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By J.L. Conklin and J.L. Conklin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 17, 1996
It is no surprise that two ex-New York Ballet company members, Kent Stowell and Francia Russell, would generously pepper their own ballet company's repertoire with the works of George Balanchine.But it is interesting to note that their Pacific Northwest Ballet company, which opened a six-day run at the Kennedy Center on Tuesday night, looks so at home performing the dances of modern choreographers Mark Dendy and Nacho Duato.Lately, it seems as if Balanchine's works are the watermark for nearly every regional ballet company.
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By Stephanie Citron and For The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2014
A series of occasional articles exploring destinations that are easily reached via nonstop flights from Baltimore. Flying to the West Coast for vacation isn't often ideal for Baltimoreans. It can be difficult to find nonstop flights, and it's almost always a pricey venture. But that all changed this month when Alaska Airlines launched reasonably priced, nonstop service from BWI-Marshall to Seattle. Despite its rainy reputation, Seattle is an ideal destination during the months of September and October, when the summer crowds have dissipated and chances for sunshine remain high.
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FEATURES
By Peter D. Franklin and Peter D. Franklin,Contributing Writer | May 12, 1993
When is this going to stop?Once or twice a year we can expect a new, oversized and pricey volume in "The Beautiful Cookbook" series to hit the market. Collins Publishers of San Francisco (and a predecessor publisher) have nine such books, each filled with glorious color photographs, a creditable text and recipes that deserve a place in the kitchen.Now comes the 10th, and perhaps best, volume in the series: "Pacific Northwest The Beautiful Cookbook," by Kathy Casey and Lane Morgan (Collins, $45)
BUSINESS
By From Sun news services | February 3, 2009
Macy's Inc. announced yesterday that it will cut 7,000 jobs, almost 4 percent of its work force, and reduce its contributions to its employees' retirement funds and slash its dividend to preserve cash amid a severe pullback in consumer spending. The Cincinnati-based department store chain also announced the national rollout of a plan to localize merchandising to specific markets, which it began in some regions last year. The company, which also delivered downbeat earnings and sales forecasts for the year, said it plans to integrate all its geographic divisions into a single unit.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 24, 2000
PORTLAND, Ore. - With his environmentalist credentials, Al Gore might have expected to lock up the Pacific Northwest long ago. Instead, the vice president is battling George W. Bush for supremacy in the land of the spotted owl and the endangered salmon, which has emerged as one of the unlikeliest battlegrounds in the country this fall. "The race is dead even," Gore told several thousand supporters at a Portland rally Sunday night. "Oregon is dead even." Two weeks before Election Day, Gore is trailing Bush in some national polls and is in a statistical tie in others.
TRAVEL
By Gary Gately and By Gary Gately,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 22, 2000
It's about as subtle as Jimi Hendrix smashing a Fender Stratocaster guitar, this undulating mass of metallic blues and reds, purples and golds. F From the outside, Experience Music Project, Seattle's high-tech, $240 million tribute to American popular music, even looks like pieces of a smashed guitar all mashed together. Or maybe a hallucinogenic dream, a great blob of molten metal about to melt into the base of the Space Needle. Seattle's newest attraction combines the financial backing of Paul G. Allen -- Microsoft co-founder, guitarist and lifelong fan of native son Hendrix -- with the surreal brilliance of architect Frank Gehry and enough technological extravagance to make interactive exhibits elsewhere seem outmoded relics of the last century.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin | October 10, 2007
tastingmenu.com/allaboutapples If you're intrigued by the cooking of the Pacific Northwest and autumn has you in the mood for apples, you'll want to download this free online cookbook from the chef of Lampreia, a noted Seattle restaurant. The dishes feature many of the apple varieties grown in Washington.
NEWS
By [Michael Dresser] | April 18, 2007
From: Washington Price: $12 Serve with: Shellfish, Thai or Vietnamese cuisine This pioneering Washington state winery long has been known for its rieslings, but until this year its dry version of the famous German white varietal had been sold only in the Pacific Northwest. It's good to see it go national because it's a crisp, fruity version that is quite dry but not overly severe. There's plenty of complexity here - apple, peach, pear, spices, coconut and minerals - and stylishness, too, for the price.
BUSINESS
By SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER | December 31, 1996
Most people of a gambling nature wouldn't make a bet that required 40 years to learn if there's a payoff.Weyerhaeuser Co. did.In 1966, the company decided to convert its timberlands in the Pacific Northwest and the South to a then-untested concept known as "high-yield forestry." The idea was to manage trees much like an agricultural crop, and not to leave forests to nature and chance."Thirty years later, we're beginning to see these stands in their more mature form and what they're going to look like," said William Corbin, Weyerhaeuser's executive vice president for timberlands and distribution.
NEWS
By Newsday | August 12, 1993
Unusually cool temperatures in the Pacific Northwest, floods in the Midwest, drought in the East.What separates this year from others, meteorologists say, is unusual activity from the jet stream -- strong winds that sweep like a broad river across the country, mixing hot and cold air in the atmosphere.This year, though, the jet stream has swung farther south than usual and its winds are wringing moisture normally suspended over the Gulf of Mexico down onto the heads of Midwesterners.The jet stream normally shifts northward during the summer as the sun heats the northern hemisphere.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin | October 10, 2007
tastingmenu.com/allaboutapples If you're intrigued by the cooking of the Pacific Northwest and autumn has you in the mood for apples, you'll want to download this free online cookbook from the chef of Lampreia, a noted Seattle restaurant. The dishes feature many of the apple varieties grown in Washington.
