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Pain Medication

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NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2005
When Alice L. Bower went to the Upper Chesapeake Medical Center's emergency room last April, the 32-year-old mother of four complained of abdominal pain that the staff of the Bel Air hospital diagnosed as a benign ovarian cyst, court documents show. Five days later, Bowers died. In a lawsuit filed yesterday in Harford County Circuit Court, a lawyer for Bower's four children contends that she died after receiving an excessive dosage of a powerful pain medication. The medical malpractice suit seeks at least $2 million from Upper Chesapeake Health System Inc., the doctor who oversaw Bower's care and the medical provider that employs the physician.
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SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | December 15, 2013
Each time the ambulance hit a pothole, Dennis Pitta experienced a new level of agony. There were so many things on his mind. Was his season over? Was his career in jeopardy? How was his wife? Serious reflection, though, would have to wait. The pain was just too consuming. Pitta lay in the back of the ambulance in the fetal position, unable to straighten his legs. His body swayed as the ambulance weaved through traffic. Each bump on the way to Columbia's MedStar Union Memorial Hospital - Liberty Road was the worst - felt like another dagger being plunged into his side.
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NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | January 22, 2004
A New Windsor woman who pleaded guilty to manslaughter after selling her 27-year-old nephew a fatal patch of pain medication sometimes abused for its heroin-like effect will be released in May, six months earlier than if she completed the sentence imposed last year. Carroll County Circuit Judge Luke K. Burns Jr. deemed Regina Raye Kesselring, 48, well enough to remain in jail for four more months. "This is a tough call for me," said Burns, who will retire Friday after 25 years on the bench.
NEWS
By Grant Smith | August 27, 2012
For all the attention that violent crime gets in the media, the average American is much more likely to die from another largely preventable tragedy. Fatal drug overdoses have risen sharply in recent years. In Congress this month, Maryland Rep. Donna F. Edwards introduced bipartisan legislation known as the Stop Overdose Stat (S.O.S.) Act to help reverse this national trend. Every year, the lives of more than 28,000 Americans and more than 200 Baltimore City residents are claimed by a drug overdose.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | October 28, 1991
On Feb. 9, 1985, a Maryland housewife gave birth to a baby 3 1/2 months early. Jeffrey Lawson weighed only 1 pound, 11 1/2 ounces, and was 12 3/4 inches long. To survive, the boy needed surgery to tie off an unwanted blood vessel near his heart.It was an operation often performed on premature babies with underdeveloped cardiovascular-pulmonary systems. Several procedures were done at once.Jeffrey survived only five weeks after his surgery, which left his parents, Jill and James Lawson, devastated.
NEWS
April 6, 2011
In response to "Maryland seeks to tackle prescription drug problem" (April 2), the American Pain Foundation (APF), the nation's leading advocacy group for people affected by pain, located in Baltimore, would like to remind legislators that in addition to helping curb abuse and misuse of prescription pain medication in this state, they must be careful not to diminish access to pain care. Pain is a serious and costly public health issue, and if untreated, it can be devastating. Unmanaged pain impacts all areas of one's life including ability to perform everyday tasks, sleep and work.
NEWS
October 31, 1990
WESTMINSTER - Specially qualifying patients at Carroll County General Hospital will be able to control the amount of their pain medication themselves using a new Patient Controlled Analgesia pump device now available.Instead of requesting a pain shot from the nurse, patients whose physician recommends PCA are able to give themselves pain medication as they feel the need.Dr. Glenn Feroli, assistant director of pharmacy and clinical pharmacist, said the concept of PCA is based on the recognition that each individual "feels" pain differently; hence, the amount of analgesia necessary to help patients cope with pain varies.
SPORTS
By Ed Waldman and Ed Waldman,SUN STAFF | January 3, 2005
The weekend warriors feel the pain just as the pro athletes do: the throbbing knee that makes it an adventure to get out of bed at night to go to the bathroom, the tight back that makes it impossible to bend down to tie your shoes. And now, with the recent news about possible heart-related side effects of some of the more popular drugs used to manage that pain, the two groups are voicing similar concerns. "There is some chatter in the locker room," said Bill Tessendorf, head athletic trainer of the Ravens, the person who sends the players to doctors, who can write prescriptions.
