Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPack Of Cigarettes
IN THE NEWS

Pack Of Cigarettes

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Deborah Bach and Deborah Bach,SUN STAFF | July 12, 2000
Blunt messages on the sides of cigarette packs, such as "cigarettes can kill you" and "cigarettes cause cancer," just aren't blunt enough, apparently. At least for Canada. As of January, it will be impossible to pick up a pack of cigarettes north of the border without being confronted by graphic images of damaged hearts, diseased gums, cancerous lungs and flaccid cigarettes suggesting impotence. New regulations recently passed by the federal government require all cigarettes sold in the country - imports included - to carry the explicit images, which will cover 50 percent of every package's back and front.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Richard Irwin | June 30, 2008
Baltimore Southeastern Robbery try/shooting : Two men were walking in the 1600 block of E. Pratt St. about 1:15 a.m. Saturday on their way home from work when they were stopped by three men, one armed with a handgun, who demanded their money. One of the victims was shot in the right leg before the gunman and his accomplices fled on foot. The wounded man was treated at Johns Hopkins Hospital and was reported in fair condition. Theft : A GPS device valued at $300 was stolen over the weekend from a 2004 BMW parked in the 100 block of S. East Ave. Theft : Someone broke into a 1998 Nissan Altima parked in the 2700 block of E. Baltimore St. over the weekend and stole an AM-FM radio and a digital camera.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 19, 1996
Two men, one with a gun, attacked and robbed a 15-year-old Millersville boy of a pack of cigarettes and a lighter Monday as he walked behind the Metro Food Market in the 600 block of Old Mill Road.The boy told police when two men 18 to 20 years old approached him shortly after 9 p.m. behind the store. One grabbed him in a choke hold, and the other placed a gun to his head and demanded money, police said. The boy said he had no money, so the men emptied his pockets, stealing a pack of cigarettes and a lighter, police said.
NEWS
December 26, 2007
A pack of five apple-flavored Black & Mild little cigars costs slightly less than a pack of cigarettes. Next month, it will cost a lot less. That's because while Gov. Martin O'Malley and the Maryland General Assembly chose to raise the tax on a pack of cigarettes by one dollar during this fall's special session, they neglected to raise taxes for any other form of tobacco. It's a glaring omission that needs to be corrected as soon as possible. Cigars, pipe tobacco, snuff and the like raise many of the same health concerns that cigarettes do. A little cigar, for instance, is inhaled just like a cigarette (an unfiltered one, at that)
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | December 30, 1998
Star skater Tara Lipinski braved the chilly rain yesterday to bring a simple message to a few dozen children slipping and sliding across a wet ice rink in downtown Baltimore:Skating is cool. Smoking is not.It was a terrible day for ice skating, at least outdoors, but the 16-year-old Olympic gold medalist had a different purpose in mind when she stopped by the Rash Field rink at the Inner Harbor. Huddled under an umbrella, she joined a half-dozen student leaders from across Maryland in rallying to raise the state's cigarette tax to discourage teen smoking.
NEWS
March 21, 1996
A man who robbed a High's convenience store in Finksburg on Tuesday may be the same gunman who robbed a Hampstead convenience store last week, state police said yesterday.Investigators described the man as white, about 25, 5 feet 6 inches tall, 140 pounds and sporting a three-day growth of beard.He was wearing a tan parka with a fur hood and bluejeans.In the Finksburg incident at 10: 45 p.m. in the 3900 block of Sykesville Road, the robber laid a blue-steel, semiautomatic pistol on the counter and demanded money after asking to buy a pack of cigarettes.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Sun Staff Writer | May 4, 1994
Susan M. Fila, the Baltimore lawyer charged with plotting to kill her law firm partner, has been placed in protective custody at the Baltimore City Detention Center as a result of a newspaper article identifying her as a drug informant, a corrections official said.Ms. Fila -- who last week was assaulted at the jail in a fight over a pack of cigarettes -- was moved into a higher-security area of the jail yesterday morning, said LaMont Flanagan, the commissioner the Baltimore City Detention Center.
NEWS
By David Simon and David Simon,Staff Writer | March 30, 1992
In the late 1960s and early 1970s, one Northeast state after another raised excise taxes on cigarettes and waited for the money to roll in. But what actually rolled into states such as Pennsylvania and New York was semi-truck after semi-truck loaded with smuggled cases of cheap cigarettes from North Carolina.Yet, as Maryland legislators now consider tax proposals that could raise state taxes on cigarettes by as much as 20 cents a pack, law enforcement officials are not exactly filling the sandbags for a coming flood.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff writer | August 18, 1991
For decades, governments have been warning against the evils of smoking and drinking while at the same time depending on those activitiesfor millions of dollars in tax revenue.And while the tax on a pack of cigarettes, a fifth of vodka or a six-pack of beer has been on the rise for years, the amount of revenue Carroll -- and the rest of Maryland -- takes in from the so-called sin taxes has been on the decline since the 1980s.The county's share of the $87.9 million collected statewide in the fiscal year that ended June 30 was $443,605, down 3 percent from the amount Carroll received a year earlier.
NEWS
By Richard Irwin | June 30, 2008
Baltimore Southeastern Robbery try/shooting : Two men were walking in the 1600 block of E. Pratt St. about 1:15 a.m. Saturday on their way home from work when they were stopped by three men, one armed with a handgun, who demanded their money. One of the victims was shot in the right leg before the gunman and his accomplices fled on foot. The wounded man was treated at Johns Hopkins Hospital and was reported in fair condition. Theft : A GPS device valued at $300 was stolen over the weekend from a 2004 BMW parked in the 100 block of S. East Ave. Theft : Someone broke into a 1998 Nissan Altima parked in the 2700 block of E. Baltimore St. over the weekend and stole an AM-FM radio and a digital camera.
