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By J. D. Considine | January 12, 1995
Almost 15 years after Led Zeppelin called it quits, guitarist Jimmy Page and Robert Plant have announced dates for their first tour as a duo.The tour is scheduled to begin on Feb. 26 in Pensacola, Fla., and includes a March 22 performance at the USAir Arena in Landover. There was no word at press time on when tickets will go on sale.Despite the duo's association with Led Zeppelin, this will not be a reunion tour. As Page said in a press statement, "We were both agreed that if we were going to do something then it had to be new. . . . If we were to look at old material, then we'd have to treat it as an old picture ready for a new frame."
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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,sun pop music critic | April 19, 1998
Robert Plant has never been the sort given to worrying about radio play. He certainly didn't give the matter thought when he was in Led Zeppelin.After all, Zep often didn't even bother releasing singles, but tracks like "Kashmir" and "Stairway to Heaven" still got on the air.But Plant does hope that "Walking Into Clarksdale" (Atlantic 83092, arriving in stores Tuesday), his new album with guitarist Jimmy Page, gets a fair hearing on radio. Because "Walking Into Clarksdale" is the first full album of new material these two have recorded since Led Zeppelin - which ruled the rock world for 11 years and 10 albums - broke up some 19 years ago."
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By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | March 24, 1995
Although they're meant to evoke the glories of the past, reunion tours more often end up reminding us of just how much time has passed since the breakup, and how much further popular music has moved along. At best, they offer a certain nostalgic kick, but has any reunion ever rekindled the original flame?Sure. In fact, that's precisely what Jimmy Page and Robert Plant did during the two-night stand at the USAir Arena that ended last night.Even though the tour isn't billed as the re-launch of Led Zeppelin -- and, in fact, does not include original Zep bassist John Paul Jones -- that's what most fans came expecting.
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By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | March 24, 1995
Although they're meant to evoke the glories of the past, reunion tours more often end up reminding us of just how much time has passed since the breakup, and how much further popular music has moved along. At best, they offer a certain nostalgic kick, but has any reunion ever rekindled the original flame?Sure. In fact, that's precisely what Jimmy Page and Robert Plant did during the two-night stand at the USAir Arena that ended last night.Even though the tour isn't billed as the re-launch of Led Zeppelin -- and, in fact, does not include original Zep bassist John Paul Jones -- that's what most fans came expecting.
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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | March 19, 1995
TC New York -- Jimmy Page and Robert Plant do like to talk.Given their historic reticence around the press -- an understandably tight-lipped response to all the years in which Led Zeppelin had to endure both sneering reviews and sensationalist profiles -- this is not their most celebrated trait. But here they are, hunkered down in a posh suite at the Essex House on a cool, October afternoon, nattering away about everything and anything -- including the fact that they're really too tired to be doing all this talking.
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By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | November 8, 1994
I miss the way nostalgia used to be.When I was a kid, nostalgia was strictly the province of older people. In those days, the only people who got excited about re-union albums were folks who were fans the first time around. Younger listeners were too busy with new music to care which rock relics were back.That doesn't seem the case anymore. Why else would MTV -- an operation that's as much a product of the '80s as its audience -- have shepherded the comeback of two '70s super groups, Led Zeppelin and the Eagles?
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By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | October 12, 1994
Let's get something straight right from the start: "Jimmy Page/Robert Plant (Unledded)" is not a Led Zeppelin reunion.It's better.Recorded live on location in London, Wales and Morocco, the 90-minute special (which will air this evening at 10 on MTV) doesn't so much reiterate the Led Zep legacy as reinvent it. True, nine of the 12 tunes performed have titles most Zep fans will easily recognize, but the arrangements are often radically -- and delightfully -- different.Take "The Battle of Evermore."
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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,sun pop music critic | April 19, 1998
Robert Plant has never been the sort given to worrying about radio play. He certainly didn't give the matter thought when he was in Led Zeppelin.After all, Zep often didn't even bother releasing singles, but tracks like "Kashmir" and "Stairway to Heaven" still got on the air.But Plant does hope that "Walking Into Clarksdale" (Atlantic 83092, arriving in stores Tuesday), his new album with guitarist Jimmy Page, gets a fair hearing on radio. Because "Walking Into Clarksdale" is the first full album of new material these two have recorded since Led Zeppelin - which ruled the rock world for 11 years and 10 albums - broke up some 19 years ago."