SPORTS
By KEVIN ECK | September 5, 2006
World Wrestling Entertainment commentators Jim Ross and Jerry Lawler spoke in a somber tone that was eerily familiar to pro wrestling fans during last week's broadcast of Monday Night Raw. It was a segment devoid of the usual hyperbole and theatrics of professional wrestling, a signal to viewers that what they were seeing was not part of a story line. Too often over the years, what came next was the announcement that a pro wrestler, usually in his 30s or 40s, had died. This time, however, the news was far less grave.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff | July 20, 1999
Variations in a single gene can determine how intensely a person feels pain, whether caused by a pinprick or a dentist's drill, according to a study at Johns Hopkins Hospital and the National Institute on Drug Abuse.The study could help put to rest the long-held assumption that pain sensitivity is a matter of mental toughness. People really do experience pain differently, doctors say -- and genetics is largely responsible."Many assume the way people respond is voluntary; 'Just put up with it' has been a common recommendation for years," said Dr. George Uhl, a Hopkins neuroscientist who also heads NIDA's molecular neurobiology branch.
NEWS
April 6, 2011
In response to "Maryland seeks to tackle prescription drug problem" (April 2), the American Pain Foundation (APF), the nation's leading advocacy group for people affected by pain, located in Baltimore, would like to remind legislators that in addition to helping curb abuse and misuse of prescription pain medication in this state, they must be careful not to diminish access to pain care. Pain is a serious and costly public health issue, and if untreated, it can be devastating. Unmanaged pain impacts all areas of one's life including ability to perform everyday tasks, sleep and work.
NEWS
June 15, 2009
Pain is the No. 1 reason people seek medical help. Acute-onset pain suggests a medical emergency and immediate medical assistance is necessary. Chronic pain has a significant impact on human life. According to Dr. Zhaoming Chen, the best way to control chronic pain is a multidisciplinary approach that includes complementary and alternative medicine. Chen, chairman of the American Association of Integrative Medicine and a physician at St. Agnes Hospital, offers several easy ways to help people deal with pain.
SPORTS
By KEVIN ECK | September 5, 2006
World Wrestling Entertainment commentators Jim Ross and Jerry Lawler spoke in a somber tone that was eerily familiar to pro wrestling fans during last week's broadcast of Monday Night Raw. It was a segment devoid of the usual hyperbole and theatrics of professional wrestling, a signal to viewers that what they were seeing was not part of a story line. Too often over the years, what came next was the announcement that a pro wrestler, usually in his 30s or 40s, had died. This time, however, the news was far less grave.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | September 11, 2005
His head almost completely hidden by a virtual-reality helmet, 12-year-old Eli Modlin plunged his hand into a vat of painfully cold ice water as his mind slipped into another aquatic world. Now a diver navigating the ocean floor, Eli watched sharks and giant sea turtles slowly circle above the swaying sea grass and colorful coral reefs just ahead. The only sounds he could hear were of his own breathing. The allure of buried treasure dominated his thoughts. Only later did Eli realize what he hadn't felt for a long stretch - the pain from the icy cold water.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2005
When Alice L. Bower went to the Upper Chesapeake Medical Center's emergency room last April, the 32-year-old mother of four complained of abdominal pain that the staff of the Bel Air hospital diagnosed as a benign ovarian cyst, court documents show. Five days later, Bowers died. In a lawsuit filed yesterday in Harford County Circuit Court, a lawyer for Bower's four children contends that she died after receiving an excessive dosage of a powerful pain medication. The medical malpractice suit seeks at least $2 million from Upper Chesapeake Health System Inc., the doctor who oversaw Bower's care and the medical provider that employs the physician.
SPORTS
By Ed Waldman and Ed Waldman,SUN STAFF | January 3, 2005
The weekend warriors feel the pain just as the pro athletes do: the throbbing knee that makes it an adventure to get out of bed at night to go to the bathroom, the tight back that makes it impossible to bend down to tie your shoes. And now, with the recent news about possible heart-related side effects of some of the more popular drugs used to manage that pain, the two groups are voicing similar concerns. "There is some chatter in the locker room," said Bill Tessendorf, head athletic trainer of the Ravens, the person who sends the players to doctors, who can write prescriptions.
NEWS
June 15, 2009
Pain is the No. 1 reason people seek medical help. Acute-onset pain suggests a medical emergency and immediate medical assistance is necessary. Chronic pain has a significant impact on human life. According to Dr. Zhaoming Chen, the best way to control chronic pain is a multidisciplinary approach that includes complementary and alternative medicine. Chen, chairman of the American Association of Integrative Medicine and a physician at St. Agnes Hospital, offers several easy ways to help people deal with pain.
BUSINESS
By Margo Stack and Margo Stack,Special to Baltimoresun.com | March 1, 2004
Anxious husbands and a small army of attending medical professionals aren't the only ones joining laboring women in hospital delivery rooms in the Baltimore region. A growing number of expectant mothers are hiring female birth companions -- doulas -- to provide round-the-clock physical, emotional and informational support during labor and delivery. This has led to a ten-fold increase in their ranks statewide in the past decade. A doula, which means "woman's servant" in Greek, is different from a midwife, who is a trained medical professional who performs clinical tasks or diagnoses medical conditions.
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