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By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 4, 2004
Reisterstown Road sometimes feels like a headache looking for a place to land, with so much traffic, so many stoplights and so many big shopping centers, one right after the other. However, an oasis of calm can be found at Thai Orient, a small restaurant nearly overshadowed by a giant T.J. Maxx in the Valley Centre shopping strip. The restaurant, nearly nine years old, is perfectly clean, but it looks dated inside, with maroon-clad booths and a giant chandelier hovering over a palm tree in the middle of the room.
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By Donna Ellis | February 7, 2012
There was a time when Chinese restaurants abounded in this area. Granted, they still exist in storefronts, specializing in carryout. But many dine-in Chinese restaurants these days have re-invented themselves to include a wide range of culinary genres, not “just” Chinese. One such place is Asian Palace Restaurant &  Bar in Hickory Ridge. Owner Feng Liu opened his doors last July, with a menu that features Chinese, Japanese, Thai and even American cuisines (rack of lamb with mashed potatoes is listed under the house specialties.)
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NEWS
By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,SUN REPORTER | March 15, 2006
THAI AROMA 8815 Baltimore National Pike, Ellicott City //410-480-5100 HOURS // 11:30 a.m.-9:30 p.m. Sundays--Thursdays; 11:30 a.m.-10:30 p.m. Fridays-Saturdays RESTAURANT'S ESTIMATE // 10 minutes READY IN // 10 minutes From the tangy noodles and sauce to the sides of crisp sprouts and carrot shavings, the restaurant really nailed its pad Thai, $10.45. This was the only restaurant to ask us if it was all right to include eggs. Know of a good carryout place? Let us hear about it.Write to sam.sessa@baltsun.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to the Sun | February 7, 2008
What's a suburban shopping center without a Chinese restaurant? Hunan Legend, which has been dispensing egg rolls, chicken lo mein and other tried-and-true dishes from a Howard County village center for a dozen years, is a perfect example of the breed. The restaurant is spacious and brightly lit inside, with white tablecloths on large round tables perfect for sharing food. The unbelievably lengthy menu offers mostly Hunan and Szechwan dishes, and touches down briefly in Thailand with a version of pad Thai.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to the Sun | February 7, 2008
What's a suburban shopping center without a Chinese restaurant? Hunan Legend, which has been dispensing egg rolls, chicken lo mein and other tried-and-true dishes from a Howard County village center for a dozen years, is a perfect example of the breed. The restaurant is spacious and brightly lit inside, with white tablecloths on large round tables perfect for sharing food. The unbelievably lengthy menu offers mostly Hunan and Szechwan dishes, and touches down briefly in Thailand with a version of pad Thai.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella | April 18, 1992
804 N. Charles St. Hours: 11:30 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. Tuesdays to Fridays; 4 p.m. to 10 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. (410) 752-5857. Squeezed in a block of larger restaurants, Thairish is like that Volkswagen that spurts out clown after clown: How can so much come out of something so small?The cafe/carryout (there are two counter tops with stools for eat-ins) serves up splendidly flavorful Thai specialties, prepared right before your eyes by the genial proprietor. A veteran of other restaurants in town, such as the Museum Cafe, he's great fun to watch in his tidy kitchen, which is bravely in full view of customers: With the precise, no-extra-movements style of the well-trained, he splashes ingredients into a pot on one burner and shakes a sizzling skillet on another.
NEWS
By LIZ ATWOOD and LIZ ATWOOD,SUN STAFF | July 17, 2002
If you're soft on ice cream If you love ice cream, you can have ice-cream-parlor treats at home with Black & Decker's Arctic Twister Ice Cream Mixer. The mixer lets you take store-bought ice cream or frozen yogurt, add your choice of candy, fruit or nuts and make a soft-serve ice-cream treat. The price of indulgence: between $65 and $75. The machine is available at mass merchant and discount stores. For more information, call 800-231-9786 or visit www.blackanddecker.com. Pies, preserves and new fare at fair If you'd like to show off your homemade pie or canned preserves, don't forget to preregister for the Maryland State Fair on or before Aug. 2. Ribbons and cash prizes will be awarded in all competitions and all entries will be on display beginning opening day, Friday, Aug. 23. New competitions this year include Kids Gold Medal Cookie Contest, Spam Kid Chef of the Year and an Herb-Ox Bouillon Comfort Food Contest.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE | October 10, 2007
At a time when some places are moving away from tapas back to more traditional menus, the new Ranazul (8171 Maple Lawn Blvd., 301-498-9666) in Maple Lawn has embraced the concept wholeheartedly. "An international fusion kind of thing" is how Chad Price, the restaurant's marketing director, described the cuisine behind the small plates. That means Salmon-Avocado Sushi (sliced salmon with Chinese mustard and seasoned avocado on a bed of seaweed salad) as well as Arepas (corn cake with crab, shrimp and tomato ragout)
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 27, 2002
I've always figured that anybody could find something they like in the 800 block of North Charles Street, whether it's good Chinese, good Afghan or a good martini. After a recent visit to Thairish, I would add very good Thai food to that list as well. The oddly named eatery sits in a tiny 500-square-foot space and offers seating for 18 people. In a nice touch, a fresh flower sat in a vase on each of the three tables. Thai prints and maps decorate the walls. Thai native Kerrigan Kitikul opened the restaurant more than a decade ago and still does the cooking.
