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By Myron Beckenstein | October 27, 1991
VISIONS OF INFAMY.William H. Honan.St. Martin's.346 pages. $22.95.THE GREAT PACIFIC WAR.Hector C. Bywater.St. Martin's.321 pages. $22.95.7/8 William Honan believes that the Japanese were entranced by Hector Bywater's 1925 book, "The Great Pacific War" -- so entranced that his book about it, "Visions of Infamy," is subtitled "The Untold Story of How Journalist Hector C. Bywater Devised the Plans that Led to Pearl Harbor." Well, maybe not quite Pearl Harbor, but close enough, he feels.Bywater was a naval scholar and journalist in an age in which the general public seems to have paid naval affairs much more attention than we do today.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Robert Lloyd and Tribune Newspapers | March 14, 2010
It was inevitable after the popular and critical success of their 2001 World War II miniseries "Band of Brothers," which told the story of the drive to conquer Hitler and Mussolini, that executive producers Tom Hanks and Steven Spielberg would return to finish the job. "The Pacific," which tells the story of the war against Japan, is here - it begins tonight on HBO - and is its forerunner's equal in emotive strength, weird poetry and technical bravura....
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NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Special to The Sun | August 20, 1995
"Combined Fleet Decoded: The Secret History of American Intelligence and the Japanese Navy in World War II," by John Prados. New York: Random House. 832 pages. $37.50 Japan's secret diplomatic and military codes became something of an open book during World War II, many historians have written, usually centering on America's failure to prevent Pearl Harbor and its success at Midway, the naval battle which turned the tide against the Japanese.Now, in this sweeping account, John Prados details how intelligence was the "the hidden dimension" that assured victory in the Pacific over Japan's formidable Combined Fleet.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 13, 2005
We interrupt this broadcast for a special bulletin ..." This was what a war-weary world had been waiting for ever since Japanese aircraft appeared over Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941, launching the attack that brought the nation into World War II. In the wake of the dropping of atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in early August, Japan's military leaders vowed to continue fighting on while the country's six-member Supreme Council debated surrendering....
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mark Lewis and Mark Lewis,Los Angeles Times | February 29, 2004
The current wave of World War II nostalgia was set in motion 10 years ago this spring by the 50th anniversary of D-day. Only so many books can be written about the Normandy invasion, so authors serving the insatiable market for "greatest generation" epics soon turned to the Pacific theater for new heroes to celebrate. They found plenty of candidates, but they also found that Pacific war stories require special handling. Devotees of greatest-generation books expect to cheer the heroes and hiss the villains.
NEWS
By Spencer C. Tucker and Spencer C. Tucker,Fort Worth Star-Telegram | November 5, 1995
"Victory at Sea: World War II in the Pacific" by James F. Dunnigan and Albert A. Nofi. William Morrow. 612 pages. $25 This is a splendid book. Unconventional in approach, it is a mine of useful and sometimes little-known information.The authors' interest in war gaming is obvious. For example, what might have happened had Vice Admiral Chuichi Nagumo carried out a third air strike at Pearl Harbor? Or if Vice Admiral W.S. Pye had risked his carriers in an attempt to relieve Wake Island?A chapter titled "The Really Important Stuff" deals with supply and logistics.
NEWS
By ALBERT SEHLSTEDT, Jr | October 20, 1991
Hector Bywater was a British spy, a naval strategist, a correspondent for this newspaper in the 1920s, and the author of novel that described how Japanese warships would attack the United States in World War II.Bywater's prescience was neither coincidental nor Delphic: Rather, naval leaders in both countries read his novel, entitled "The Great Pacific War," and were so impressed by his specific proposals that they copied many of the tactics and strategies Bywater...
NEWS
By Lee Gaillard | December 7, 2001
PHILADELPHIA -- Early that Tuesday morning, terrorist suicide crews piloting hijacked jetliners killed an estimated 4,000 people from 86 countries. Quickly labeled the Pearl Harbor of 2001, Sept. 11 has been acknowledged as a massive intelligence-gathering failure at the highest levels. On that infamous Sunday morning 60 years ago today, against the Pearl Harbor naval base in Hawaii, Japanese Adm. Chuichi Nagumo's Operation Z carrier task force launched its attack that destroyed nearly 200 American aircraft, sank five battleships, severely damaged three cruisers, three destroyers and three auxiliaries, and killed 2,476 U.S. servicemen and civilians.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 13, 2005
We interrupt this broadcast for a special bulletin ..." This was what a war-weary world had been waiting for ever since Japanese aircraft appeared over Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941, launching the attack that brought the nation into World War II. In the wake of the dropping of atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in early August, Japan's military leaders vowed to continue fighting on while the country's six-member Supreme Council debated surrendering....
NEWS
By Jeff Jacoby | February 10, 1995
TO HEAR Smithsonian Institution Secretary Michael Heyman tell it, all that really marred the exhibit planned for the 50th anniversary of the Enola Gay's bombing of Hiroshima was its ambition.In announcing the exhibit would be scrapped, Mr. Heyman confessed to a "number of regrets," and agreed that the planned exhibit suffered from a "fundamental flaw." But he was not referring to the acrid anti-American philosophy that permeated the curators' script. Or its suggestion that the bombing of Hiroshima was motivated by racism.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mark Lewis and Mark Lewis,Los Angeles Times | February 29, 2004
The current wave of World War II nostalgia was set in motion 10 years ago this spring by the 50th anniversary of D-day. Only so many books can be written about the Normandy invasion, so authors serving the insatiable market for "greatest generation" epics soon turned to the Pacific theater for new heroes to celebrate. They found plenty of candidates, but they also found that Pacific war stories require special handling. Devotees of greatest-generation books expect to cheer the heroes and hiss the villains.
