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By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Evening Sun Staff | May 6, 1991
DORIS AND Benjamin Terry met 50 years ago on Palm Sunday in the shadow of the Patterson Park Observatory. There, Doris would come with her girlfriends, and Benjamin would come from Edgewood with his soldier buddies. "We just got together and talked," Doris Terry, 68, remembers. "And there was no monkey business."But it was not until Benjamin returned from the war and the couple got married that they both ascended the spiral staircase to the top of the 60-foot, octagonal tower to survey their Baltimore universe -- the Washington Monument and the growing city to the west, the busy harbor, and their own working-class neighborhood, a lively melting pot of people who had made their way to the New World from Europe.
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HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2014
Now that signs of the history of Hampstead Hill have been unearthed, historians hope to keep its 200-year-old stories from being forgotten again soon. Advocates for Patterson Park and Baltimore's legacy of the War of 1812 plan new signs and displays for artifacts uncovered in an archaeological dig completed this month, including a musket ball and gunflint dating to 1814 and a belt buckle from the Civil War. They also plan to seek inclusion on the National Register of Historic Places.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | April 28, 2002
Mary Sloan Roby stood before the deteriorating hulk that dominated her East Baltimore neighborhood 10 years ago and promised a small group of volunteers that the Patterson Park Pagoda would reopen in all its original grandeur within a year. The president of the Friends of Patterson Park was a bit off on time. It would take a decade of planning and $500,000 to relieve the 60-foot tower of its shattered windows, rotting wood, peeling paint, rusting ironwork and infestation of pigeons. Before a crowd of several thousand yesterday, Roby officially reopened the pagoda.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2014
Today it's best known for the pagoda, summertime jazz concerts and some of the city's best sledding. But an archaeological dig planned for Patterson Park's Hampstead Hill seeks to revive a largely forgotten 200-year-old story. While most know Fort McHenry's role in the Battle of Baltimore, thanks to Francis Scott Key and "The Star-Spangled Banner," few know or remember what transpired on the hill overlooking the harbor. Buried there could lie remnants of the trenches that helped Baltimore fend off advancing British land forces and end the War of 1812.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2002
A solitary saxophone player walks through Southeast Baltimore's Patterson Park, enters the park's pagoda and climbs the steps of the 1891 structure. The musician, 74-year-old Marion Grden, plays Summertime, then Sailing Down the Chesapeake Bay as he ascends the pagoda's time-worn iron steps. Then, looking toward Canton, he lets loose with Harbor Lights. The recent event was a beautiful thing, a prelude to this Saturday's serenade of park visitors by 100 massed saxophonists - including Grden.
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin and Bonnie J. Schupp and David Michael Ettlin and Bonnie J. Schupp,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 26, 1998
The Hunan Pagoda was like a long lost friend: It was a little hard to find, and then did not quite live up to our memories and expectations.Since our last culinary meeting, Route 100 has sliced through the neighborhood, diverting traffic (and potential customers) from the stretch of Dorsey Road in Hanover the restaurant occupies.And the little restaurant has gotten smaller -- giving up a section of a dining room that rarely seemed crowded to its next-door neighbor in the shopping strip, an Italian eatery.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2014
Today it's best known for the pagoda, summertime jazz concerts and some of the city's best sledding. But an archaeological dig planned for Patterson Park's Hampstead Hill seeks to revive a largely forgotten 200-year-old story. While most know Fort McHenry's role in the Battle of Baltimore, thanks to Francis Scott Key and "The Star-Spangled Banner," few know or remember what transpired on the hill overlooking the harbor. Buried there could lie remnants of the trenches that helped Baltimore fend off advancing British land forces and end the War of 1812.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | December 28, 2001
Significant but delicate renovation work on Patterson Park's historic pagoda should soon be finished, opening one of the city's oldest and grandest observation towers to climbing for the first time in 10 years. "The pagoda is the symbol for Paterson Park, it has a sentimental appeal," said Nancy Supik, president of Friends of Patterson Park. "It is the focal point of the park and has a tremendous view of the Baltimore Harbor and downtown." The narrow, four-story pagoda was a place where men proposed marriage and where couples shared a first kiss, she said.