FEATURES
By Sujata Banerjee | December 15, 1990
THAI RESTAURANT, 3316 Greenmount Ave. Open 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. and 5 to 11 p.m. Monday through Saturday, 5 p.m. to 11 p.m. Sunday. Phone: 889-7303.Baltimore's original Thai Restaurant is arguably its best, providing lightening-fast service whether carrying food out or dining in the pleasant pink room decorated with Thai paintings.The greatest artistry, however, will be found on your plate -- beautifully garnished, crisp-tender combinations of vegetables, meats and spices and none of the heavy, gelatinous sauces that are found in many Chinese restaurants.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE | October 10, 2007
At a time when some places are moving away from tapas back to more traditional menus, the new Ranazul (8171 Maple Lawn Blvd., 301-498-9666) in Maple Lawn has embraced the concept wholeheartedly. "An international fusion kind of thing" is how Chad Price, the restaurant's marketing director, described the cuisine behind the small plates. That means Salmon-Avocado Sushi (sliced salmon with Chinese mustard and seasoned avocado on a bed of seaweed salad) as well as Arepas (corn cake with crab, shrimp and tomato ragout)
ENTERTAINMENT
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 30, 2006
Efforts have been made to gussy up this new Thai restaurant in a Perry Hall shopping center. The track lighting and shabby-looking chairs could make the space depressing, but colorful tapestries and stylized paintings of flowers go far to brighten the room. But it's the smile of owner Bangone Khambay, who bustles around taking orders and filling water glasses, that makes Bouala's Thai Restaurant seem so sunny. Khambay, who was born in Laos and lived in Thailand, opened her restaurant in Perry Hall because there are no other Thai restaurants nearby, she said.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | March 19, 2006
WHEN I LAST REVIEWED BAN THAI, I worried that it might not survive. That was in 1993. I'm not sure how this pleasant and decidedly unhip little Thai restaurant has managed to hang on -- and not only survive but flourish for 13 years. Ban Thai has good food if you order right, but that's not always enough to save a Charles Street restaurant. The problem is that it has the feel of a neighborhood eatery, but the neighborhood is mostly office buildings, empty at night. After 13 years, Ban Thai is beginning to have a comfy retro appeal, so maybe people try it at lunch and come back for dinner.
NEWS
By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,SUN REPORTER | March 15, 2006
THAI AROMA 8815 Baltimore National Pike, Ellicott City //410-480-5100 HOURS // 11:30 a.m.-9:30 p.m. Sundays--Thursdays; 11:30 a.m.-10:30 p.m. Fridays-Saturdays RESTAURANT'S ESTIMATE // 10 minutes READY IN // 10 minutes From the tangy noodles and sauce to the sides of crisp sprouts and carrot shavings, the restaurant really nailed its pad Thai, $10.45. This was the only restaurant to ask us if it was all right to include eggs. Know of a good carryout place? Let us hear about it.Write to sam.sessa@baltsun.
NEWS
By ABIGAIL TUCKER and ABIGAIL TUCKER,SUN REPORTER | October 23, 2005
Nothing sends a shiver through me like a phone ringing very late at night. It's the time when people are prone to pass away. It's also, or so I've noticed lately, when they tend to get engaged. Alas, no one calls in the wee hours to propose to me. I'm merely part of the telephone tree of single women in their mid-20s relaying the good fortunes of others: elementary school chums, former snoring bunkmates, even old and bitter foes. Usually, it's the girl's best friend (henceforth her maid of honor)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 1, 2005
The Lotte Plaza on U.S. 40 in Ellicott City has become a culinary destination for anyone who likes Asian food. In addition to the sprawling Lotte supermarket, with its enormous selection of sauces, spices, seafood and vegetables, there are several Asian restaurants in the shopping center. Relatively new to the plaza is Thai Aroma, which took over the spot vacated by House of Asia about a year ago. The restaurant is pleasantly spacious, the tables covered with white cloths and the service attentive.
NEWS
By ABIGAIL TUCKER and ABIGAIL TUCKER,SUN REPORTER | October 23, 2005
Nothing sends a shiver through me like a phone ringing very late at night. It's the time when people are prone to pass away. It's also, or so I've noticed lately, when they tend to get engaged. Alas, no one calls in the wee hours to propose to me. I'm merely part of the telephone tree of single women in their mid-20s relaying the good fortunes of others: elementary school chums, former snoring bunkmates, even old and bitter foes. Usually, it's the girl's best friend (henceforth her maid of honor)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | March 4, 1994
Everything's a trade-off. You know the food might not be as good at your neighborhood Chinese carryout as at a full-fledged restaurant, but it's going to cost you half as much. (Feel free to prove me wrong by sending me the names of carryouts with superb food.)I expected the same to be true of Thairish, a tiny Thai carryout/eatery. To some extent it is -- if you compare Thairish to the best of Baltimore's Thai restaurants. But for inexpensive carryout food, this is as good as you're going to get.The menu is quite simple, with such dishes as pad thai, three kinds of red curry (hot, hotter, hottest)
NEWS
By Sheila Young and Sheila Young,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 29, 2005
Recently, I asked friends from Silver Spring who know Thai food and culture very well to recommend a good Thai restaurant in Howard County. They immediately suggested Bangkok Garden. My husband and I invited them to accompany us because my friends, Adele and David Schwartz, are experts who also pronounce the names of Thai dishes correctly. To expand the number of new dishes we could try, Adele brought along her sister and brother-in-law, Sheila and Reuven Lev-Tov. Reuven said that whenever he goes to a Thai restaurant, he compares it with Bangkok Garden - his gold standard.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and By Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | January 30, 2005
It may be that Talay -- Thai for ocean -- will succeed where others have failed. The Aliceanna location, ostensibly in Fells Point but close to the edge of Canton, was the home of an Italian and before that a Greek restaurant. But people downtown who want Greek or Italian food tend to go to Greektown or Little Italy. There isn't such an obvious destination when you have a sudden craving for chicken satay or pad thai. Why not then head for Talay, Baltimore's newest Thai restaurant? One word: service.
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