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June 23, 1993
Zenith Data-Packard Bell allianceZenith Data Systems, a notebook-computer specialist owned by France's struggling Groupe Bull SA, announced an alliance yesterday with Packard Bell, a leading maker of desktop personal computers. The move is the second major consolidation in a month involving two of the nation's 10 largest personal-computer makers.Zenith Data will pay an undisclosed sum for 19.9 percent of the privately held Packard Bell. The companies will work together to design and build desktop PCs but will market products under separate brand names.
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BUSINESS
By Cox News Service | August 28, 2007
SAN DIEGO -- Acer Inc. has long tried to get a foothold in the United States, but giants like Dell Inc. and Hewlett Packard Co. have constantly tripped up the Taiwanese computer maker. Yesterday, Acer opened a back door into the market, buying Gateway Inc. to instantly become the No. 3 PC seller behind HP and Dell, both in the United States and internationally. Acer's $710 million purchase of Irvine, Calif.-based Gateway marks a final chapter for a pioneer in the U.S. personal computer business whose once iconic cow-spotted boxes and "Gateway Country Stores" harkened back to its all-American roots on an Iowa farm.
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BUSINESS
By MICHAEL J. HIMOWITZ | January 16, 1995
A while back I decided to investigate life in the high speed lane -- to drive the PC equivalent of a nitromethane-fueled dragster.It feels wonderful. And with the prices falling as fast as horsepower is increasing, you can do it without mortgaging the house and kids.The machine I tried out was a Packard Bell Pentium 90 multimedia outfit, which packs a lot of punch for a price in the $2,500 to $3,000 range.The machine uses Intel's fastest microprocessor, and that's why I held off writing this review, even though I like the computer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 9, 1998
I would like to buy a new, faster computer but am at a loss as to what to buy. I have looked at many models, from the less expensive packages for under $1,000 to the more expensive ones around $1,700. I have also gotten a quote from our computer guy at work who builds computers as a sideline. Several co-workers seem to be satisfied with his work.Would it be better to purchase an upgradeable custom system or one by a large company like Packard Bell, Gateway, etc.? Can you make any suggestions on current good buys?
BUSINESS
By Cox News Service | August 28, 2007
SAN DIEGO -- Acer Inc. has long tried to get a foothold in the United States, but giants like Dell Inc. and Hewlett Packard Co. have constantly tripped up the Taiwanese computer maker. Yesterday, Acer opened a back door into the market, buying Gateway Inc. to instantly become the No. 3 PC seller behind HP and Dell, both in the United States and internationally. Acer's $710 million purchase of Irvine, Calif.-based Gateway marks a final chapter for a pioneer in the U.S. personal computer business whose once iconic cow-spotted boxes and "Gateway Country Stores" harkened back to its all-American roots on an Iowa farm.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | January 9, 1997
SAN FRANCISCO -- Personal computers powered by Intel Corp.'s new Pentium chip began hitting store shelves yesterday, an event that is expected to revive interest in PCs after a gloomy holiday sales season.The new MMX chip will help PCs display video with the clarity of television sets and play audio with the quality of stereo equipment, bringing personal computers closer to becoming multimedia terminals."Based on what we're hearing from retailers, we see demand as very good at least through the first quarter," said Mal Ransom, senior vice president for marketing at Packard Bell NEC Inc.Packard Bell's fourth-quarter sales were flat, compared with the year-earlier period, largely because some buyers were awaiting the new chip, Ransom said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 9, 1998
I would like to buy a new, faster computer but am at a loss as to what to buy. I have looked at many models, from the less expensive packages for under $1,000 to the more expensive ones around $1,700. I have also gotten a quote from our computer guy at work who builds computers as a sideline. Several co-workers seem to be satisfied with his work.Would it be better to purchase an upgradeable custom system or one by a large company like Packard Bell, Gateway, etc.? Can you make any suggestions on current good buys?
BUSINESS
By Stephen Manes and Stephen Manes,New York Times News Service | February 3, 1997
THE MAGIC PRICE of $1,000 for a personal computer is one that has until recently been breached mostly with fine print reading "monitor extra." Now that new models complete with screens are available for under a grand, what do you sacrifice?With the $999 Packard Bell C115A, the answer is right before your eyes: picture quality. The "14-inch" model 1010 monitor delivers images measuring about 13 diagonal inches.It has an extremely coarse "dot-pitch" of 0.39 millimeters in an era when 0.28 is typical, lacks a coating to eliminate the many reflections of its highly curved screen and can muster only a flickery maximum refresh rate of 60 hertz at the 800-by-600 resolution that is set until you change it.Fuzziness, graininess and various forms of distortion add up to a veritable eyestrain machine.