NEWS
By Photos by Algerina Perna and Photos by Algerina Perna,Sun photographer | November 20, 2006
The renovated pagoda in Patterson Park, once a symbol of the area's decline, is now a bright sign of turnaround. Once a month, volunteers clean up the community landmark and beautify the area around it. The Victorian gem provides a luxurious view of the harbor.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | January 1, 2000
One of Baltimore's landmarks -- the 60-foot octagonal observation tower in Patterson Park called the Pagoda -- is expected to undergo a $400,000 renovation this year and reopen to the public. "It's a landmark for people of Southeast" Baltimore, said Nancy Supik, community organizer for Friends of Patterson Park. "It's going to be a very important improvement." The renovation of the Pagoda, which dates to 1891, is part of a master plan for Patterson Park that the city will continue developing over the next two years, said Chad Spangler, a planner with the city's parks department.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2012
When the Su family chose a burial plot two years ago, it had all the traditional elements valued in their native Taiwan. The site, protected by a hill, faced the sun in the south and overlooked a scenic lake at Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens in Timonium. Family members, who visit the site weekly, are delighted that there are so many more of the Asian designs and symbols that for centuries have honored the dead and comforted the living. The Sus now walk through a polished granite pagoda to the cemetery's Garden of Tranquility, which will be formally dedicated Wednesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2012
The Friends of Patterson Park are holding their 8th annual Wine Tasting at Sunset event on Thursday night around the historic Marble Fountain and Pagoda. Wine tastings and food samplings are coming from Chesapeake Wine Co. , DiPasquale's , Bistro Rx , V-No and  Todd Conner's . The evening includes an acoustic performance by Rob Fahey and silent and live auctions. Tickets are $50 and can be purchased on the Friends website or by calling the Friends office at 410-276-3676.
NEWS
By Photos by Algerina Perna and Photos by Algerina Perna,Sun photographer | November 20, 2006
The renovated pagoda in Patterson Park, once a symbol of the area's decline, is now a bright sign of turnaround. Once a month, volunteers clean up the community landmark and beautify the area around it. The Victorian gem provides a luxurious view of the harbor.
ENTERTAINMENT
By LORI SEARS | August 24, 2006
A DAY AT HARBOR EAST For an afternoon filled with music and art, visit the Harbor East Fine Arts and Music Festival Saturday. The free outdoor festival showcases local and regional musical talent, including the Duhks, the Pale Stars, Judd and Maggie, and Rob Thorworth, as well as artists displaying and selling their works. Festival-goers can also watch street performers, visit the kids' arts and crafts area featuring activities from the Baltimore Museum of Art and Port Discovery, purchase food and more.
TRAVEL
By ROBIN HOLLOWAY | April 9, 2006
My sister, daughter and I toured Japan last summer and were captivated by Kinkajuji, or the Golden Pavilion in Kyoto. One of Japan's architectural masterpieces, the pagoda was started in 1397 when Ashikaga Yoshimitsu abdicated in favor of his son and began to build this villa as a retreat. By 1407 it was a large complex and village with numerous pagodas and temples. Upon his death a year later, the Golden Pavilion became a Zen temple. The temple was destroyed during a civil war in 1467, rebuilt, and destroyed again in 1567.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | April 26, 2004
Amid drum rolls, waving streamers and cheers, Patterson Park's 19th-century fountain bubbled back to life yesterday after decades of sitting silent on the hill at Lombard Street. Nearly 500 people came to the park to see the latest project to be completed in the city's $3 million master plan for Patterson Park. In the past two years, the 60-foot-tall pagoda and the boat lake were restored and reopened as part of the plan adopted in 1998. "This fountain was [created] as a community gathering place - a place for people to show off their hats and hang out. That's what we want to have happen again," said Kini Collins of Friends of Patterson Park, the nonprofit group that has brought together city and foundation funds to lead the park's renaissance.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach | November 16, 2003
As part of Maryland Through the Artist's Eye, an exhibit that presents history through a variety of artworks, the Maryland Historical Society's deputy director, Nancy Davis, asked photographers Joseph Hyde and Christopher Hartlove to use their cameras to re-create vintage landscape paintings. To do so, the photographers visited the same spots and viewed the scenes from the same perspectives as the painters did - then captured on film what they saw. The resulting pictures provide museum visitors with a snapshot of how these Maryland views have changed, a century or two after being committed to canvas.
NEWS
August 9, 1996
A gunman robbed the Pagoda House Restaurant in Odenton of an undisclosed amount of money Wednesday, county police said.Police said the man walked into the restaurant in the 1600 block of Annapolis Road shortly after 9 p.m. and the owner asked if she could help him. The man pulled up his shirt, showed the woman a gun and demanded money.The woman gave the man cash from the register, and he ran east on Annapolis Road, police said.The robber was described as black, between 5 feet 6 inches and 5 feet 7 inches tall with a heavy build, close-cut hair and clean shaven.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach | November 16, 2003
As part of Maryland Through the Artist's Eye, an exhibit that presents history through a variety of artworks, the Maryland Historical Society's deputy director, Nancy Davis, asked photographers Joseph Hyde and Christopher Hartlove to use their cameras to re-create vintage landscape paintings. To do so, the photographers visited the same spots and viewed the scenes from the same perspectives as the painters did - then captured on film what they saw. The resulting pictures provide museum visitors with a snapshot of how these Maryland views have changed, a century or two after being committed to canvas.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 7, 2003
Thomas D. Bolita, the friendly face at the top of the Patterson Park Pagoda who never tired of explaining to visitors its history and that of the surrounding neighborhood, died of heart failure Thursday at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Butchers Hill resident was 72. Mr. Bolita, who was born and raised in Brooklyn, N.Y., served in the Army during the Korean War and later attended George Washington University. The former Beltsville and Columbia resident worked for 38 years as a National Security Agency analyst at Fort Meade and retired in 1991.
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