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By Art Buchwald | December 10, 1993
WE ARE here to say goodbye to Pablo Escobar, otherwise known to those who loved him as "El Snow White."He lived a short but fruitful life distributing joy and cheer wherever he went. Just after his 44th birthday he was gunned down by vicious, cruel Colombian troops who were jealous of his looks and power.El Snow White was a good man, and because of that he had his detractors. Many people said that he was a murderer, an assassin, an arsonist, a smuggler and the person responsible for blowing up a Colombian airline with 107 people on board.
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NEWS
By Art Buchwald | December 10, 1993
WE ARE here to say goodbye to Pablo Escobar, otherwise known to those who loved him as "El Snow White."He lived a short but fruitful life distributing joy and cheer wherever he went. Just after his 44th birthday he was gunned down by vicious, cruel Colombian troops who were jealous of his looks and power.El Snow White was a good man, and because of that he had his detractors. Many people said that he was a murderer, an assassin, an arsonist, a smuggler and the person responsible for blowing up a Colombian airline with 107 people on board.
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NEWS
By DAN BERGER | December 6, 1993
Pablo Escobar is dead. His work lives on.Build it and they will come? In art, it's build a stadium and spectators will come. In life, it's buy the tickets and a team may come.Now the FBI is going after NASA. In bad times, the government devours itself.Don't look now but the national economic recovery seems to have started. When it will reach Maryland is another story.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | December 6, 1993
Pablo Escobar is dead. His work lives on.Build it and they will come? In art, it's build a stadium and spectators will come. In life, it's buy the tickets and a team may come.Now the FBI is going after NASA. In bad times, the government devours itself.Don't look now but the national economic recovery seems to have started. When it will reach Maryland is another story.
NEWS
By Ana Arana and Ana Arana,Special to The Sun | May 26, 1991
BOGOTA, Colombia -- Drug lord Pablo Escobar is slowly gaining a measure of respectability in Colombia as a surprising turn of events has brought the country's most notorious drug trafficker to the verge of surrendering.Only a few days after releasing Maruja Pachon and Francisco Santos, two well-known journalists he held captive for several months, Mr. Escobar was described by the Rev. Rafael Garcia-Herreros, who mediated the release, as "a man who keeps his word," a "good man."The priest said he met with Mr. Escobar twice this month, and he reported that Mr. Escobar said he would surrender the first week of June.
NEWS
December 4, 1993
Colombian cocaine king Pablo Escobar died as he lived, in a hail of gun fire as presidents rejoiced and the poor people ofMedellin mourned the murderous thug who used some of his drug millions to play the role of a peasant Robin Hood.It is the stuff of fiction but also the real-life story of a vicious criminal who killed hundreds of people, maimed thousands more through drug addiction, amassed a multi-billion-dollar fortune, defied U.S. authorities and shook Colombian society and its government to its foundations.
NEWS
June 22, 1991
Most people know that cocaine retards the brain. What scholars at Colombia's Fedesarollo economic research organization say is that it also badly retards the economy in the country where cocaine is thought to be king. That's something to remember as it sinks in that Pablo Escobar, head of the Medellin cocaine cartel and one of the world's most brutal drug runners, is ensconced in a specially built prison from which he will continue to operate his drug ring.Here's what the economic researchers mean:Drug profits, which have made thugs like Escobar rich, are regularly repatriated as contraband consumer goods.
NEWS
By Ana Arana and Ana Arana,Special to The Sun | January 6, 1991
MEDELLIN, Colombia -- For most of his 21 years, Juan Martinez was what you would call mean.At 14, when most children are still playing games, Juan Martinez (not his real name) started transporting drugs, robbing people at gunpoint and getting into shootouts with the police.His hero was drug lord Pablo Escobar -- another poor boy who did well illegally but did not forget his old neighborhood."Pablo sent food to the poor people in the neighborhoods. He is good to us," Mr. Martinez said shyly.
NEWS
By SCOTT SHANE AND TOM BOWMAN and SCOTT SHANE AND TOM BOWMAN,SUN STAFF | December 3, 1995
After posing for photos, Chinese diplomats led guests through their new, $13 million embassy in Canberra, Australia, a dramatic pagoda-style building with a swimming pool, tennis courts, greenhouse and sweeping lake views.But the grand opening in August 1990 would have been ruined had the diplomats known everything about their elegant chancery.Thirty U.S. agents had worked for months to lace the concrete and drywall of every office with fiber-optic listening devices, their fine, glass threads undetectable in security sweeps.
