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NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | January 13, 1993
The Carroll County Liquor Board tentatively approved transferring the liquor license for the Paddock Wine and Spirit Shop in Woodbine yesterday, pending receipt of police records for one of the applicants.Board members also granted a Class B restaurant license to Carol Ann and Anthony Trombetta for the Harvest Inn in Sykesville. The couple recently purchased the restaurant from Mrs. Trombetta's parents, Harry P. and Jean G. Fisher."They are both the type of children that you can go to bed at night and don't worry, because you know they are doing the right thing," said Anthony's father, Vincent W. Trombetta, in support of his son's liquor license application.
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SPORTS
By Melissa Isaacson and Melissa Isaacson,Chicago Tribune | October 13, 2007
I was never a big horse person. The closest I had come to covering horse racing before the spring of 2005 was auto racing, which is to say not close at all. And then I met John Henry. I had come to the Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington to do a story on the champion thoroughbred's 30th birthday, and I was amused to find a character not unlike an aging Vito Corleone in The Godfather, regarded with equal parts respect and fear. If this were a retirement home for horses, I thought, we should all be so lucky one day. He was housed in the Hall of Champions, where round-the-clock trainers cared for him in his 20-by-20-foot stall surrounded by windows and leading out into a private, lush one-acre paddock.
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SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | February 21, 1998
The star's role of favorite in the 124th Kentucky Derby may be won not only on the racetrack, but also in the paddock. That's where Coronado's Quest, owned by Stuart S. Janney III, must overcome his demons.Watch the chestnut colt today on ESPN before the Fountain of Youth Stakes at Gulfstream Park, and you may learn where Coronado's Quest ranks with other 3-year-olds aiming for the Derby on May 2 at Churchill Downs.On the track, Coronado's Quest may be the top prospect. Racing in the colors of Janney, who lives in Butler, near Reisterstown, the Forty Niner colt has won five of seven starts, including the Cowdin, Nashua and Remsen stakes last fall at Aqueduct.
SPORTS
By SANDRA McKEE and SANDRA McKEE,SUN STAFF | August 14, 2005
Yesterday morning, track veterinarian Forrest Peacock was checking horses at Pimlico Race Course, making sure they were in condition to race and withstand the blazing heat. In 40 years, he said, he has never seen a horse expire from a direct heat-related problem, but he has seen many cases of heatstroke. "Oh, God, yes, we see heatstroke," he said. "Some horses don't sweat, and sometimes you'll see one that seems to be a chronic repeater. And there are times when they've been in the throes of heatstroke and bumped their heads and died."
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | February 24, 2004
Trainer Michael Dickinson plans to work Triple Crown candidate Tapit between races at Laurel Park tomorrow. Permission was granted for the winner of last fall's Laurel Futurity to come to the paddock with the horses entered to run in the sixth race. Tapit will remain in the paddock until the race is official, then will work seven furlongs on the main track.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Giuliano | September 28, 1990
The PaddockWhere: Marriott's Hunt Valley Inn, 245 Shawan Road.Hours: 11 a.m.- midnight Sundays and Mondays, 11 a.m.- 2 a.m. Tuesdays to Saturdays.Menu: Burgers, sandwiches, crab cakes, soups and appetizers.Credit cards: AE, D, DC, MC, V.Call: 785-7000. You can't miss the '50s-themed nightclub Wurlitzer's at Marriott's Hunt Valley Inn, with its pink neon sign and pulsating music.But there's a second nightspot in this hotel, and it's a horse of an entirely different color. While Wurlitzer's is noisy and nostalgia-fixated, the Paddock is a quiet pub. While Wurlitzer's swings until the wee hours, most of the business types at the Paddock wisely head to bed by midnight.
SPORTS
By Nestor Aparicio and Nestor Aparicio,Evening Sun Staff | April 11, 1991
Binghamton coach John Paddock scoffs at Rob Laird's wisdom concerning the Rangers' play last weekend.Jacks coach Laird said earlier in the week that the Rangers played as well as they could in taking a pair of games last weekend in Binghamton. Paddock said his team can always get better."How do you begin to judge how good a team can play?" Paddock said. "I think people who would say that a team peaked too early and failed are looking for excuses. We go out every night to win hockey games.
