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By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff writer | March 20, 1991
In a competitive Carroll state Senate campaign last fall, Democrat Jeff Griffith benefited from his relationship with the governor to collect $7,500 in contributions.Republican challenger Larry E. Haines profited from his business background to garner $6,300 from the Maryland Realtors Political Action Committee.Both of those hefty contributions would have been outlawed under campaign finance reform legislation that passed the House Monday night.The bill, sponsored by House Speaker R. Clayton Mitchell, D-Kent, and about half the 141 delegates -- including Delegates Richard N.Dixon, D-Carroll, and Donald B. Elliott, R-Carroll, Howard -- sets a$4,000 limit on the amount the treasurer of a candidate or PAC can contribute to a campaign during a four-year election cycle.
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NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,paul.west@baltsun.com | July 17, 2009
Harvesting the rewards of incumbency, freshman Democratic Rep. Frank Kratovil has expanded his financial edge over potential 2010 Republican challenger Andy Harris, according to new campaign finance reports. Their latest Federal Election Commission filings show Kratovil outraising Harris by a nearly 2-to-1 margin.The contest for Maryland's 1st Congressional District, which includes the Eastern Shore and parts of Baltimore, Anne Arundel and Harford counties, is one of the most closely watched in the nation.
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NEWS
February 1, 1991
"The time has come to put the national interest above the special interest and to totally eliminate political action committees."-- President George Bush in the State of the Union address."Last year the Senate passed a good bill to . . . eliminate political action committees. We're going to pass it again this year and push until it becomes law." -- Senate Majority Leader George Mitchell in the Democratic reply to the State of the Union.It is probably impossible to legally end political action committees (PACs)
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | June 12, 1998
Democratic gubernatorial candidate Raymond F. Schoenke Jr., who is paying for his campaign largely with his personal fortune, declared yesterday he would accept no money from "special interest" political action committees in general and the gambling industry specifically.Calling on his opponents to do the same, Schoenke said the move was necessary to assure the public that he would not be beholden to such interest groups."We have to make a statement that we will return the government back to the people," Schoenke said during a news conference in downtown Baltimore.
NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Evening Sun Staff | September 25, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Fearing ill effects from congressional redistricting, Rep. Tom McMillen of Maryland is asking supporters to contribute up to $1,000 today to his re-election fund."
NEWS
February 4, 1991
During the 1990 election, political action committees in Maryland contributed $3 million to candidates; $2.4 million of that to incumbents. Among the top recipients were Governor Schaefer, who received $309,863 ($45,700 from the state's builders and contractors alone) and Senate President Mike Miller, who collected $100,773. Sen. Frank Komenda was third, with $61,100. And so on. Suffice it to say PACs are strong and growing; last year's contributions were up 71 percent from four years ago.While these gifts don't buy votes outright, at the very least they buy access and influence, which erodes the democratic process.
NEWS
By Myriam Marquez | September 22, 1994
CRIME AND health-care reform are the two issues that voters most care about. But in Washington, it's the money of special interests that seems to matter most to members of Congress.Will it be the same old, same old deadlock?Or, as the government watchdog group Public Citizen calls it, "greedlock"?Public Citizen coined the term "greedlock" in a recent press release urging Congress to act on campaign-finance reform. They got that right.The fact that campaign-finance reform bills approved by both houses several months ago have been placed on hold by the Democratic leadership in the House explains why other major issues -- such as health-care reform -- have stalled, too.Follow the special-interest money, and it may just lead you to an incumbent's vote for something that a political action committee would like done -- or not done.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | January 30, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- Big money continued to flash its political power in Maryland over the last four years as PACs pumped money into the hands of incumbent lawmakers at a pace 71 percent higher than four years ago, according to a report released yesterday by Maryland Common Cause.Overall, Maryland's 250 political action committees contributed $3 million to General Assembly candidates during the 1990 election, with incumbents receiving $2.4 million of the total.The money always comes with strings attached, according to Phil Andrews, executive director of Common Cause in Maryland.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Evening Sun Staff | March 19, 1991
The House of Delegates has approved two unprecedented measures that would restrict the influence political action committees and lobbyists have on state elections.By a vote of 133-1, the House passed a bill yesterday that would set a $4,000 cap on the amount a PAC can give to a candidate during a four-year election cycle. Under current law, there are no caps on how much a PAC can donate to a candidate's election fund.The bill also would increase from $2,000 to $5,000 the amount an individual can give to a campaign.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Washington Bureau | April 26, 1992
WASHINGTON -- In this most turbulent of political years, special interest groups are putting their big-money support on hold.A record number of House retirements, the uncertainties of congressional redistricting and the House bank scandal all are converging to make 1992 one of the most volatile political years in memory.As a result, many political action committees are reluctant to sign that check until the political fog lifts, or the voters speak."We've been advising them to do this," said Bernadette Budde, vice president of Business Industry-PAC.
