has bedeviled Michigan authorities since the June day in 1990 when he helped an Oregon woman to kill herself in the back of his van. After all, the same law the governor...
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2013
A Baltimore County pain treatment center is resisting involvement in a probe into the deadly national fungal meningitis outbreak linked to tainted steroids last year. Baltimore Pain Management Center, which received some doses of the recalled medications, filed an objection Tuesday in federal court to a subpoena it received last month. Lawyers are seeking documents from 76 clinics across the country, including seven in Maryland, that received the drugs as they build a case against New England Compounding Pharmacy Inc., the Massachusetts facility that produced them.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2012
An estimated 3.5 million cancer patients around the globe are in severe pain from their disease, but many get no relief. In poor countries the cost is considered too high for drugs like morphine when such opioids are often stolen, abused or not taken according to instruction. But some Johns Hopkins University scientists have been working on a solution for those patients, as well as some in the United States, that uses a flexible button-sized disk implanted under the skin that releases consistent doses of painkiller over a month.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2010
Patricia Kowalczyk had been suffering with neck and shoulder pain for years when her doctor offered her a shot of Botox. The 60-year-old wasn't interested in smoothing her frown lines. But Johns Hopkins' Dr. Paul Christo wasn't offering the popular cosmetic procedure most often associated with the botulinum toxin that paralyzes nerves and muscles. He wanted to give her one small, carefully aimed dose to knock out the ache that made daily activity a chore. "Most of the public doesn't realize Botox is used for medical purposes," said Christo, an assistant professor of anesthesiology and critical care medicine in Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine's division of pain medicine.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,Sun reporter | January 2, 2008
On the morning of July 2, 2006, Sgt. Nick Paupore was driving the lead Humvee in a convoy near Kirkuk, in northern Iraq, when a roadside bomb blew off his right leg above the knee. Within 48 hours, he was at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, where he has spent the past 18 months recovering. Soon after arriving, Paupore began to feel excruciating pain - in his missing leg. "It felt like someone was shocking me, like someone was putting an electrode on the back of my ankle," says Paupore, 32. He tried several painkillers, including methadone, but the pain didn't let up. Then a Navy neurologist, Dr. Jack W. Tsao, asked him to try a new approach that requires patients to move the intact limb while watching the action in a mirror.
NEWS
By JUDY FOREMAN | February 10, 2006
A spate of recent studies demonstrating the powerful effect of placebos, or fake treatments, reinforces the idea that what we think about our medical care really can affect our health. The new research, particularly studies using the latest in brain scanning technology, is giving scientists the most detailed and direct evidence yet into how expectations - beliefs about whether a treatment will work - can have an actual, observable effect in patients' brains and on their well-being. In one study, researchers hooked 14 healthy young men up to PET scanners that monitored changes in brain function.
SPORTS
By Ed Waldman and Ed Waldman,SUN STAFF | January 3, 2005
The weekend warriors feel the pain just as the pro athletes do: the throbbing knee that makes it an adventure to get out of bed at night to go to the bathroom, the tight back that makes it impossible to bend down to tie your shoes. And now, with the recent news about possible heart-related side effects of some of the more popular drugs used to manage that pain, the two groups are voicing similar concerns. "There is some chatter in the locker room," said Bill Tessendorf, head athletic trainer of the Ravens, the person who sends the players to doctors, who can write prescriptions.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff writer | February 3, 1991
Vernon Faid still marvels that he never experienced any pain after his kidney operation last year.And he says he owes it all to the analgesia pump his doctor prescribed for pain relief."
NEWS
By JUDY FOREMAN | February 10, 2006
A spate of recent studies demonstrating the powerful effect of placebos, or fake treatments, reinforces the idea that what we think about our medical care really can affect our health. The new research, particularly studies using the latest in brain scanning technology, is giving scientists the most detailed and direct evidence yet into how expectations - beliefs about whether a treatment will work - can have an actual, observable effect in patients' brains and on their well-being. In one study, researchers hooked 14 healthy young men up to PET scanners that monitored changes in brain function.
NEWS
By Patricia Corrigan and Patricia Corrigan,Knight Ridder / Tribune | December 24, 2004
When is a foot rub more than a foot rub? When it's reflexology, an ancient form of body work gaining in popularity. Evidence supporting the value of reflexology is anecdotal, but the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health has funded a two-year study on whether reflexology can relieve pain in people with cancer. Dr. Rick Lehman, an orthopedic surgeon in St. Louis, said he is impressed with some uses of reflexology. "I do a lot of work with Olympic athletes, and they use practitioners who practice reflexology and other pressure-point therapy," he said.
NEWS
By Roni Rabin and Roni Rabin,NEWSDAY | March 10, 2004
Aiming both to curb antibiotic use and to improve care, two medical associations have endorsed a new approach to common childhood ear infections, encouraging doctors to ease pain but consider postponing antibiotic treatment for two to three days. The new treatment option could apply to many children over the age of 2 who have mild cases of acute otitis media. Up to 80 percent of middle ear infections, though bacterial, clear up without medical intervention, studies show. Parents could be sent home with instructions to return to the doctor, call in two to three days or be given a "safety net prescription," to be filled only if the child doesn't improve in two to three days, said Dr. Richard Rosenfeld, co-author of the new guidelines.
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