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ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | August 31, 2006
The pain is still fresh, but Mary Ida Vandross has to find a way to face the music. A year after burying the last of her four children, the great song stylist Luther Vandross, the Philadelphia resident can hardly bear to hear recordings of her son's famed champagne tenor. "I'm getting a little adjusted to listening," she says. "Before, I just couldn't do it. It's one day at a time." She's promoting The Ultimate Luther Vandross, a posthumous best-of collection with two previously unreleased songs.
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NEWS
By Janene Holzberg and For The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2014
Dawn Root's life took a serendipitous turn two years ago, one that eventually brought her to talk about her mother's death as a way to fight domestic violence. The Glen Burnie resident spoke as an advocate and survivor Tuesday at the fifth annual candlelight vigil held by HopeWorks, a Howard County agency that serves victims of sexual, dating and domestic violence. The event, held in Columbia, marked October's designation as Domestic Violence Awareness Month across the country. Root told the gathering of 40 people wearing purple ribbons that she is on a mission to speak to audiences across the Baltimore area "since living in the darkness wasn't serving me, and I realized it was time to leave negativity behind.
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ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2013
Researchers at Queen's University in Belfast, Northern Ireland, are out with a new study that they say indicates that crabs feel pain. Or at least the shore crab ( Carcinus maenas ) does. The experiment, designed by Barry Magee and Robert W. Elwood, introduced crabs to a new environment that included two shelters, one benign and one that gave out mild electric shocks. When the crabs were reintroduced to the environment, they pretty much did whatever they did the first time. But the third time they went in the tank, they tended to steer clear of the shock-giving shelter.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Angel, an aging 17-year-old giraffe born and raised at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore , was euthanized Tuesday, officials said. Angel long struggled with leg and back pain, which worsened recently, Dr. Ellen Bronson, the zoo's chief veterinarian, said in a statement. "While we were able to provide her with pain medicine which made her more comfortable, we realized that her quality of life was declining and the decision was made to euthanize her," Bronson said. She is the fourth older female giraffe to die at the zoo since 2008.
NEWS
October 13, 2010
I am sure I will take some flack for this. But here goes anyhow. Our elected leaders are mostly talk and no action. Why? Because they know we as a country are short of the cash it takes to get things done. Remember it is always the money. The rest of us are just whining, and hoping somebody else will fix the problems. So here's an idea. Add a $1 tax to all the gasoline sold in this country for one year. Let the individual states collect it, keep half, and send the rest to the federal government.
HEALTH
January 4, 2010
Almost everyone will experience back pain at some point in life. In fact, back pain is one of the most common nervous-system complaints, second only to headaches. According to the National Institute of Neurologic Disease and Stroke, low back pain is one of the top causes of missed workdays, and its treatment costs about $50 billion each year. Dr. Marlís González-Fernández, assistant professor of physical medicine and rehabilitation at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the medical director of the outpatient physical medicine and rehabilitation clinics at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, has some advice for back pain prevention: •Maintaining good physical fitness is the best way to reduce the possibility of injury.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | September 22, 2011
Domonique Foxworth conceded that his surgically repaired right knee is still troubling him and preventing him from being an effective cornerback. “I don't think I'm as good as I was,” Foxworth said prior to Thursday's practice. “I think towards the end of my first year here, I was playing really well and feeling really confident, and it's frustrating to be back and not feel as good as I want to feel to make plays. To have all of these great players depending on you to step up and play the way they know you're capable of and then to not be able to do it is frustrating.
SPORTS
April 21, 2011
Twenty-two birdies. That's all Ken Green wants out of his teammate this week. "I don't think I've made 22 birdies in my last four tournaments combined," Mark Calcavecchia said Wednesday. "We'll have fun either way. " Green and Calcavecchia are paired at this week's Legends of Golf, a partnership they sometimes discussed in the days before they hit the Champions Tour — "when I was actually normal," Green said. That was before Green lost his lower right leg in a fiery 2009 RV accident.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 13, 2013
Having succumbed at long last to a winter cold, I felt I would dedicate this Midweek Madness installment to my fellow sufferers. I suggest we all sing through our pain, with the help of Betty Boop and that profound ditty "I Got a Cold in My Nose. " (Her performance makes me want to dig out "Funny Lady" again to hear Streisand's fun version.) Grab a Kleenex and chime in:
NEWS
February 14, 2013
I find it very difficult to compare children losing their playmates to parents being bound, gagged and stabbed to death by a neighbor ("A sister arrives at a different view," Feb. 10). Whether John Booth-El wielded the knife or not, he still participated in a vicious attack that resulted in the deaths of two people he knew, and he is therefore just as guilty of their murder. Peggy Alley, Baltimore
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
The arrival of veteran wide receiver Steve Smith didn't suddenly transform wide receiver Torrey Smith into the forgotten man in the Ravens' offense. That's been the net effect, though, for the former Maryland standout as Torrey Smith and quarterback Joe Flacco have struggled to connect on deep passes. Meanwhile, Steve Smith has thrived in offensive coordinator Gary Kubiak's system. Torrey Smith has been targeted 19 times and has caught just six passes for 85 yards while Steve Smith has been thrown to 31 times and has 18 catches, 290 yards and a touchdown.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | September 21, 2014
My mother was a child abuser. I was, too. In fact, growing up, pretty much every parent I knew abused their kids. Or so many of Adrian Peterson's critics would have you believe. Mr. Peterson, a star of the Minnesota Vikings, was arrested recently for child abuse after hitting his 4-year-old son with a switch. A "switch," for those who don't know, is a long twig. I should know, having been on the receiving end of quite a few. When no switch was available, mom was also known to employ a section of the orange plastic track from my Hot Wheels.