NEWS
By Myriam Marquez | September 22, 1994
CRIME AND health-care reform are the two issues that voters most care about. But in Washington, it's the money of special interests that seems to matter most to members of Congress.Will it be the same old, same old deadlock?Or, as the government watchdog group Public Citizen calls it, "greedlock"?Public Citizen coined the term "greedlock" in a recent press release urging Congress to act on campaign-finance reform. They got that right.The fact that campaign-finance reform bills approved by both houses several months ago have been placed on hold by the Democratic leadership in the House explains why other major issues -- such as health-care reform -- have stalled, too.Follow the special-interest money, and it may just lead you to an incumbent's vote for something that a political action committee would like done -- or not done.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Washington Bureau | April 26, 1992
WASHINGTON -- In this most turbulent of political years, special interest groups are putting their big-money support on hold.A record number of House retirements, the uncertainties of congressional redistricting and the House bank scandal all are converging to make 1992 one of the most volatile political years in memory.As a result, many political action committees are reluctant to sign that check until the political fog lifts, or the voters speak."We've been advising them to do this," said Bernadette Budde, vice president of Business Industry-PAC.
NEWS
By BRIAN SULLAM and BRIAN SULLAM,Brian Sullam is a reporter for The Sun | December 22, 1991
Among the six Democrats vying for the party's presidential nomination who debated last Sunday, the issue that created the most contention was not health care, economics, foreign relations or even trade. It was campaign contributions.Jerry Brown, the former governor of California, created a stir when he implied that his opponents were bought and paid for by special interest groups. Mr. Brown focused his comments on contributions made by Political Action Committees, better known PACs, pointing out that General Electric, the parent company NBC Television which was broadcasting the debate, gave $350,000 in PAC contributions to federal elected officials.
NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Evening Sun Staff | September 25, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Fearing ill effects from congressional redistricting, Rep. Tom McMillen of Maryland is asking supporters to contribute up to $1,000 today to his re-election fund."
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff writer | March 20, 1991
In a competitive Carroll state Senate campaign last fall, Democrat Jeff Griffith benefited from his relationship with the governor to collect $7,500 in contributions.Republican challenger Larry E. Haines profited from his business background to garner $6,300 from the Maryland Realtors Political Action Committee.Both of those hefty contributions would have been outlawed under campaign finance reform legislation that passed the House Monday night.The bill, sponsored by House Speaker R. Clayton Mitchell, D-Kent, and about half the 141 delegates -- including Delegates Richard N.Dixon, D-Carroll, and Donald B. Elliott, R-Carroll, Howard -- sets a$4,000 limit on the amount the treasurer of a candidate or PAC can contribute to a campaign during a four-year election cycle.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Evening Sun Staff | March 19, 1991
The House of Delegates has approved two unprecedented measures that would restrict the influence political action committees and lobbyists have on state elections.By a vote of 133-1, the House passed a bill yesterday that would set a $4,000 cap on the amount a PAC can give to a candidate during a four-year election cycle. Under current law, there are no caps on how much a PAC can donate to a candidate's election fund.The bill also would increase from $2,000 to $5,000 the amount an individual can give to a campaign.
NEWS
By BRIAN SULLAM and BRIAN SULLAM,Brian Sullam is a reporter for The Sun | December 22, 1991
Among the six Democrats vying for the party's presidential nomination who debated last Sunday, the issue that created the most contention was not health care, economics, foreign relations or even trade. It was campaign contributions.Jerry Brown, the former governor of California, created a stir when he implied that his opponents were bought and paid for by special interest groups. Mr. Brown focused his comments on contributions made by Political Action Committees, better known PACs, pointing out that General Electric, the parent company NBC Television which was broadcasting the debate, gave $350,000 in PAC contributions to federal elected officials.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Staff writer | October 31, 1990
Four years have passed, but the District 14 Senate race is a rerun.Once again, Republican Chris McCabe is challenging Democrat Edward J.Kasemeyer for the Senate seat he holds in the district that includes Ellicott City, west Columbia, Clarksville, West Friendship and a portion of Montgomery County.As in 1986, McCabe has spoken against what he sees as the growing power of lobbyists and special-interest groups on the legislative process, attacking Kasemeyer for accepting campaign contributions from political action committees.
NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Evening Sun Staff | February 18, 1991
WASHINGTON -- In politics, everybody loves a winner, as U.S. Rep. Wayne T. Gilchrest of Maryland is learning.Gilchrest, R-1st, has collected more than $9,000 in contributions since defeating incumbent Democrat Roy P. Dyson on Nov. 6. Dyson, once a contributors' favorite, received just $1,805, according to his latest federal finance report.It's not surprising that people and PACs -- political action committees, set up by special interest groups -- contribute right after an election.PACs hope to influence politicians, who in turn like to build up campaign war chests well ahead of the next election, the better to discourage opponents.
NEWS
February 4, 1991
During the 1990 election, political action committees in Maryland contributed $3 million to candidates; $2.4 million of that to incumbents. Among the top recipients were Governor Schaefer, who received $309,863 ($45,700 from the state's builders and contractors alone) and Senate President Mike Miller, who collected $100,773. Sen. Frank Komenda was third, with $61,100. And so on. Suffice it to say PACs are strong and growing; last year's contributions were up 71 percent from four years ago.While these gifts don't buy votes outright, at the very least they buy access and influence, which erodes the democratic process.
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