Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPablo Picasso
IN THE NEWS

Pablo Picasso

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
October 24, 1997
In "Surviving Picasso" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., Cinemax), Director James Ivory, co-producer Ismail Merchant and screenwriter Ruth Prawer Jhabvala ("A Room With a View," "Howards End") turn the life of Pablo Picasso into a conventional biography.The 1996 film splits its attention between the Spanish painter (Anthony Hopkins) and Francoise Gilot (Natascha McElhone), the woman who was his companion between 1943 and 1953 in Paris. Julianne Moore and Susannah Harker portray two of the artist's mistresses.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | February 5, 2004
Amazingly, only a few decades ago the jury was still out on Picasso, with some critics, journalists and historians still expressing skepticism over whether the modernist revolution he helped usher in would truly prove a lasting contribution to the world's cultural heritage. Today there seems absolutely no doubt about the magnitude or permanence of Picasso's achievement. Picasso is universally acknowledged as one of the great figures in the history of European art. As a result, these days any exhibition of the master's work is a significant event, and the modestly scaled show Pablo Picasso: Surrealism and the War Years 1926-1946, now on view in the Cone Focus Gallery at the Baltimore Museum of Art, is no exception.
Advertisement
NEWS
July 26, 1997
Dora Maar,89, the dark-haired mistress and muse of Pablo Picasso who plunged into a long-term depression when the painter ended their relationship, died July 16 and was buried yesterday in Clamart, a small town south of Paris.A painter and a photographer, Maar struggled to break free from Picasso's powerful personality and develop her own artistic ambitions, but failed, spending much of her adult life as a recluse. During her eight years with Picasso in the 1930s and 1940s, she was the subject of several portraits, including "Bust of a Seated Woman," which sold at auction in 1995 for $3 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer and Sarah Schaffer,SUN STAFF | October 2, 2003
Tribute to husband Michelle Sanzi Kermes pays tribute to her late husband in For the Love of Wiley, on display today through Oct. 26 at the Resurgam Gallery. The former cartographer layers painting over randomly placed collage items in pieces that are abstract and simple. But the seemingly freeflow art isn't quick or chaotic. Rather, the works speak to the calm emotions and meditative spirit from which Kermes drew while caring for her ailing partner last summer. A reception for For the Love of Wiley will take place from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Oct. 11. The Resurgam Gallery is at 910 S. Charles St. For more information, call 410-962-0513.
FEATURES
By Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen and Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen,Contributing Writers Solis-Cohen Enterprises | November 7, 1993
Q: When my husband sold his business, he brought home an old nickel-plated hotel cash register, model 442-E, by National Cash Register Co., of Dayton, Ohio. Although designed to operate electrically, it now works only by a hand crank. Among its keys are ones marked for cigars, rooms and wine. The last patent date on it is 1912. Is it rare and collectible?Q: Your circa 1913 cash register is a common one, worth around $200 to $300 in its present condition, according to collector Hayne Dominick, 562 Gammon Road, Colonial Heights, Tenn.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | September 17, 1998
Photographer Yousuf Karsh, now almost 90, has been one of the most successful portrait photographers in history. His subjects include presidents Dwight D. Eisenhower and John F. Kennedy, first lady Jacqueline Kennedy, the present British queen when she was Princess Elizabeth, artists Alexander Calder and Pablo Picasso, movie stars Laurence Olivier and Clark Gable, scientist Albert Einstein, Pope John Paul II and writers Robert Frost and Ernest Hemingway....
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | August 28, 1999
150 years ago in The SunAugust 28, 1849: The Baltimore and Susquehanna Railroad --The amount of business now doing on this road, far exceeds, both in passenger and tonnage accounts, that of former years. The stock of the company has been increased, and when the connecting railroad with Harrisburg shall have been finished, which will be in a short time, the present revenue of the road will be more than doubled.100 years ago in The SunAugust 30, 1899: The Water Department will take immediate steps to have water meters placed in every building in Baltimore County using city water.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Daily News | November 28, 1990
Gems like this you've never seen, not even in dreams.For her 10th anniversary as a jewelry designer with Tiffany and Co., Paloma Picasso has introduced 10 special suites of jewelry that showcase her talent for simple yet stunning jewelry.The simple part comes from the use of her signature "X" as a design element. The stunning part comes from the size of the gems selected for some of the pieces.Imagine wearing a 715-carat kunzite, a light pink stone named for George Frederick Kunz, a Tiffany executive and gemologist.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | April 12, 1998
Steve Martin's hit play, "Picasso at the Lapin Agile," is about a fictitious meeting between Albert Einstein and Pablo Picasso in 1904. The two did not actually meet then, or possibly ever, but the play does contain some factual elements.There is a bar in the Montmartre section of Paris called the Lapin Agile. It is located at 22 Rue des Saules. In 1875, an artist named Andre Gill painted the sign responsible for the bar's name. A painting of a rabbit jumping into a pot, it was initially referred to as "Le Lapin a Gill," which then evolved into "Lapin Agile" (literal translation: "nimble rabbit")
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer and Sarah Schaffer,SUN STAFF | October 2, 2003
Tribute to husband Michelle Sanzi Kermes pays tribute to her late husband in For the Love of Wiley, on display today through Oct. 26 at the Resurgam Gallery. The former cartographer layers painting over randomly placed collage items in pieces that are abstract and simple. But the seemingly freeflow art isn't quick or chaotic. Rather, the works speak to the calm emotions and meditative spirit from which Kermes drew while caring for her ailing partner last summer. A reception for For the Love of Wiley will take place from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Oct. 11. The Resurgam Gallery is at 910 S. Charles St. For more information, call 410-962-0513.
