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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2014
For years, scientists have suspected that the warm waters of the western Pacific Ocean play a key role in shaping the Earth's climate. But satellite data provided only a partial picture of what's happening in this remote region of the globe. Now, an international team of researchers, including several from Maryland, is engaged in an ambitious effort to quantify those natural processes, making dozens of flights in three aircraft from mid-January through February to track the gases and particles from the ocean as they rise into the upper atmosphere.
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
The Navy identified the pilot Monday who went missing last week after a crash over the Pacific Ocean as Lt. Nathan Poloski, a 2009 graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy. Poloski, 26, of Lake Arrowhead, Calif., is presumed dead, officials said. "Nathan was an outstanding person, naval officer and aviator," Navy Cmdr. Michael Langbehn, the commanding officer of Poloski's squadron, said in a statement. "My personal thoughts and prayers are for his family, friends and shipmates as they endure this immeasurable loss.
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BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | November 3, 1999
A Maryland undersea exploration company and the NOVA television program hope to solve one of the great mysteries of the century by finding the plane in which Amelia Earhart vanished over the Pacific Ocean 63 years ago."We think we have a pretty high probability of success," said David Jourdan, founder and president of Nauticos Corp., which has a track record of locating difficult-to-find wrecks, such as the Dakar, the Israeli submarine that was lost 20 years ago in the Mediterranean. Earhart, a celebrated aviator and icon of the 1930s, and her navigator, Fred Noonan, disappeared July 2, 1937, while on an around-the-world flight.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | July 13, 2014
Just two pages into the book "Unbroken," its protagonist is in the water, hiding beneath the deteriorating life raft in which he has been drifting across the Pacific Ocean for almost a month. Overhead, Japanese bombers are circling back to strafe him a second time. And sharks are approaching from below. Death is coming for him from two directions, and your impulse is to verify that this is not a novel, not some outlandish fiction from the Indiana Jones School of Narrow Escapes.
NEWS
July 11, 1998
The increase in temperature of the Pacific Ocean during El Nino was misstated in yesterday's editions. The rise was about 9 degrees Fahrenheit.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 7/11/98
FEATURES
January 11, 2006
Jan. 11 1935: Amelia Earhart began a trip from Honolulu to Oakland that made her the first woman to fly solo across the Pacific Ocean. 1964: U.S. Surgeon General Luther Terry issued the first government report saying smoking may be hazardous to one's health.
NEWS
By Hearst Newspapers | April 20, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Improvements in the ability to predict Pacific Ocean water temperatures has lead to a "breakthrough" in weather forecasting, scientists from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) announced yesterday.The key is a large network of instruments providing better measurements of temperature and weather patterns in the Pacific, which in turn allow more realistic computer models of future water temperature variations.Scientists then use these models to forecast climate conditions around the globe.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN REPORTER | August 10, 2007
Hurricane forecasters at the federal Climate Prediction Center are sticking with their forecast of an unusually active 2007 Atlantic hurricane season. But their August update has trimmed the upper end of the predictions issued in May. The forecasters say water and atmospheric conditions in the Atlantic's main hurricane nurseries remain favorable for an above-normal season. The multidecadal conditions that have given rise to unusually active hurricane seasons since 1995 remain in place, they said.
TRAVEL
March 29, 2009
My husband, David, and I live in Baltimore and last September we traveled to Puerto Vallarta, Mexico. We rented a cabana overlooking the Pacific Ocean. We had lounge chairs inside and outside of the cabana. When I hung up my hat and lay back, I thought, "Wow what a great view," and took this picture. It was a wonderful vacation. The Baltimore Sun welcomes submissions for "My Best Shot." Photos should have been taken within the past year and be accompanied by a description of when and where you took the picture and your name, address and phone number.
