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Ozone Layer

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NEWS
By Tom Wicker | April 11, 1991
THE NEWS WAS very bad -- not so heart-rending as the plight of the Kurdish refugees but more deadly for the future: The ozone layer, at the latitude of the United States, is disappearing more than twice as swiftly as scientists had thought.That's no concern of yours?It is if you're young enough to be living, or have children living, within the next 50 years. The new calculations mean that in the coming half-century, about 12 million Americans will contract skin cancer and probably 200,000 will die -- nearly 20 times as many as formerly predicted.
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NEWS
January 12, 2012
Regarding your article about the proposed waste-to-energy plant in South Baltimore, I don't think it's a good idea to have another such plant in the area since there is already such a high concentration of pollution there ("Delay sought for trash-burning power plant in Fairfield," Jan. 9). If we are trying to reduce pollutants in the air, all a new plant would do is discourage recycling and make it even harder to build other "green" energy projects. That's a step backward, not forward.
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NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | November 4, 1994
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Six astronauts will begin one of the most intense studies of the planet's fragile ozone layer ever undertaken after being launched into space yesterday aboard space shuttle Atlantis.Atlantis' 11-day science mission is aimed at determining how badly and how fast humans are destroying their only shield from the sun's most harmful effects.This morning, a French astronaut, using the shuttle's Canadian-built, 50-foot mechanical arm, will deploy a German satellite that will study the sun's effect on the outer layers of the Earth's atmosphere.
BUSINESS
By Barbara Mahany and Barbara Mahany,Tribune newspapers | March 29, 2009
Spring is the season to start thinking about air conditioning, or at least to put in a call and have the gizmos looked over. What you really need to think about this year is that the inner workings of cooling systems in this country are due for a big change come Jan. 1 - in an effort to comply with an international green treaty and spare the ever-depleting ozone layer. There are at least five things you should know in the cooling department. What's Montreal got to do with it? There's an international treaty - the Montreal Protocol - that, if adhered to, could lead to the recovery of the ozone layer by 2050.
BUSINESS
By Barbara Mahany and Barbara Mahany,Tribune newspapers | March 29, 2009
Spring is the season to start thinking about air conditioning, or at least to put in a call and have the gizmos looked over. What you really need to think about this year is that the inner workings of cooling systems in this country are due for a big change come Jan. 1 - in an effort to comply with an international green treaty and spare the ever-depleting ozone layer. There are at least five things you should know in the cooling department. What's Montreal got to do with it? There's an international treaty - the Montreal Protocol - that, if adhered to, could lead to the recovery of the ozone layer by 2050.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie | April 5, 1991
The Earth's protective ozone layer is thinning twice as fast over the Northern Hemisphere as scientists had previously believed, according to preliminary NASA satellite observations.The new measurements of depletion -- made from 1978 to 1990 -- strengthen the case that man-made chemicals are responsible for destroying the ozone layer, and they greatly increase estimates of how many skin cancer deaths can be expected during the next 50 years. The Environmental Protection Agency, in making the data public, said yesterday that it would anticipate 200,000 additional deaths in the United States.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun Staff Writer | August 1, 1995
The digital bank thermometer in Catonsville showed 100 degrees. A few blocks away, Don Pulliam was steamed -- but not by the sun.During the current heat wave, he and many other motorists have learned that the cost of recharging an air conditioner has shot up along with the temperature.Behind the jump is an international effort to mend the Earth's ozone layer by phasing out chlorofluorocarbons, the refrigerants once used in virtually all air-conditioning and refrigeration equipment.Outside a Jiffy Lube on Frederick Road, Mr. Pulliam, a 60-year-old state employee, grumbled about having to pay nearly $80 for recharging the system under the hood of his 1989 Mercury Sable.
NEWS
By Doug Birch | September 12, 1991
The Discovery astronauts are scheduled to blast skyward tonight carrying a satellite designed to diagnose what ails the atmosphere's ozone layer, which shields Earth from the sun's harmful ultraviolet rays.Forecasters said yesterday there was a 90 percent chance that the weather would remain clear enough to launch the shuttle, its five-person crew and the 14,388-pound Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite as planned at 6:57 p.m. from the Kennedy Space Center.From its orbit 351 miles up, the insect-like satellite will sweep the sky with nine atmospheric instruments built to study how the complex chemistry and winds at altitudes ranging from six to 50 miles interact with solar rays -- and in particular, to what extent man-made chemicals are causing the planet's irreparable ozone layer to fray like the elbows on an old coat.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie | October 5, 1991
As spring dawns in the Antarctic, scientists are finding a larger-than-expected hole in the ozone layer, leading them to conclude that the Earth will have to live with less of its protective shield for the next several decades.Over the past 12 years, scientists have seen the size of the seasonal hole vary in a regular pattern. This was a year in which they expected it to shrink.But this week the hole became as big as it was last year and four out of the five previous years, according to Richard Stolarski, a research scientist at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Goddard Space Flight Center.
