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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | March 26, 2009
Gwinn F. Owens, a retired editor and editorial writer who made The Evening Sun's op-ed page a popular feature with readers and contributors, died of complications from dementia Sunday at College Manor nursing home in Lutherville. The longtime Ruxton resident was 87. Mr. Owens was born in Seven Oaks, England, the son of James Hamilton Owens, a veteran newspaperman, and Olga Owens, a homemaker and musician. They moved to Lutherville and later Riderwood, where he grew up, when his father was named editor of The Evening Sun in 1922.
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NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Sheridan Lyons and Sun researcher Paul McCardell contributed to this article | April 7, 1997
Bradford McElderry Jacobs, retired Evening Sun editorial page editor whose front-page endorsement helped catapult Harry R. Hughes from obscurity to the governorship in 1978, died Saturday afternoon of complications from lung surgery at Johns Hopkins Hospital.The Stevenson resident was 76.In his distinguished 44-year career as a journalist, editor and author, there was perhaps no more thrilling moment or greater achievement than securing for Mr. Hughes the Democratic nomination for governor.
NEWS
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | September 29, 1996
Today, 40 years after his death, 48 years after a stroke stilled his voice and pen forever, 116 years after his birth, Henry Louis Mencken endures as the most quoted of all American writers. I can't imagine anything that could donate more joy to his afterlife than the fact that he continues to enrage at least as many people as he pleases.Since he ridiculed the very idea of afterlife, there would be a doubling of pleasure in this. (Henry, if you're up - or down - there, please call the office.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | December 23, 1991
Although some people disagree, I feel the holiday season is a good time in which to look for a job, because:* Many companies streamline operations at year's end, replacing inefficient people with good ones.* Competition is low; few other people will look during holidays.* Many bosses are free to see you; all executives don't party, travel, goof off, etc.* Many bosses will admire your conscientiousness.JOB HINTS: Don't send out a flock of resumes; try hard for personal interviews; look in your neighborhood first; tell friends and neighbors you're looking; talk only to people who have power to hire you; before interviews, learn all about the company.
NEWS
January 2, 1998
Opinion pages and the people who create them too often are a mystery to a daily newspaper's readers. For that reason, The Sun today is running brief biographical sketches of the editors, writers and support staff behind the editorial and op-ed pages.These are the people who help craft the newspaper's institutional opinions that appear each day in the editorial columns; who verify and edit the letters from readers; who work with contributors to the Opinion * Commentary page, which is designed to allow a variety of voices on local, state, national and international issues to be heard; who talk to readers with questions or comments; and who schedule the meetings with members of the public that are a regular part of the editorial page staff's week.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | December 8, 2002
I first met Robert Maxwell in 1990 in London, where I was working as executive editor of the Sunday Correspondent, a smart startup national weekly paper that was gunned down in the crossfire of an advertising recession and ferocious competition. There was talk of his investing in it, but his well-established notoriety as a sleazy financial operator and an arrogant tyrant blocked that. I next met him in New York, when at the end of a brutal, violent strike, the Daily News -- of which I was editorial page editor -- collapsed financially and was sold, for essentially nothing, to Maxwell.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 15, 2002
Gerald E. Griffin, whose distinguished 40-year career with The Sun included stints as chief of the newspaper's Washington bureau and editorial page editor, died of heart failure yesterday at the home of a daughter in Silver Spring. He was 94. Born in Lincoln, Neb., and raised on a farm in nearby Greenwood, Mr. Griffin had his first newspaper writing experience as an eighth-grader in a one-room school when his teacher sent his essay on a poem to the local weekly. "Even at that age, I knew the piece was pretty bad," he wrote in a biographical sketch for The Sun library at his 1972 retirement.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | January 8, 2002
Dianne Donovan, senior editor for staff recruitment and editorial columnist at the Chicago Tribune, was named yesterday as editor of The Sun's editorial page. Winner of the American Society of Newspaper Editors' Distinguished Writing Award for editorial writing in 2000, Donovan succeeds Jacqueline Thomas, who resigned last month to pursue other interests. Donovan will start her new position Jan. 21. Donovan, 53, will be assisted by Jean Thompson, a 14-year veteran of The Sun who was named to the position of co-associate editor yesterday.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,Sun reporter | September 4, 2007
Anthony Day, an editorial page editor for the Los Angeles Times and son of Pulitzer Prize-winning Sun journalist Price Day, died of complications from emphysema Sunday in Santa Fe, N.M. He was 74. Born in Miami and raised in Baltimore County, Mr. Day was the eldest of four sons, all of whom followed in their father's footsteps to pursue careers in journalism. Mr. Day's route through newspapers took him from Philadelphia to Washington, where he covered politics during the turbulent administration of President Richard M. Nixon.
NEWS
By Barry Rascovar | October 22, 1995
WHERE WAS Kurt Schmoke? When a state panel heard testimony on casino gambling for the Inner Harbor last week, Baltimore's mayor missed the meeting.Barry Rascovar is deputy editorial-page editor of The Sun.
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