NEWS
By [Michael Dresser] | April 18, 2007
From: Washington Price: $12 Serve with: Shellfish, Thai or Vietnamese cuisine This pioneering Washington state winery long has been known for its rieslings, but until this year its dry version of the famous German white varietal had been sold only in the Pacific Northwest. It's good to see it go national because it's a crisp, fruity version that is quite dry but not overly severe. There's plenty of complexity here - apple, peach, pear, spices, coconut and minerals - and stylishness, too, for the price.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 31, 2005
Entrepreneur Chad Stevens thinks he's found a way to help the well-heeled enjoy a footloose retirement. Stevens launched the Signature Destinations Club to give members access to luxury vacation homes around the world. "Many baby boomers won't be content to find that perfect retirement place and settle down for the rest of their lives - they'll want to be on the go," he said. The private residence club, which is based in Kirkland, Wash., is opening the first of nine regional hubs of homes in the Pacific Northwest in August.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | February 21, 2004
Landscape painting was the most important form of American art at the end of the 19th century. Artists used landscapes to express the young nation's democratic ideals of individualism, freedom and opportunity and as a metaphor for national pride. Among the artists carried westward with the country's geographical expansion was Grafton Tyler Brown, a Pennsylvania native who, in the 1880s and 1890s, became the first African-American artist to record the Pacific Northwest. Brown's spectacular landscapes of California, Oregon, Washington state and British Columbia are the subject of an exhibit opening today at the Walters Art Museum.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | August 8, 2002
On Sept. 11 the Federal Aviation Administration grounded all commercial aircraft in the United States after the terrorist attacks. For three days the skies were nearly as clear and quiet as they'd been since before the Wright Brothers skidded aloft. It was a difference not lost on David Travis. "I realized this was an opportunity to study what the U.S. used to be like before the aviation age began," says the University of Wisconsin atmospheric scientist. Specifically, he realized he had an unprecedented chance to answer a question that has vexed him and others for decades: Do the wispy tracings left behind by jets - known formally as contrails - somehow alter the environment?
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 24, 2000
PORTLAND, Ore. - With his environmentalist credentials, Al Gore might have expected to lock up the Pacific Northwest long ago. Instead, the vice president is battling George W. Bush for supremacy in the land of the spotted owl and the endangered salmon, which has emerged as one of the unlikeliest battlegrounds in the country this fall. "The race is dead even," Gore told several thousand supporters at a Portland rally Sunday night. "Oregon is dead even." Two weeks before Election Day, Gore is trailing Bush in some national polls and is in a statistical tie in others.
NEWS
October 20, 1997
Richard Mason,78, a British author best known for "The World of Suzie Wong," died of lung cancer Oct. 13 in Rome, where he had lived for nearly 40 years. His 1957 novel about a Hong Kong prostitute who falls in love with an artist became a Broadway play in 1958, and was turned into a film in 1960 starring William Holden and Nancy Kwan.Audra Lindley,79, who played Helen Roper on television's "Three's Company," died Thursday in Los Angeles of complications from leukemia. She had continued to work until one month ago, when she taped an episode of the CBS series "Cybill" in her recurring role as a mother to Cybill Shepherd's character.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | June 29, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court agreed yesterday to consider a plea to revive a congressional plan to save -- at the same time -- the northern spotted owl and the jobs of lumber workers in the Pacific Northwest.In a brief order issued before the justices began their summer recess, the court granted a hearing to the federal government on its anxious plea that a "timber crisis" was looming as a result of a lower federal court ruling.Last September, a federal appeals court ruled that Congress had acted unconstitutionally in 1989 when it enacted the "Northwest Timber Compromise" -- a multifaceted plan to control logging in the habitats of an endangered species, the northern spotted owl.Under the compromise, which was pressed by Pacific Northwest members of Congress, the government was given orders to sell specific amounts of timber from national forests and public lands, to keep the lumber industry in the area going.
TRAVEL
By Gary Gately and By Gary Gately,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 22, 2000
It's about as subtle as Jimi Hendrix smashing a Fender Stratocaster guitar, this undulating mass of metallic blues and reds, purples and golds. F From the outside, Experience Music Project, Seattle's high-tech, $240 million tribute to American popular music, even looks like pieces of a smashed guitar all mashed together. Or maybe a hallucinogenic dream, a great blob of molten metal about to melt into the base of the Space Needle. Seattle's newest attraction combines the financial backing of Paul G. Allen -- Microsoft co-founder, guitarist and lifelong fan of native son Hendrix -- with the surreal brilliance of architect Frank Gehry and enough technological extravagance to make interactive exhibits elsewhere seem outmoded relics of the last century.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | March 30, 2000
ZiPani, a Redmond, Wash.-based chain of bakery cafes, has closed more than half its stores in Maryland and Virginia. The stores, which sprouted from a group of Bruegger's Bagel Bakeries franchises, made their Maryland-Virginia debut in early 1998 with 23 locations. With the closing this week of the Dobbin Center store in Columbia and a Timonium location, the number is down to nine. Other than to confirm the number of current stores, company officials would not comment on the closings or indicate whether more were planned.
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