NEWS
By William Hyder and William Hyder,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 1, 2003
Did you know that Albert Einstein ran into Pablo Picasso in a bistro in Paris in 1904? And that they had a long conversation about life and love, talent and genius with the other patrons and the couple who owned the bar? Hard to imagine? Steve Martin could and did imagine it, in a funny and intelligent play called Picasso at the Lapin Agile. A Student-Alumni Arts production of the comedian's one-acter - it runs about 90 minutes - is being performed through May 11 in Howard Community College's Theatre Outback.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | December 16, 2001
I find it impossible to decide whether John Richardson is the 20th century's most scholarly gossip or its most gossipy scholar. But this much is certain: He is one of the world's most urbane, articulate, expressive and convivial people. He may have known more modern and contemporary artists, critics, curators and collectors than anyone else alive. Now comes his latest book: Sacred Monsters, Sacred Masters: Beaton, Capote, Dali, Picasso, Freud, Warhol and More (Random House, 363 pages, $27.95)
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | August 22, 2001
Pablo Picasso was one of the greatest draftsmen of the 20th century, an artist whose instantly recognizable graphic style was familiar even to people who knew little about art. By the time he died, his revolutionary sense of design had so pervaded popular consciousness that knockoffs of his works adorned everything from book and jazz album covers to calendars and greeting cards. But Picasso (1881-1973) did not develop his unique manner all at once. Though he was a child prodigy whose talent was recognized early by his father, a provincial art teacher and painter, Picasso's earliest works reflected the traditional stylistic conventions of 19th-century academic art. Only after 1900, when he first settled in Paris as a penniless, struggling artist, did his highly personal style began to emerge.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 9, 2000
There wasn't much in the artistic realm that Pablo Picasso couldn't do. His "Rose" and "Blue" periods heralded the birth of a new century of painting, and his rebellion against Impressionism would define the essence of modernism. But his talent and vision made him a man of all genres. Picasso was an extraordinary sculptor, one of the first to assemble his forms from a diverse set of materials, rather than model or carve his images in the traditional manner. Picasso also was a virtuoso in the graphic arts, as his etchings and lithographs attest.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | August 28, 1999
150 years ago in The SunAugust 28, 1849: The Baltimore and Susquehanna Railroad --The amount of business now doing on this road, far exceeds, both in passenger and tonnage accounts, that of former years. The stock of the company has been increased, and when the connecting railroad with Harrisburg shall have been finished, which will be in a short time, the present revenue of the road will be more than doubled.100 years ago in The SunAugust 30, 1899: The Water Department will take immediate steps to have water meters placed in every building in Baltimore County using city water.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | September 17, 1998
Photographer Yousuf Karsh, now almost 90, has been one of the most successful portrait photographers in history. His subjects include presidents Dwight D. Eisenhower and John F. Kennedy, first lady Jacqueline Kennedy, the present British queen when she was Princess Elizabeth, artists Alexander Calder and Pablo Picasso, movie stars Laurence Olivier and Clark Gable, scientist Albert Einstein, Pope John Paul II and writers Robert Frost and Ernest Hemingway....
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 9, 2000
There wasn't much in the artistic realm that Pablo Picasso couldn't do. His "Rose" and "Blue" periods heralded the birth of a new century of painting, and his rebellion against Impressionism would define the essence of modernism. But his talent and vision made him a man of all genres. Picasso was an extraordinary sculptor, one of the first to assemble his forms from a diverse set of materials, rather than model or carve his images in the traditional manner. Picasso also was a virtuoso in the graphic arts, as his etchings and lithographs attest.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | December 16, 2001
I find it impossible to decide whether John Richardson is the 20th century's most scholarly gossip or its most gossipy scholar. But this much is certain: He is one of the world's most urbane, articulate, expressive and convivial people. He may have known more modern and contemporary artists, critics, curators and collectors than anyone else alive. Now comes his latest book: Sacred Monsters, Sacred Masters: Beaton, Capote, Dali, Picasso, Freud, Warhol and More (Random House, 363 pages, $27.95)
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | April 12, 1998
Steve Martin's hit play, "Picasso at the Lapin Agile," is about a fictitious meeting between Albert Einstein and Pablo Picasso in 1904. The two did not actually meet then, or possibly ever, but the play does contain some factual elements.There is a bar in the Montmartre section of Paris called the Lapin Agile. It is located at 22 Rue des Saules. In 1875, an artist named Andre Gill painted the sign responsible for the bar's name. A painting of a rabbit jumping into a pot, it was initially referred to as "Le Lapin a Gill," which then evolved into "Lapin Agile" (literal translation: "nimble rabbit")
FEATURES
October 24, 1997
In "Surviving Picasso" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., Cinemax), Director James Ivory, co-producer Ismail Merchant and screenwriter Ruth Prawer Jhabvala ("A Room With a View," "Howards End") turn the life of Pablo Picasso into a conventional biography.The 1996 film splits its attention between the Spanish painter (Anthony Hopkins) and Francoise Gilot (Natascha McElhone), the woman who was his companion between 1943 and 1953 in Paris. Julianne Moore and Susannah Harker portray two of the artist's mistresses.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.