NEWS
October 19, 2003
On October 17, 2003 EDITH REGINA (nee McKenzie) BARNETTE, beloved wife of Francis Barnette, loving mother of Maria Eleanor Barnette. Cherished grandmother of Michael Francis Anuszewski and Mackenzie Elizabeth Thompson. Dear sister of C. Virginia Wolfe and the late Edmund Howard McKenzie. Aunt of Catherine Jennifer Paddock, great-aunt of Collin Mitchell Wolfe and Carson Wesley Wolfe Paddock. Friends may call at the family owned and operated Slack Funeral Home P.A., 3871 Old Columbia Pike, Ellicott City on Tuesday 7 to 9 P.M., where a Christian wake service will be held at 8 P.M. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated on Wednesday 10 A.M. at St. Paul's Catholic Church, 3755 St. Paul's St., Ellicott City.
SPORTS
June 18, 1991
The New Jersey Devils yesterday ended months of speculation on who would become head coach and retained Tom McVie.McVie, 55, guided an inconsistent team to a 4-5-4 record after being named interim head coach on March 4, replacing John Cunniff. The team played its best hockey of the season in the first round of the playoffs, losing to the eventual Stanley Cup champion Pittsburgh Penguins in seven games."I feel I'm the man for the job," McVie, 56, said in a conference call from his home in Portland, Ore. "I felt when the evaluation was done and everybody sat back, I was the man for the job."
SPORTS
By Melissa Isaacson and Melissa Isaacson,Chicago Tribune | October 13, 2007
I was never a big horse person. The closest I had come to covering horse racing before the spring of 2005 was auto racing, which is to say not close at all. And then I met John Henry. I had come to the Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington to do a story on the champion thoroughbred's 30th birthday, and I was amused to find a character not unlike an aging Vito Corleone in The Godfather, regarded with equal parts respect and fear. If this were a retirement home for horses, I thought, we should all be so lucky one day. He was housed in the Hall of Champions, where round-the-clock trainers cared for him in his 20-by-20-foot stall surrounded by windows and leading out into a private, lush one-acre paddock.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | February 24, 2004
Trainer Michael Dickinson plans to work Triple Crown candidate Tapit between races at Laurel Park tomorrow. Permission was granted for the winner of last fall's Laurel Futurity to come to the paddock with the horses entered to run in the sixth race. Tapit will remain in the paddock until the race is official, then will work seven furlongs on the main track.
NEWS
October 19, 2003
On October 17, 2003 EDITH REGINA (nee McKenzie) BARNETTE, beloved wife of Francis Barnette, loving mother of Maria Eleanor Barnette. Cherished grandmother of Michael Francis Anuszewski and Mackenzie Elizabeth Thompson. Dear sister of C. Virginia Wolfe and the late Edmund Howard McKenzie. Aunt of Catherine Jennifer Paddock, great-aunt of Collin Mitchell Wolfe and Carson Wesley Wolfe Paddock. Friends may call at the family owned and operated Slack Funeral Home P.A., 3871 Old Columbia Pike, Ellicott City on Tuesday 7 to 9 P.M., where a Christian wake service will be held at 8 P.M. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated on Wednesday 10 A.M. at St. Paul's Catholic Church, 3755 St. Paul's St., Ellicott City.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | February 6, 2002
National Grand Prix officials said yesterday at a Washington news conference that the Kennedy Krieger Institute of Baltimore, an international center for children with autism, cerebral palsy and other developmental disabilities, is the official charity of the inaugural race, July 19-21 on the grounds of RFK Stadium. The 40,000 reserved grandstand seats and 35,000 general admission tickets for the Grand Prix weekend go on sale today at 10 a.m. The Grand Prix includes races in the American Le Mans, Trans-Am and World Challenge GT Series, a pro-celebrity race that includes Timothy Dalton (a former James Bond)
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and By Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | December 25, 2001
The front paddock at Halcyon Farm has never looked better. The two mares grazing inside the fence along Greenspring Avenue in Lutherville have been reunited in a charitable act worthy of the jolliest Saint Nick. What's more, the mares carry a rich tradition into this holiday season: They are believed to be the oldest living mares from the fabled Sagamore Farm of Alfred G. Vanderbilt. Low Cut is the gray, Shiver My Timbers the bay. On Jan. 1, when all thoroughbreds become a year older, Low Cut will turn 24, Shiver My Timbers 28. Living the quiet life of pensioned broodmares, they have perhaps never been happier.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lauren Weiner and Lauren Weiner,Special to the Sun | July 9, 2000
"Susan Sontag: The Making of an Icon" by Carl Rollyson and Lisa Paddock. W.W. Norton and Company. 370 pages. $29.95. The woman that Carl Rollyson and Lisa Paddock depict in their biography "Susan Sontag: The Making of an Icon" became a household name by arguing, rebelling, playing the contrarian -- often toward her own previously expressed views and ideas. Her first revolt -- the one that brought her early fame -- was against the Freudianism that pervaded the world of the intellect in the 1950s and 1960s.
FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly | October 16, 1999
THE HORSE THAT RAN in Wednesday afternoon's 10th race at Laurel was no ordinary entry. His name was Joe Kelly, proudly named after my father, the Joe Kelly who resides in the Guilford Avenue house that I so often recall.My father joined this newspaper in 1944 and soon began a lengthy career covering horse racing. One of my earliest childhood memories is the drive to Pimlico, over the spindly iron Belvedere Avenue Bridge to Old Hilltop. My father retains the same parking space today as he had in 1954, perhaps 1944.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | February 6, 2002
National Grand Prix officials said yesterday at a Washington news conference that the Kennedy Krieger Institute of Baltimore, an international center for children with autism, cerebral palsy and other developmental disabilities, is the official charity of the inaugural race, July 19-21 on the grounds of RFK Stadium. The 40,000 reserved grandstand seats and 35,000 general admission tickets for the Grand Prix weekend go on sale today at 10 a.m. The Grand Prix includes races in the American Le Mans, Trans-Am and World Challenge GT Series, a pro-celebrity race that includes Timothy Dalton (a former James Bond)
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and By Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | December 25, 2001
The front paddock at Halcyon Farm has never looked better. The two mares grazing inside the fence along Greenspring Avenue in Lutherville have been reunited in a charitable act worthy of the jolliest Saint Nick. What's more, the mares carry a rich tradition into this holiday season: They are believed to be the oldest living mares from the fabled Sagamore Farm of Alfred G. Vanderbilt. Low Cut is the gray, Shiver My Timbers the bay. On Jan. 1, when all thoroughbreds become a year older, Low Cut will turn 24, Shiver My Timbers 28. Living the quiet life of pensioned broodmares, they have perhaps never been happier.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | August 9, 1998
OCEANPORT, N.J. -- The striking chestnut colt pranced into the paddock beneath the grand European fern leaf and American purple leaf beech trees. Like a new penny, his coat glistened in the sunlight of the Jersey shore.Eyes wide and alert, he glanced at a woman in a black dress outside the fence. He snapped his head back and looked straight ahead toward the oak saddling stall, into which he stepped willingly, stood quietly and after a few minutes exited peaceably.This was Coronado's Quest, the transformed version -- at least that's what the colt's trainer Shug McGaughey and owner Stuart S. Janney III hope.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | February 21, 1998
The star's role of favorite in the 124th Kentucky Derby may be won not only on the racetrack, but also in the paddock. That's where Coronado's Quest, owned by Stuart S. Janney III, must overcome his demons.Watch the chestnut colt today on ESPN before the Fountain of Youth Stakes at Gulfstream Park, and you may learn where Coronado's Quest ranks with other 3-year-olds aiming for the Derby on May 2 at Churchill Downs.On the track, Coronado's Quest may be the top prospect. Racing in the colors of Janney, who lives in Butler, near Reisterstown, the Forty Niner colt has won five of seven starts, including the Cowdin, Nashua and Remsen stakes last fall at Aqueduct.
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