NEWS
By Marc Kilmer | March 27, 2007
Discussions are under way in the General Assembly to raise the tax on cigarettes in Maryland. Although Gov. Martin O'Malley and certain key members of the Assembly are opposed to it, a bipartisan coalition is backing the plan. Raising cigarette taxes, however, brings with it a unique set of problems that may result in less revenue and cost the state more to enforce compliance than advocates claim. If some policymakers get their way, Marylanders will be paying $2 in taxes on each pack of cigarettes they buy in the state.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | February 8, 2001
Gov. Parris N. Glendening and Comptroller William Donald Schaefer both think that contraband cigarettes ought to be destroyed. But that's where their agreement on illegal tobacco ends. The comptroller wants to continue Maryland's tradition of auctioning confiscated cigarettes to tobacco manufacturers, who then usually destroy the products - and directing the sale proceeds to cancer research and tobacco prevention programs. But the governor says the state ought not be in the business of selling cigarettes, even if it costs Maryland an extra $1 million or so in revenues.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | August 26, 2000
Maryland cigarette sales have dropped by 16 percent since last year, the sharpest drop in at least two decades and evidence that last year's tax increase is prompting some smokers to quit. Health advocates and Gov. Parris N. Glendening, who combined forces to push the 30-cents-a-pack increase through the General Assembly last year, said the sales figures vindicate their claim that higher cigarette taxes are good for public health. "It looks like we're clearly headed in the right direction," said Glendening, who initially sought a $1-a-pack increase.
FEATURES
By Deborah Bach and Deborah Bach,SUN STAFF | July 12, 2000
Blunt messages on the sides of cigarette packs, such as "cigarettes can kill you" and "cigarettes cause cancer," just aren't blunt enough, apparently. At least for Canada. As of January, it will be impossible to pick up a pack of cigarettes north of the border without being confronted by graphic images of damaged hearts, diseased gums, cancerous lungs and flaccid cigarettes suggesting impotence. New regulations recently passed by the federal government require all cigarettes sold in the country - imports included - to carry the explicit images, which will cover 50 percent of every package's back and front.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | September 24, 1999
The 30-cents-a-pack increase in state cigarette taxes that took effect July 1 is making Maryland an attractive target for bootleggers who do a thriving business in Northeast states with high tobacco taxes, state regulators say.Since the tax increase took effect, agents from State Comptroller William Donald Schaefer's office said they have made four separate arrests, confiscating 15,000 packs of unstamped cigarettes worth more than $40,000.State officials said three of those arrested were from the New York City area, and that it was not clear whether the cigarettes, purchased in Virginia, were intended for resale in Maryland or destined for sale elsewhere in the Northeast.
NEWS
February 15, 1999
RAISING MARYLAND'S tax on cigarettes by $1 a pack over two years isn't designed primarily to raise more revenue for the state. The main goal is discouraging smoking among this state's teen-agers.Sound evidence suggests that higher cigarette prices do, indeed, deter teen smoking by pricing teens out of the market. This is important in a state where one-third of high school students say they smoke regularly.These statistics pose an alarming public-health problem in the decades ahead. Smoking is a leading cause of lung cancer, emphysema and heart disease.
NEWS
December 26, 2007
A pack of five apple-flavored Black & Mild little cigars costs slightly less than a pack of cigarettes. Next month, it will cost a lot less. That's because while Gov. Martin O'Malley and the Maryland General Assembly chose to raise the tax on a pack of cigarettes by one dollar during this fall's special session, they neglected to raise taxes for any other form of tobacco. It's a glaring omission that needs to be corrected as soon as possible. Cigars, pipe tobacco, snuff and the like raise many of the same health concerns that cigarettes do. A little cigar, for instance, is inhaled just like a cigarette (an unfiltered one, at that)
NEWS
By Peter VanDoren | January 4, 1998
If a politician proposed a tax that disproportionately took money from the poor and minority citizens, how would most people react? Negatively, to say the least. But that's exactly what politicians in Washington and many state capitals are trying to do right now, and one listens in vain for denunciations of the idea. Why? Because the effort is cloaked in the abolitionist rhetoric of the anti-smoking lobby.A little background. Conventional wisdom holds that nonsmoking taxpayers subsidize smokers through various public programs such as Medicare and Medicaid.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | December 30, 1998
Star skater Tara Lipinski braved the chilly rain yesterday to bring a simple message to a few dozen children slipping and sliding across a wet ice rink in downtown Baltimore:Skating is cool. Smoking is not.It was a terrible day for ice skating, at least outdoors, but the 16-year-old Olympic gold medalist had a different purpose in mind when she stopped by the Rash Field rink at the Inner Harbor. Huddled under an umbrella, she joined a half-dozen student leaders from across Maryland in rallying to raise the state's cigarette tax to discourage teen smoking.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF Reporter JoAnna Daemmrich contributed to this article | November 21, 1998
Calling it a flawed deal but one that will save lives, state Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. announced yesterday that Maryland would accept a tobacco settlement that will pay the state more than $4.2 billion, take cigarette ads off billboards and taxis, ban Joe Camel-style cartoons and finance anti-smoking campaigns.Flanked by Gov. Parris N. Glendening and Baltimore attorney Peter G. Angelos, whose law firm is likely to collect several hundred million dollars for handling the state's lawsuit, Curran said he had tried but failed to persuade several other states to hold out for a better deal.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.