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NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,sun reporter | June 26, 2007
When JCPenney purchased the old Woodward & Lothrop store in Columbia, it wanted to add shelves and displays to showcase the new wares to shoppers as they glided between floors. But the death of a store clerk who could not breathe after her head became wedged between the escalator's moving handrail and the new display, has her family convinced that the designers were negligent. Andrea Albright, a 24-year-old single mother, was riding the up escalator at the Penney store in The Mall in Columbia on June 15, 2002.
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NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Frank D. Roylance and Laura Smitherman and Frank D. Roylance,laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | September 16, 2009
The voices that ring out across Baltimore's airport terminals, paging lost travelers and steering foreigners to a meeting spot, will be a service of the past starting next month. And if you want to get a live person on the line when calling the airport's toll-free number for general inquiries, forget about it. The Maryland Aviation Administration is closing the communications center at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport, a move prompted by state budget woes that will save $450,000 a year.
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BUSINESS
November 9, 1992
A small California start-up company, EO Inc., has unveiled the first "personal communicator," a hand-held device that combines the capabilities of a pager, phone, fax, computer and electronic organizer.The device, to be available in the second quarter of next year, will be priced from $1,999 to $3,299, depending on options.In addition to AT&T, EO is backed by two Japanese companies, Matsushita Electric Industrial Corp., which makes Panasonic products, and Marubeni Corp., a Japanese trading company.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | September 12, 2007
The sheriff was back in town, and his posse turned out to meet him. C. Miles sat at a table in the rear of the dining room at Duffy's Restaurant last Friday night, under a huge, rectangular banner that had his picture on it. "Welcome Back, We Miss You" the sign read. Just above the word "welcome' were words in smaller letters that were part of Miles' trademark slogans when he hosted a popular and controversial talk show on WOLB radio. "Black By Popular Demand" read one sentence, followed by "Banned By An All White Jury.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff Writer | July 3, 1993
Four people were arrested Thursday night, including an alleged drug supplier who had come back to pick up his pager when Anne Arundel County police raided a Glen Burnie home.Police said the home, in the 100 block of Fifth Ave. S.W., was filled with the smell of phencyclidine hydrochloride (PCP) at the time of the 11:30 p.m. raid. Authorities found one-half ounce of liquid PCP and a cigarette dipped in liquid PCP.Two residents of the apartment, Stephen Teal, 28, and Melissa Teal, 28, told police a man named "Stanley" had just delivered drugs there.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | April 18, 2002
Scott Vollmar pages his friends to tell them he'll be late for an appointment because he has errands to run. Elaine Kam uses her pager to check e-mail from her boss before she goes to work. And Marlon Monroyo leaves his pager on at night so that his girlfriend in Austria can offer up a sweet "Guten Morgen" first thing in the morning by instant message. The three college seniors can't use cell phones for these normal communication chores because they're deaf or hard of hearing. Last fall, technology from America Online brought them a little closer to the on-the-go convenience of cell phones by offering them a free pager that has access to both AOL e-mail and the company's Instant Messenger service, known as AIM. They were part of a pilot project from November to April at Washington's Gallaudet University, the nation's only university for deaf and hard-of-hearing students - where pagers have become the rage on campus.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1999
As a busy executive running her own television and film production company, Joelle Norwood rarely has the time for chatting at length with an investment broker about her portfolio and the stock market.But three times a day she's alerted to the trading price of three stocks she likes via a powerful two-way pager device. If she desires, Norwood can execute buy or sell orders through the device, which features a small screen and keyboard. Her brokerage, Peremel & Co. in Pikesville, began offering the Bell South devices, RIM Interactive Pagers, to customers in August.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 28, 1997
LOS ANGELES -- It's a secret language among friends.It may look like a jumble of numbers and asterisks, but it's actually a growing lexicon of the mundane, offbeat and obscene.Although the language doesn't have a name, young people across the nation rely on it to communicate those little messages that don't warrant a long conversation: "good night," "you're on my mind" or something decidedly less friendly.By dialing numbers that look vaguely like digital letters -- right-side up or upside down -- the young linguists put together words and phrases.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | August 27, 1999
Warning: If you need to reach Bill Reightler after 5 p.m. today, don't use his voice mail service. It'll be dead.The West Friendship resident is among the estimated 80,000 to 100,000 people nationwide who were taken aback to learn during the past two days that the instant voice messaging service they subscribed to, Pocketalk, would go silent today at 5 p.m.For many loyal customers like Reightler, a thoroughbred horse trainer, the service and the nifty hand-size...
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | January 14, 1996
A 25-year-old Laurel woman was raped and robbed Thursday by a man who barged into her apartment, county police said.The woman, who lives in the Horizon Square complex in the 3400 block of Fort Meade Road, told police a man knocked on her door about 7 p.m. and asked for a person she did not know.When the woman opened the door, the man forced his way inside and demanded money. She gave him $1, then he raped her.The woman called police after he left the apartment.Teen robs another youth of his pager ThursdayA 13-year-old Glen Burnie youth was robbed of his pager while he was walking along Nolpark Court Thursday afternoon, county police reported.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,sun reporter | June 26, 2007
When JCPenney purchased the old Woodward & Lothrop store in Columbia, it wanted to add shelves and displays to showcase the new wares to shoppers as they glided between floors. But the death of a store clerk who could not breathe after her head became wedged between the escalator's moving handrail and the new display, has her family convinced that the designers were negligent. Andrea Albright, a 24-year-old single mother, was riding the up escalator at the Penney store in The Mall in Columbia on June 15, 2002.
