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NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,sun reporter | April 6, 2007
Dinner is about to be served in the kitchen in the William Paca House and Garden, apparently arrested in time. Set up as the busy workshop for the family's lavish dinner between 1 p.m. and 3 p.m., it is not cluttered with kitschy cheer. It now looks like a period Dutch artwork. The "clockjack" spit -- certainly a showpiece for the mistress of the house -- is no longer spinning on the hearth. Faux seabass are dressed on platters, a rabbit is stretched out ready for carving, a boar's head stares blankly at the mincemeat pies, peas, boiled onions and, yes, a pheasant, too. The newly created 18th-century still-life dinner scene is the central element of the transformation at the national historic landmark house in Annapolis, stressing authenticity, artisanship and domesticity in presenting the Pacas' lives as they were lived.
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NEWS
May 13, 2011
Concert series The Columbia Jazz Band opens the season for the William Paca Garden Concert Series at 6 p.m. on Thursday, May 19 at 186 Prince George St. in Annapolis. Concert-goers can take advantage of terrace seating or bring blankets and picnic on the Paca House lawn (no bottles or spirits). A cash bar will be available for snacks and beverages, ID required for all beer and wine purchases. Admission is $10, $12 at the door; $5 for children ages 5-15, free for children 5 and younger.
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NEWS
September 12, 2000
An exhibit of art by residents of the Paca House, a Baltimore residence for men who were once homeless, will be held from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. today at 116 N. Paca St. The show will include more than two dozen works of art in a variety of media, including oils, charcoal and watercolors. Paca House, a Volunteers of America facility, offers affordable housing for homeless people who need help with physical disabilities, mental illness and problems with drugs and alcohol.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2010
There was a time in his life — it turns out, most of his life — when Marco Alva felt like a man without a country. He had become separated by time and distance from Mexico and the culture of his native country, and, while he had married an American and started a family here, he was not yet a citizen of the United States. Sunday morning in Annapolis, the feeling of being adrift went away. On the Fourth of July, Marco Alva became an American. He and 36 other men and women took the oath of citizenship at the annual naturalization ceremony at the William Paca House, home of one of Maryland's signers of the Declaration of Independence.
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 26, 2002
If you take inspiration from a perfectly manicured lawn and garden, plan a visit to the William Paca House in the Annapolis Historic District. Briggs & Stratton, manufacturer of lawn mower engines, has named the property to its fifth annual list of the country's Top 10 Lawns. William Paca, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, developed the terraced gardens and used them for many grand parties. Now under the care of the Historic Annapolis Foundation and the State of Maryland, the grounds offer peaceful vistas and an opportunity to marvel at a reconstructed 18th-century garden featuring three terraces with a central walkway and turf alley.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | December 24, 1996
Lugging an armful of clothes, a few tattered boxes and a birthday balloon, Laurence Chapman walked through the red door of his new efficiency at Paca House, looked around and proclaimed it the best Christmas present he could ever hope for.Homeless for the past two years, Chapman was one of the first persons yesterday to move into Baltimore's long-awaited, multimillion-dollar residential project designed to permanently house the homeless, veterans and the...
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,Sun reporter | October 25, 2006
Alexandra Deutsch said her groom looked "hot" on their wedding day, a compliment unlikely to be heard in the halls of the William Paca House 250 years ago. At the historic Annapolis home Saturday, Kyle Cunningham indeed looked dashing as he dramatically appeared from behind the shrubbery and escorted her down the garden lane wearing a beaver felt hat, a sea-blue silk jacket and black breeches. While every bride plans her wedding day down to the last pin in her hair, Deutsch, the curator of the Paca House, reached back to its liveliest days to create her period wedding, with perfect attention to the dress, customs and manners of the day. But their union was infused with 21st-century touches.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,Sun reporter | April 6, 2007
Dinner is about to be served in the kitchen in the William Paca House and Garden, apparently arrested in time. Set up as the busy workshop for the family's lavish dinner between 1 p.m. and 3 p.m., it is not cluttered with kitschy cheer. It now looks like a period Dutch artwork. The "clockjack" spit - certainly a showpiece for the mistress of the house - is no longer spinning on the hearth. Faux sea bass are dressed on platters, a rabbit is stretched out ready for carving, a boar's head stares blankly at the mincemeat pies, peas, boiled onions and, yes, a pheasant, too. The new 18th-century still-life dinner scene is the central element of the transformation at the national historic landmark house in Annapolis, stressing authenticity, artisanship and domesticity in presenting the Pacas' lives as they were lived.
NEWS
December 24, 1996
THE FIRST residents of Paca House, Baltimore's newest single-room-occupancy building, are moving in just in time for Christmas. This is a cause of joy to nearly 100 other homeless men and women who eventually will live in the facility as well as to the homeless advocates who fought for more than five years to have the $8.6 million complex built in the 100 block of North Paca Street.Paca House consists of 76 SRO units and 30 efficiency apartments. Because it is almost directly across from the ailing Lexington Market, some area merchants are concerned.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Sun | December 2, 2007
Scotti Preston was a woman on a mission. Her job - to prepare a feast fit for royalty. She prepared bass, candied ginger, mincemeat pies, a boar's head, oysters, pheasant, fresh churned butter and bread. "This is the type of meal that the wealthy people who lived during the 18th and 19th centuries would have eaten," Preston said as she chipped chunks off of what looked like a mound of sugar. Although the food she prepared was artificial, Preston plans to use the dishes as props to portray a character named Cook.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | February 13, 2010
At the Paca House in Annapolis, scene of dozens of weddings each year, chief horticulturist Mollie Ridout is sighing with relief: The hemlock hedges that line the bride's walk down the aisle look like they survived. But at Baltimore's Cylburn Arboretum, some of the 100-year-old boxwoods might not have. The heavy snow splayed open the upright hedges as if they were roses past their prime. Homeowners all over Maryland are assessing the damage to their trees, shrubs and gardens from nature's one-two punch this week.