HEALTH
Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
A database in Kentucky that has tracked potentially dangerous and addictive prescriptions dispensed in the state for the past 15 years has become a national model by helping significantly reduce so-called doctor-shopping for pain drugs. Federal data show the state has dropped from the second-highest abuser of prescription drugs such as OxyContin and Percocet to 31st. But what it and other states cannot show is that such programs cut down on overdose deaths from all legal and illegal drugs, a lesson not lost on Maryland as its joins every other state in launching its own prescription drug monitoring system.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2014
One day after a stunning 31-27 loss to Central Connecticut State on Saturday night in the season opener for both teams, the Towson football team met in what coach Rob Ambrose described as a “somber” mood. Taking it a step further, Ambrose compared the team's reaction to the sudden shock of a bucket of ice water. “The bucket of water got dumped on their head, and they didn't like it too much,” Ambrose said Monday afternoon during his weekly conference call organized by the Colonial Athletic Association.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
Erin Sharp arrived at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport a little less than two hours before her 9:40 a.m. flight to San Diego on Sunday, timed so that her 11-month-old son would zonk out on the plane and they would arrive home with the afternoon to spare. Instead, Sharp wouldn't leave the Anne Arundel County airport for another nine hours, she said, after an enormous ticketing line for Southwest Airlines caused her and other passengers to miss their flights and the airline couldn't immediately get her onto another.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
Charlotte Rollenhagen still remembers the first time she saw Dorothy Hutchins at Johns Hopkins Hospital. It was 1940, and the 10-year-old girl had been badly burned when her dress caught fire on the kitchen stove in her family's Highlandtown home. Her entire back was burned, as well as part of her left leg and her left arm, which she flapped in vain to put the flames out. "The picture of this little girl is indelibly placed in my mind," said Rollenhagen, who at the time was a rookie 21-year-old nurse.
NEWS
October 3, 2013
Dan Shannahan's recent letter to the editor was sad ( "Mikulski picks the wrong side on Obamacare," Sept. 30). I'm sorry he has apparently suffered in the private sector, but his Schadenfreude at the hardships federal workers might be experiencing is just pathetic. The jealousy and resentment seething from his letter aren't really that surprising, of course, given that they are fostered by talk radio and the tea party, a standard tactic of demagogues who want people to blame others for their situation.
NEWS
July 25, 2013
Maryland Sen. Ben Cardin makes a good point about how the sequester may be harming many worthwhile programs and government employees ("Sequestration hurts," July 22). But the senator ignores the outrageous waste of money still perpetuated by our government and its leaders. What part of the more than $100 million we spent on the president's recent trip to Africa went for the protection and costs for his family, including his mother in law? Granted, they reimburse commercial plane fares, but that is a drop in the bucket of the total cost.
SPORTS
Mike Preston | July 31, 2014
Ravens running back Ray Rice apologized to his wife Thursday. That's one thing he had to do before most of us could respect him again and allow him to move on with his life. Now, let the healing process begin. We may not forget, but forgiving becomes a lot easier when the words "I'm sorry" are mentioned. "Last time I didn't publicly apologize to my wife, and I realized that hit home with a lot of people," Rice said. "There's many nights that me and my wife sleep together and we still have to deal with this.
BUSINESS
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2014
When Gene Shirokobrod's patients started asking the doctor of physical therapy to come home with them, he decided to find a product to recommend as an alternative for help with back and neck pain. But he couldn't find any product he thought was good enough to recommend, so he set out to make something. Shirokobrod reached out to Corey Fleischer, a mechanical engineer and co-founder of the Baltimore Foundery, to help him create the ARC, a product to relieve back and neck pain and retrain muscle.
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