BUSINESS
By THE DALLAS MORNING NEWS | October 14, 2005
Restaurant coaster pagers - those clunky hunks of plastic that flash, vibrate and/or beep when your table is ready - are getting some new bells and whistles. After changing the technology little since the mid-1990s, makers are now hawking souped-up models that can do everything from tell time to play electronic games. And some firms are trying to expand their use beyond restaurant lobbies to stores, health care facilities and other places where patrons cool their heels. "For years ... the only thing there was in the industry was a coaster pager with lights," said Lisa Roberts, chief financial officer of North Carolina-based EPD Inc., which this year began selling a pager called the InfoCube with games, famous quotes and other information.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | June 10, 2002
A combined 45 years in corporate training has taught Charles A. Shields and Lynsie Hall an important lesson: Leadership seminars are great for learning, but practice is more likely to result in change. So the two experts in corporate training have developed OmniCoach, an e-learning system they hope will help people practice what they've learned, and take the two partners from the basement of a West Friendship home to the boardrooms of prominent companies. But their task will be difficult.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | April 18, 2002
Scott Vollmar pages his friends to tell them he'll be late for an appointment because he has errands to run. Elaine Kam uses her pager to check e-mail from her boss before she goes to work. And Marlon Monroyo leaves his pager on at night so that his girlfriend in Austria can offer up a sweet "Guten Morgen" first thing in the morning by instant message. The three college seniors can't use cell phones for these normal communication chores because they're deaf or hard of hearing. Last fall, technology from America Online brought them a little closer to the on-the-go convenience of cell phones by offering them a free pager that has access to both AOL e-mail and the company's Instant Messenger service, known as AIM. They were part of a pilot project from November to April at Washington's Gallaudet University, the nation's only university for deaf and hard-of-hearing students - where pagers have become the rage on campus.
SPORTS
By KEN MURRAY and KEN MURRAY,SUN STAFF | December 23, 2001
The NFL can tweak instant replay all it wants. It can throw red flags or beep replay buzzers. It can put the onus for review on officials or throw it back in the coaches' laps. But the league can never remove all the warts from a system that has too many variables. It can never make that system perfect. That much is obvious. The question is, can it prevent major debacles like the one that unfolded in Cleveland last Sunday, when a series of mistakes unleashed a torrent of fan abuse on players and officials alike?
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2001
Twelve years ago, the General Assembly banned students from carrying pagers onto school grounds, believing the devices were primarily tools for drug dealers. Yesterday, the House of Delegates decided times have changed. The House voted 110-26 to lift the ban -- which in practice has been construed to cover cell phones and pocket-size computers as well -- on grounds that such equipment is now widely used for legitimate purposes. The bill now goes to the state Senate. Sponsors said repealing the 1989 law will ensure that parents can reach their kids during school hours, and that students won't be restricted from using Palm Pilots or laptop computers in class.
NEWS
May 2, 1994
Woman reports theft of pager, mobile phoneA man stole a mobile phone and a pager from the athletic bag of a woman who was watching her boyfriend play softball in Oak Hill Park on Thursday evening, county police said.The man snatched the items about 7 p.m. while the woman's back was turned and then fled into nearby woods, police said.The phone was valued at $100, police said. An estimated value of the pager was not given.Woman, 41, assaulted, robbed near liquor storeAn Arnold woman was treated Thursday night at the Anne Arundel Medical Center after she was punched in the face and robbed of $20 as she tried to use a pay phone outside a liquor store, county police said.
NEWS
September 17, 1992
Mercedes thief eludes police in pursuitA man who stole a Mercedes from downtown Annapolis led police on a brief chase through the Clay Street neighborhood Tuesday afternoon before escaping into woods, city police said.A police officer was responding to a disturbance call on Clay Street shortly after noon when the driver of the Mercedes noticed the flashing lights and took off, police said. The officer chased him across Glenwood Street to the Adams Park Learning Center, where he escaped into the woods.
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | September 4, 2000
Mixing work with pleasure: It's not just for workaholics anymore. Take Michael Reardon. He looks like your average vacationer, strolling with his wife, Paula, and son, Dutch, down the boardwalk at Rehoboth Beach in Delaware. But wait. What's that black thing stuck to the waist of Michael's Bermuda shorts? It looks as if it could go off at any second. "My wife used to get upset, but I think she understands now," explains Reardon, a purchasing manager with a Philadelphia chemical company.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Roy Furchgott and Roy Furchgott,New York Times News Service | May 8, 2000
On their February ski vacation to Crested Butte in Colorado, Madeline Bayard and Wendy Black woke one morning to whiteout conditions and a tough decision: Should they waste valuable vacation time waiting for the weather to improve or brave the storm? Emboldened by a pair of $90 palm-size two-way radios that would let them find each other if separated, or even call for help, they decided to strap on their skis. Indeed, later that day the two became separated, and Bayard was uneasy. "It was like skiing in a pillowcase," she said.
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