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By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | November 11, 1994
Thanks to the MTV "UnLedded" special, Jimmy Page and Robert Plant have gotten a lot of attention lately for combining Celtic and Arabic elements within what would otherwise be considered a rock-based sound. But they aren't the only pop musicians playing around with those particular ingredients. Loreena McKennitt's album, "The Mask and Mirror," draws from many of the same elements -- and beat Page and Plant to the punch by several months.Coincidence? Synchronicity? A trend?"It doesn't surprise me as a musician that we're working in similar territories," answers McKennitt, over the phone from a promotion stop in Los Angeles.
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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | December 25, 1994
It's not often that popular music promises as much and delivers as little as it did in 1994.What in May looked to be a record-breaking year for concert tours wound up with some of the biggest names in rock -- including the rejuvenated Rolling Stones and the reunited Eagles -- playing to empty seats by September. Pearl Jam put itself on the sidelines with a well-meaning but so far ineffective fight against TicketMaster, while Woodstock, despite all the mud and hype, was not only a musical anticlimax but didn't even make as much money as expected.
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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | March 19, 1995
TC New York -- Jimmy Page and Robert Plant do like to talk.Given their historic reticence around the press -- an understandably tight-lipped response to all the years in which Led Zeppelin had to endure both sneering reviews and sensationalist profiles -- this is not their most celebrated trait. But here they are, hunkered down in a posh suite at the Essex House on a cool, October afternoon, nattering away about everything and anything -- including the fact that they're really too tired to be doing all this talking.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine | January 12, 1995
Almost 15 years after Led Zeppelin called it quits, guitarist Jimmy Page and Robert Plant have announced dates for their first tour as a duo.The tour is scheduled to begin on Feb. 26 in Pensacola, Fla., and includes a March 22 performance at the USAir Arena in Landover. There was no word at press time on when tickets will go on sale.Despite the duo's association with Led Zeppelin, this will not be a reunion tour. As Page said in a press statement, "We were both agreed that if we were going to do something then it had to be new. . . . If we were to look at old material, then we'd have to treat it as an old picture ready for a new frame."
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | November 8, 1994
I miss the way nostalgia used to be.When I was a kid, nostalgia was strictly the province of older people. In those days, the only people who got excited about re-union albums were folks who were fans the first time around. Younger listeners were too busy with new music to care which rock relics were back.That doesn't seem the case anymore. Why else would MTV -- an operation that's as much a product of the '80s as its audience -- have shepherded the comeback of two '70s super groups, Led Zeppelin and the Eagles?
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | October 12, 1994
Let's get something straight right from the start: "Jimmy Page/Robert Plant (Unledded)" is not a Led Zeppelin reunion.It's better.Recorded live on location in London, Wales and Morocco, the 90-minute special (which will air this evening at 10 on MTV) doesn't so much reiterate the Led Zep legacy as reinvent it. True, nine of the 12 tunes performed have titles most Zep fans will easily recognize, but the arrangements are often radically -- and delightfully -- different.Take "The Battle of Evermore."
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | September 18, 1994
Fall ought to be a great season for pop music stay-at-homes -- provided they didn't blow all their money on summertime concerts.After what appears to have been the highest-grossing summer in music business history, the concert market is almost tapped out. It isn't just that sky-high ticket prices have left fans with lessmoney to spend on concerts. There just aren't many tours left to spend money on once Pink Floyd, Aerosmith, the Rolling Stones and the Eagles have passed through.In fact, apart from Eric Clapton (whose blues revue is due at the USAir Arena Oct. 12)
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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | October 12, 1994
If you made the mistake of watching Fox's "Roseanne: An Unauthorized Biography" last night, you've got two chances to watch the real Roseanne tonight and get the taste of Denny Dillon's hideously bad portrayal out of your mouth. There's also an unofficial reunion on TV tonight, with Bill Cosby and Phylicia Rashad appearing on separate shows, and an official one, with Robert Plant and Jimmy Page, formerly of Led Zeppelin, doing an "Unledded" concert on MTV.* "The Cosby Mysteries" (8-9 p.m., Channel 2)
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