NEWS
May 23, 1997
Virgilio Barco, 75, who led Colombia through one of its most difficult periods of drug violence as president from 1986 to 1990, extraditing top traffickers to the United States, died Tuesday. He suffered from Alzheimer's disease. During his presidency, he authorized the extradition of leading drug traffickers, unleashing a war of terror by drug lord Pablo Escobar.Dorothy Olding, 87, a literary agent for J. D. Salinger and a guardian of his privacy, died May 14 in New York. She also represented Pearl S. Buck, Paul Gallico, Ngaio Marsh during a 52-year career with the Harold Ober Associates literary agency in New York.
NEWS
December 4, 1993
Colombian cocaine king Pablo Escobar died as he lived, in a hail of gun fire as presidents rejoiced and the poor people ofMedellin mourned the murderous thug who used some of his drug millions to play the role of a peasant Robin Hood.It is the stuff of fiction but also the real-life story of a vicious criminal who killed hundreds of people, maimed thousands more through drug addiction, amassed a multi-billion-dollar fortune, defied U.S. authorities and shook Colombian society and its government to its foundations.
NEWS
June 22, 1991
Most people know that cocaine retards the brain. What scholars at Colombia's Fedesarollo economic research organization say is that it also badly retards the economy in the country where cocaine is thought to be king. That's something to remember as it sinks in that Pablo Escobar, head of the Medellin cocaine cartel and one of the world's most brutal drug runners, is ensconced in a specially built prison from which he will continue to operate his drug ring.Here's what the economic researchers mean:Drug profits, which have made thugs like Escobar rich, are regularly repatriated as contraband consumer goods.
NEWS
By Ana Arana and Ana Arana,Special to The Sun | May 26, 1991
BOGOTA, Colombia -- Drug lord Pablo Escobar is slowly gaining a measure of respectability in Colombia as a surprising turn of events has brought the country's most notorious drug trafficker to the verge of surrendering.Only a few days after releasing Maruja Pachon and Francisco Santos, two well-known journalists he held captive for several months, Mr. Escobar was described by the Rev. Rafael Garcia-Herreros, who mediated the release, as "a man who keeps his word," a "good man."The priest said he met with Mr. Escobar twice this month, and he reported that Mr. Escobar said he would surrender the first week of June.
NEWS
By Ana Arana and Ana Arana,Special to The Sun | January 6, 1991
MEDELLIN, Colombia -- For most of his 21 years, Juan Martinez was what you would call mean.At 14, when most children are still playing games, Juan Martinez (not his real name) started transporting drugs, robbing people at gunpoint and getting into shootouts with the police.His hero was drug lord Pablo Escobar -- another poor boy who did well illegally but did not forget his old neighborhood."Pablo sent food to the poor people in the neighborhoods. He is good to us," Mr. Martinez said shyly.
NEWS
By Ana Arana and Ana Arana,Special to The Sun | April 4, 1991
BOGOTA, Colombia -- As Colombia makes progress in beating down the powerful Medellin drug cartel, other traffickers increasingly are taking control of the country's multimillion-dollar cocaine business.The operations of Medellin drug lords Jorge Luis, Fabio and Juan David Ochoa -- who recently surrendered to Colombian authorities -- and Pablo Escobar, the object of a massive manhunt, have suffered severe setbacks because of police assaults and raids.But over the past few months, as Medellin has faded, the Cali cartel and independent traffickers have increased their market share from 20 percent to 45 percent of cocaine exports.
NEWS
September 15, 2005
Julio Cesar Turbay, 89, who as president of Colombia negotiated the release of dozens of diplomats held hostage by leftist rebels for 61 days in 1980, died of heart failure Tuesday in Bogota, Interior and Justice Minister Sabas Pretelet said. Mr. Turbay led his nation from 1978 to 1982. In a terrorist attack on Feb. 27, 1980, fighters from the M-19 guerrilla group took 50 officials including 16 ambassadors and the papal delegate hostage at the Dominican ambassador's home. The rebels, dressed as soccer players, kicked a ball over the wall in front of the residence.
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