NEWS
October 23, 1995
THE SELECTION of the 1995 Nobel Prize winners in chemistry is not only a first for environmental science but a political affirmation of a controversial public policy for the world's nations.Awarding the prize to Drs. F. Sherwood Rowland, Mario Molina and Paul Crutzen amounts to a vindication of the scientific tenet that humans can destroy natural systems that support life on Earth.The decision to honor the two Americans and a Dutchman for their work explaining the thinning of the upper ozone layer by gases once used in spray cans and refrigerators underlines world support for the 1987 pledge by industrial nations to stop using these chemicals.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN STAFF | February 9, 2000
SOUTH POLE -- At the world's coldest and most isolated construction site, workers slog along six days a week, with no overtime and below-average wages. Welding torches crack. Metal freezes to bare skin. Twenty-four hours of sunlight causes "big eye," chronic insomnia. And the 9,300-foot altitude leaves recent arrivals gasping for breath. But all this scarcely matters to many building a new research station at the South Pole, who talk rapturously about pulling double shifts at the bottom of the world.
FEATURES
By Lou Carlozo and Lou Carlozo,Chicago Tribune | May 6, 1999
High in the Earth's stratosphere, the ozone layer that shields our planet from the sun's harmful rays is in jeopardy. And the statistics are alarming:In Antarctica, the ozone hole is more than twice the size of Europe. It now covers swaths of the Pacific and Atlantic oceans, and the southern tip of South America.That's the largest it has been since it was discovered in 1985, according to the World Meteorological Organization.In Australia, up to three out of four people are expected to develop skin cancer.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 14, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Government scientists have found that the harmless natural oil that gives peaches their perfume also kills fungus and other pests in the soil and could replace methyl bromide, a widely used pesticide that is toxic to people and also damages the planet's protective ozone layer.The peachy compound, called benzaldehyde, is manufactured synthetically. It is already used commercially in perfumes, flavorings, drugs and dyes, as are many similar oils, such as those distilled from lemon and peppermint.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 10, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The federal government launched a nationwide attack yesterday against a growing U.S. black market in Freon, a banned air-conditioning chemical that threatens the ozone layer but is being smuggled in large quantities along well-established routes of drug traffickers.The imported material, purchased for as little as $2 a pound and fetching as much as 10 times that on the black market, has been brought in from Russia, China, India, Australia and Britain, among other locations, and shipped through Mexico and Canada, officials said.
NEWS
December 29, 1995
THE END OF 1995 marks an end to the production of the ubiquitous chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) by industrialized nations, an exceptional global commitment to protect the earth's stratospheric ozone layer, which screens out harmful ultraviolet solar rays.It's a praiseworthy accomplishment, even if full restoration of the protective ozone layer to pre-1970 levels won't be achieved for ,, another 50 years under the current schedule.By then, the ozone-destroying chemicals so widely used for refrigeration, pest control, industrial cleaning and fire suppression will have been replaced by more benign chemicals and processes, under the 1987 Montreal Protocol adopted by most nations of the world.
NEWS
October 23, 1995
THE SELECTION of the 1995 Nobel Prize winners in chemistry is not only a first for environmental science but a political affirmation of a controversial public policy for the world's nations.Awarding the prize to Drs. F. Sherwood Rowland, Mario Molina and Paul Crutzen amounts to a vindication of the scientific tenet that humans can destroy natural systems that support life on Earth.The decision to honor the two Americans and a Dutchman for their work explaining the thinning of the upper ozone layer by gases once used in spray cans and refrigerators underlines world support for the 1987 pledge by industrial nations to stop using these chemicals.
FEATURES
By John Javna and John Javna,The EarthWorks Group | September 15, 1990
I'm sure you've heard people talk about the destruction of the ozone layer. It's an incredibly important topic; some scientists believe it's the most critical environmental issue we face.Yet not everyone's clear on the concept. Is ozone depletion the same thing as the greenhouse effect? Is there anything we can do about it? What does it mean if the ozone layer gets thinner? In fact, what is the ozone layer?Let's start with the basics:*The ozone layer is a shield of ozone gas located some six to 30 miles above the ground.
FEATURES
By John Javna | October 6, 1990
Which would you rather have -- a warm hamburger or the ozone layer? It's a silly question, but millions of people unwittingly make that decision every day because polystyrene foam products (commonly referred to as "Styrofoam") used in some fast-food restaurants are made with an ozone-depleting chemical called HCFC-22.Wait a minute. Haven't we heard that polystyrene foam food containers are no longer made with chemicals that destroy the ozone layer? Yes, but some businesses haven't been entirely honest with us.An example: Earlier this year, McDonald's claimed it wasn't using foam products made with ozone-depleting CFCs anymore.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 17, 1995
WASHINGTON -- As the deadline approaches for the United States to stop making almost all ozone-destroying refrigerants for domestic use, a private group is estimating that up to 22,000 tons a year, or one-third the amount sold in this country, may be smuggled in.The federal government has no current estimate of the amount )) of the chemicals, mostly chlorofluorocarbons, or CFCs, entering the country illegally. But last year officials said it was about 10,000 tons.An international agreement, in 1987, aims to limit damage to Earth's protective ozone layer but does not ban use of the chemicals.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun Staff Writer | August 1, 1995
The digital bank thermometer in Catonsville showed 100 degrees. A few blocks away, Don Pulliam was steamed -- but not by the sun.During the current heat wave, he and many other motorists have learned that the cost of recharging an air conditioner has shot up along with the temperature.Behind the jump is an international effort to mend the Earth's ozone layer by phasing out chlorofluorocarbons, the refrigerants once used in virtually all air-conditioning and refrigeration equipment.Outside a Jiffy Lube on Frederick Road, Mr. Pulliam, a 60-year-old state employee, grumbled about having to pay nearly $80 for recharging the system under the hood of his 1989 Mercury Sable.
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