NEWS
By Lee Gaillard | December 7, 2001
PHILADELPHIA -- Early that Tuesday morning, terrorist suicide crews piloting hijacked jetliners killed an estimated 4,000 people from 86 countries. Quickly labeled the Pearl Harbor of 2001, Sept. 11 has been acknowledged as a massive intelligence-gathering failure at the highest levels. On that infamous Sunday morning 60 years ago today, against the Pearl Harbor naval base in Hawaii, Japanese Adm. Chuichi Nagumo's Operation Z carrier task force launched its attack that destroyed nearly 200 American aircraft, sank five battleships, severely damaged three cruisers, three destroyers and three auxiliaries, and killed 2,476 U.S. servicemen and civilians.
NEWS
By Spencer C. Tucker and Spencer C. Tucker,Fort Worth Star-Telegram | November 5, 1995
"Victory at Sea: World War II in the Pacific" by James F. Dunnigan and Albert A. Nofi. William Morrow. 612 pages. $25 This is a splendid book. Unconventional in approach, it is a mine of useful and sometimes little-known information.The authors' interest in war gaming is obvious. For example, what might have happened had Vice Admiral Chuichi Nagumo carried out a third air strike at Pearl Harbor? Or if Vice Admiral W.S. Pye had risked his carriers in an attempt to relieve Wake Island?A chapter titled "The Really Important Stuff" deals with supply and logistics.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Special to The Sun | August 20, 1995
"Combined Fleet Decoded: The Secret History of American Intelligence and the Japanese Navy in World War II," by John Prados. New York: Random House. 832 pages. $37.50 Japan's secret diplomatic and military codes became something of an open book during World War II, many historians have written, usually centering on America's failure to prevent Pearl Harbor and its success at Midway, the naval battle which turned the tide against the Japanese.Now, in this sweeping account, John Prados details how intelligence was the "the hidden dimension" that assured victory in the Pacific over Japan's formidable Combined Fleet.
NEWS
By Jeff Jacoby | February 10, 1995
TO HEAR Smithsonian Institution Secretary Michael Heyman tell it, all that really marred the exhibit planned for the 50th anniversary of the Enola Gay's bombing of Hiroshima was its ambition.In announcing the exhibit would be scrapped, Mr. Heyman confessed to a "number of regrets," and agreed that the planned exhibit suffered from a "fundamental flaw." But he was not referring to the acrid anti-American philosophy that permeated the curators' script. Or its suggestion that the bombing of Hiroshima was motivated by racism.
NEWS
By Michael R. Driscoll and Michael R. Driscoll,Staff Writer | June 19, 1992
The Napoleonic Wars and the Royal Navy had C.S. Forester. World War II and the U.S. Navy have Vice Adm. William P. Mack.The 76-year-old Mack, a former superintendent of the U.S Naval Academy, is the main author of a projected 10-volume fictional history of the American destroyers during the Second World War."It's a history of the feeling of sailors in World War II," Mack says. "The equipment and the facts are authentic. The only fiction is the characters."The first two books are "South to Java" (released in 1987 and written with his son, William P. Mack Jr.)
NEWS
By Michael R. Driscoll and Michael R. Driscoll,Staff Writer | June 19, 1992
The Napoleonic Wars and the Royal Navy had C.S. Forester. World War II and the U.S. Navy have Vice Adm. William P. Mack.The 76-year-old Mack, a former superintendent of the U.S Naval Academy, is the main author of a projected 10-volume fictional history of the American destroyers during the Second World War."It's a history of the feeling of sailors in World War II," Mack says. "The equipment and the facts are authentic. The only fiction is the characters."The first two books are "South to Java" (released in 1987 and written with his son, William P. Mack Jr.)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robert Lloyd and Tribune Newspapers | March 14, 2010
It was inevitable after the popular and critical success of their 2001 World War II miniseries "Band of Brothers," which told the story of the drive to conquer Hitler and Mussolini, that executive producers Tom Hanks and Steven Spielberg would return to finish the job. "The Pacific," which tells the story of the war against Japan, is here - it begins tonight on HBO - and is its forerunner's equal in emotive strength, weird poetry and technical bravura....
NEWS
By Myron Beckenstein | October 27, 1991
VISIONS OF INFAMY.William H. Honan.St. Martin's.346 pages. $22.95.THE GREAT PACIFIC WAR.Hector C. Bywater.St. Martin's.321 pages. $22.95.7/8 William Honan believes that the Japanese were entranced by Hector Bywater's 1925 book, "The Great Pacific War" -- so entranced that his book about it, "Visions of Infamy," is subtitled "The Untold Story of How Journalist Hector C. Bywater Devised the Plans that Led to Pearl Harbor." Well, maybe not quite Pearl Harbor, but close enough, he feels.Bywater was a naval scholar and journalist in an age in which the general public seems to have paid naval affairs much more attention than we do today.
NEWS
By ALBERT SEHLSTEDT, Jr | October 20, 1991
Hector Bywater was a British spy, a naval strategist, a correspondent for this newspaper in the 1920s, and the author of novel that described how Japanese warships would attack the United States in World War II.Bywater's prescience was neither coincidental nor Delphic: Rather, naval leaders in both countries read his novel, entitled "The Great Pacific War," and were so impressed by his specific proposals that they copied many of the tactics and strategies Bywater...
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