NEWS
November 25, 1990
Mary Mark, a longtime resident of Bolton Hill, died Oct. 30 at Meridian Nursing Home in Hamilton after a brief illness. She was 86.Born on the Estonian island now known as Saaremaa, the former Marie Partel moved to the United States in the mid-1920s. She moved to Baltimore, where she worked in restaurants in the early 1940s.Mrs. Mark is survived by a son, Yono Mork of Oakland, Calif., and a sister, believed to be living in New Jersey. A resident of Eutaw Place for nearly 30 years, she was close friends there with Ted and Albine Hart.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2014
Meteorologists are growing increasingly confident that El Nino is brewing - but that doesn't mean they know what kind of weather it might bring Maryland. The climate phenomenon that brings unusually warm water to the Pacific Ocean off South America with weather repercussions that echo globally is showing signs it may develop later this year. Climatologists last week predicted greater than 65 percent odds El Nino will develop this summer, up to 80 percent by late fall. Some speculated it could be the strongest in years.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
El Niño has shown signs of further development since forecasters issued a watch for the global climate pattern a month ago. Observations of Pacific Ocean surface temperatures along the equator show warm water being pushed deeper, according to the Weather Underground's Jeff Masters . Forecasts for surface temperature anomalies have grown by half a degree over the past month when looking ahead to the summer and fall months. According to the National Centers for Environmental Prediction , ensemble models of Pacific Ocean temperatures show El Niño starting some time by June.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2014
The National Weather Service's Climate Prediction Center on Thursday placed the globe on El Niño watch, with a 50 percent chance of the global climate pattern developing by summer or fall. El Nino is characterized by above-average Pacific Ocean surface temperatures along the equator, just west of South America. It can cause climate patterns that contribute to extreme weather around the world, with some areas prone to drought or others to flooding, for example. In Maryland and the Northeast, El Niño is perhaps best known for bringing snowy winters -- though that's not required, as this snowy winter occurred under what are considered "neutral" conditions, with neither El Niño or La Niña present.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2014
For years, scientists have suspected that the warm waters of the western Pacific Ocean play a key role in shaping the Earth's climate. But satellite data provided only a partial picture of what's happening in this remote region of the globe. Now, an international team of researchers, including several from Maryland, is engaged in an ambitious effort to quantify those natural processes, making dozens of flights in three aircraft from mid-January through February to track the gases and particles from the ocean as they rise into the upper atmosphere.
TRAVEL
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2010
BIG ISLAND, HAWAII — The natives here have a charming custom that captures the bewildering geographic diversity on the Big Island, a 4,028-square-mile hunk of cooled lava in the middle of the Pacific Ocean. During the winters, residents make an excursion to the summit of Mauna Kea, which is nearly 14,000 feet above sea level. They fill a cooler with snow, and then drive about 90 minutes to the white sand beaches of the Kohala Coast, where the sun shines 357 days of the year and the average temperature is 78 degrees.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | October 18, 2009
Capt. George Jefferson Price, a retired Pan American World Airways pilot, adventurer and raconteur, packed a lot of living into a life that ended at 96 earlier this month, when he died at a Coral Gables, Fla., nursing home. Price's professional ties to Baltimore were through Pan Am, which he joined in 1942 aboard flying boats and later as a first officer aboard the famed M-130, better known to travelers as the China Clipper, that was built at the Glenn L. Martin Co. plant in Middle River.
NEWS
March 13, 1995
Navy Fireman Brian J. Carns, son of Robert and Deborah Carns of Westminster, is on a six-month deployment to the Western Pacific Ocean and Persian Gulf aboard the destroyer USS Cape Cod.The 1991 graduate of Westminster High School is among more than 1,800 sailors on the 645-foot repair ship, which departed from San Diego in October.Fireman Carns and his fellow crew members spent a month in Yokosuka, Japan, where they completed more than 2,000 repair jobs on Navy ships deployed to the Western Pacific Ocean.
TRAVEL
March 29, 2009
My husband, David, and I live in Baltimore and last September we traveled to Puerto Vallarta, Mexico. We rented a cabana overlooking the Pacific Ocean. We had lounge chairs inside and outside of the cabana. When I hung up my hat and lay back, I thought, "Wow what a great view," and took this picture. It was a wonderful vacation. The Baltimore Sun welcomes submissions for "My Best Shot." Photos should have been taken within the past year and be accompanied by a description of when and where you took the picture and your name, address and phone number.
TRAVEL
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,special to the sun | January 13, 2008
A wise traveler once said, half the fun is getting there. That's an understatement when it comes to motoring along the Pacific Coast Highway from San Francisco to Seattle. For my wife, Cathy, and me, the road -- unquestionably one of the most scenic byways in America -- wasn't just a means of getting from point A to point B. The road was our destination. I previously had made a similar journey in a '69 Cougar, and the scenic images have stuck in my mind for 35 years. I looked forward to sharing the ride with my wife; only this time, for part of our drive we would be using a different mode of transportation: motorcycles.
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