BUSINESS
By Rory J. O'Connor and Rory J. O'Connor,Knight-Ridder News Service | April 13, 1992
SAN JOSE, Calif. -- Attention, shoppers: There's some unusual merchandise moving onto store shelves alongside television sets, power tools and children's clothes -- Apple computers.In the latest move by computer manufacturers to take their wares to where people shop, Cupertino, Calif.-based Apple Computer Inc. has announced a deal with Sears to let the retail giant sell several models of Macintosh computers.Apple's Macintoshes will initially sell in 70 Sears stores that have Office Center outlets.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Einstein and David Einstein,SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE | August 31, 1998
I've been thinking about getting an Apple iMac, but I'm worried I won't be able to get a printer that will work with it because it has only a USB port. Is anybody coming out with a USB printer soon? And what about other peripherals, such as mice and Zip drives?All major printer-makers will have USB models within the next few months that will work with any computer that has a USB port. Also, companies are starting to sell cables to convert a standard parallel-port printer to USB. In fact, Hewlett-Packard already has announced USB cables for its DeskJet 670C and 690C printers, and Epson has announced one for its Stylus 600.USB-compatible mice are available from market leaders Microsoft and Logitech.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Einstein and David Einstein,SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE | August 31, 1998
I've been thinking about getting an Apple iMac, but I'm worried I won't be able to get a printer that will work with it because it has only a USB port. Is anybody coming out with a USB printer soon? And what about other peripherals, such as mice and Zip drives?All major printer-makers will have USB models within the next few months that will work with any computer that has a USB port. Also, companies are starting to sell cables to convert a standard parallel-port printer to USB. In fact, Hewlett-Packard already has announced USB cables for its DeskJet 670C and 690C printers, and Epson has announced one for its Stylus 600.USB-compatible mice are available from market leaders Microsoft and Logitech.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | December 27, 1997
TOKYO -- NEC Corp., Japan's largest computer seller, will lend $300 million to Packard Bell NEC Inc. and boost its stake in the United States' second largest computer seller to 49 percent by converting preferred shares to common shares.The loan is necessary to support Sacramento, Calif.-based Packard Bell NEC, which has seen its business hurt by falling prices of home computers, said Seijiro Yokoyama, an NEC vice president, adding that the U.S. company needs to cultivate the corporate market.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | March 13, 1997
ORLANDO, Fla. -- Chris Shipman of Orlando treated herself to a new computer in January. She brought it home, fired up her America Online program and wandered in cyberspace for the first time.It was all pretty thrilling for the first 30 days. That is, until Shipman got her first AOL bill in March -- for more than $600.Worse yet, the money had been deducted directly from her checking account."I was stunned," said Shipman, 32, a waitress at Walt Disney World's Polynesian hotel. "I was shaking.
BUSINESS
By Stephen Manes and Stephen Manes,New York Times News Service | February 3, 1997
THE MAGIC PRICE of $1,000 for a personal computer is one that has until recently been breached mostly with fine print reading "monitor extra." Now that new models complete with screens are available for under a grand, what do you sacrifice?With the $999 Packard Bell C115A, the answer is right before your eyes: picture quality. The "14-inch" model 1010 monitor delivers images measuring about 13 diagonal inches.It has an extremely coarse "dot-pitch" of 0.39 millimeters in an era when 0.28 is typical, lacks a coating to eliminate the many reflections of its highly curved screen and can muster only a flickery maximum refresh rate of 60 hertz at the 800-by-600 resolution that is set until you change it.Fuzziness, graininess and various forms of distortion add up to a veritable eyestrain machine.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | January 9, 1997
SAN FRANCISCO -- Personal computers powered by Intel Corp.'s new Pentium chip began hitting store shelves yesterday, an event that is expected to revive interest in PCs after a gloomy holiday sales season.The new MMX chip will help PCs display video with the clarity of television sets and play audio with the quality of stereo equipment, bringing personal computers closer to becoming multimedia terminals."Based on what we're hearing from retailers, we see demand as very good at least through the first quarter," said Mal Ransom, senior vice president for marketing at Packard Bell NEC Inc.Packard Bell's fourth-quarter sales were flat, compared with the year-earlier period, largely because some buyers were awaiting the new chip, Ransom said.
BUSINESS
By MICHAEL J. HIMOWITZ | January 16, 1995
A while back I decided to investigate life in the high speed lane -- to drive the PC equivalent of a nitromethane-fueled dragster.It feels wonderful. And with the prices falling as fast as horsepower is increasing, you can do it without mortgaging the house and kids.The machine I tried out was a Packard Bell Pentium 90 multimedia outfit, which packs a lot of punch for a price in the $2,500 to $3,000 range.The machine uses Intel's fastest microprocessor, and that's why I held off writing this review, even though I like the computer.
BUSINESS
By PETER H. LEWIS | July 19, 1993
Just as in "Jurassic Park," the big dinosaurs -- Compaq, IBM, Digital and Hewlett-Packard among them -- are coming back to life and, boy, are they hungry. With the ferocity of a tyrannosaur, these giants of the computer industry are stalking and chewing up any personal computer makers not big enough, smart enough or nimble enough to survive.The weaker PC makers have no choice but to scurry for cover. CompuAdd Corp., following the lead of Everex Systems Inc., recently filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection and laid off more than half its workers.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | December 27, 1997
TOKYO -- NEC Corp., Japan's largest computer seller, will lend $300 million to Packard Bell NEC Inc. and boost its stake in the United States' second largest computer seller to 49 percent by converting preferred shares to common shares.The loan is necessary to support Sacramento, Calif.-based Packard Bell NEC, which has seen its business hurt by falling prices of home computers, said Seijiro Yokoyama, an NEC vice president, adding that the U.S. company needs to cultivate the corporate market.
BUSINESS
By PETER H. LEWIS | July 19, 1993
Just as in "Jurassic Park," the big dinosaurs -- Compaq, IBM, Digital and Hewlett-Packard among them -- are coming back to life and, boy, are they hungry. With the ferocity of a tyrannosaur, these giants of the computer industry are stalking and chewing up any personal computer makers not big enough, smart enough or nimble enough to survive.The weaker PC makers have no choice but to scurry for cover. CompuAdd Corp., following the lead of Everex Systems Inc., recently filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection and laid off more than half its workers.
BUSINESS
June 23, 1993
Zenith Data-Packard Bell allianceZenith Data Systems, a notebook-computer specialist owned by France's struggling Groupe Bull SA, announced an alliance yesterday with Packard Bell, a leading maker of desktop personal computers. The move is the second major consolidation in a month involving two of the nation's 10 largest personal-computer makers.Zenith Data will pay an undisclosed sum for 19.9 percent of the privately held Packard Bell. The companies will work together to design and build desktop PCs but will market products under separate brand names.
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