NEWS
By Susan Gvozdas and Susan Gvozdas,Special to The Sun | April 2, 2008
At a time when video gamers can simulate a tennis swing by waving a remote control, it might be hard to appreciate the attraction of the "perspective glass" on display at the William Paca House in Annapolis. The zograscope was a luxury that only the wealthy could afford to have at home in the late 1770s. For fun, colonists could place an engraved picture upside down on a table, then look at its reflected image in a mirror suspended over it on a wooden stand. Through the zograscope, the image appeared right side up and three-dimensional -- an optical illusion that proved to be a nifty parlor trick.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Sun | December 2, 2007
Scotti Preston was a woman on a mission. Her job - to prepare a feast fit for royalty. She prepared bass, candied ginger, mincemeat pies, a boar's head, oysters, pheasant, fresh churned butter and bread. "This is the type of meal that the wealthy people who lived during the 18th and 19th centuries would have eaten," Preston said as she chipped chunks off of what looked like a mound of sugar. Although the food she prepared was artificial, Preston plans to use the dishes as props to portray a character named Cook.
NEWS
July 1, 2007
Annapolis was bursting with centennial celebrations as it hosted a 100-year birthday party for the nation, The Sun reported on July 5, 1876. The pomp and circumstance began at midnight on the Fourth of July with "the booming of cannon and the spat of small arms," which lasted until sunrise, and ended with a gun salute at the Naval Academy and chimes from church bells throughout the city. At 10 p.m. a procession of former soldiers firing horse pistols marched to the State House, where they gathered for a meeting that included speeches, prayers and a recitation of John Greenleaf Whittier's centennial hymn.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 13, 2007
Annapolis tourists exploring the museums and historic sites are bound to get hungry. Fortunately, Annapolis is home to dozens of great lunch spots, from casual delis in the heart of town to elegant dining establishments along the water's edge. For history-lovers who have spent the morning exploring centuries-old mansions such as the William Paca House & Gardens (186 Prince George St., 410-990-4538) or visiting museums such as the Banneker-Douglass Museum (84 Franklin St., 410-514-7618)
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,Sun reporter | April 6, 2007
Dinner is about to be served in the kitchen in the William Paca House and Garden, apparently arrested in time. Set up as the busy workshop for the family's lavish dinner between 1 p.m. and 3 p.m., it is not cluttered with kitschy cheer. It now looks like a period Dutch artwork. The "clockjack" spit - certainly a showpiece for the mistress of the house - is no longer spinning on the hearth. Faux sea bass are dressed on platters, a rabbit is stretched out ready for carving, a boar's head stares blankly at the mincemeat pies, peas, boiled onions and, yes, a pheasant, too. The new 18th-century still-life dinner scene is the central element of the transformation at the national historic landmark house in Annapolis, stressing authenticity, artisanship and domesticity in presenting the Pacas' lives as they were lived.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | August 19, 2005
A late 18th-century garden was not just a beautiful thing. In those times, the flora around a house was as useful as it was attractive - perhaps more so. At the William Paca House and Garden in Annapolis, a free public talk slated for tomorrow morning will show how heavily a Colonial household relied on its garden - not only for gooseberries, apples and other fruits and vegetables, but for herbs and medicinal remedies. Sassafras and echinacea were big back then as remedies on both sides of the Atlantic, as a stroll through a replanted period garden behind the Paca House shows.
NEWS
By Amy P. Ingram and Amy P. Ingram,Contributing Writer | November 3, 1993
It was only two years ago that the rooms William Paca used as law offices during Colonial days stood empty in the 200-year-old restored mansion where he once lived on Prince George Street in Annapolis.But that was before Rose Marie Siriano came along and turned it into a gift shop filled with replicas of antiques, wooden hoops and tops, collector sets and jewelry worth thousands of dollars.Now, it brings in most of the revenue needed to keep open the house of the former governor, who was a signer of the Declaration of Independence.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,sun reporter | April 6, 2007
Dinner is about to be served in the kitchen in the William Paca House and Garden, apparently arrested in time. Set up as the busy workshop for the family's lavish dinner between 1 p.m. and 3 p.m., it is not cluttered with kitschy cheer. It now looks like a period Dutch artwork. The "clockjack" spit -- certainly a showpiece for the mistress of the house -- is no longer spinning on the hearth. Faux seabass are dressed on platters, a rabbit is stretched out ready for carving, a boar's head stares blankly at the mincemeat pies, peas, boiled onions and, yes, a pheasant, too. The newly created 18th-century still-life dinner scene is the central element of the transformation at the national historic landmark house in Annapolis, stressing authenticity, artisanship and domesticity in presenting the Pacas' lives as they were lived.
ENTERTAINMENT
By [GENA CHATTIN] | March 22, 2007
'UNPREDICTABLE' JAMIE FOXX Multitalented Jamie Foxx has earned almost every accolade available to a modern performer. He's been loved as a comedian, honored as an actor and praised as a vocalist. The Oscar winner and Grammy nominee combines his many talents for a music and comedy show Sunday at 1st Mariner Arena. Foxx's Baltimore show is one stop on his 30-city "Unpredictable" tour. Fresh from an acting role in the critically acclaimed Dreamgirls, Foxx has put together a combination of songs from his hit album Unpredictable and the comedy talents that lifted him to stardom.
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