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FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2013
— Oysters may or may not be an aphrodisiac, but they sure bring out passion in those who raise them for a living. Tim Devine barely knew from oysters when he was growing up in Easton, not far from the Chesapeake Bay. Now he's growing them on 10 acres of bay bottom near here that he's leased from the state, and professing to love the hard work and challenges involved in cultivating and selling his prized bivalves. "It just seemed like the stars aligned," Devine, 37, said of his transition from commercial photographer in New York City to yeoman oyster farmer.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2013
Marylanders love oysters, so news of restaurants focused on the slippery bivalves, like Bel Air's brand-new Main Street Oyster House, is always welcome. Opened in mid-October, the Oyster House is masterful with oysters and service and does a decent job with everything else. It's lively and fun and sure to be a huge hit with people looking for a good time in downtown Bel Air. The team behind the Oyster House also owns Ropewalk Tavern in Federal Hill and Ropewalk Oyster House, which opened in Fenwick Island, Del., last summer.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2013
Some dozen Baltimore restaurants are featuring special dishes local as part of the Maryland Crab & Oyster Celebration, a promotional dining event organized by Dine Downtown Baltimore. The promotion ends on officially Nov. 3, but some of these crab and oyster dishes will stick around, at least while oysters and crab are in season. View the full photo gallery here  
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | October 15, 2013
Baltimore's harbor may be too funky for swimming or fishing, but maybe a little gardening can help. Students from two city schools and some adult volunteers gathered at the National Aquarium Tuesday to "plant" some oysters in the Inner Harbor - not for eating but to try to improve the health of the ailing water body. "This is the first time anyone has tried planting this number of oysters in the Inner Harbor," said Adam Lindquist, coordinator of the Healthy Harbor campaign, an ambitious initiative aimed at making the Northwest and Middle branches of the Patapsco River swimmable and fishable by 2020.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2013
Ryleigh's presents its seventh annual Oysterfest this weekend on East Cross Street. Admission is free to the block party, which this year will include more than 10 raw bars, live music and the third-annual Baltimore Oyster Shucking Competition on Saturday at 5 p.m. The party, which will be held rain or shine, goes from noon to 9 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday. Ryleigh's is at 36 E. Cross St. in Federal Hill. For information about Oysterfest call 410-539-2093.  Elsewhere, this week's Gathering is at the Baltimore Museum of Industry.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2013
When Greg J. Hinkleman was 13, a friend's father taught him how to shuck oysters with a flat-head screwdriver. He has been shucking ever since. The 28-year-old Annapolis native now lives in Federal Hill, where he works as a manager at Ryleigh's Oyster. This year he will represent Ryleigh's in their third annual Oyster Shucking Championship on Saturday (noon-9 p.m.; 36 E. Cross St.; free), part of the restaurant's annual OysterFest event. Despite being an Oyster Shucking Championship newbie, Hinkleman has high hopes for his debut performance.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2013
There are still tickets left for Mermaid Kiss: Oyster Fest 2013, the Oyster Recovery Partnership's Oct. 1 fundraiser at the National Aquarium. The event is a showcase of cuisine prepared by members of the organization's Shell Recycling Alliance. More than 100 area restaurants, caterers and seafood wholesalers participate in the program by recycling their used oyster shells. The shells are used to restore oyster reefs and as bedding material for raising new oysters. The business-casual evening event includes lots of freshly shucked oysters, live music, hors d'oeuvres, and private access to aquarium exhibits.
NEWS
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2013
Welcome back to work. Summer is almost over, and the fall dining event season is about to kick into gear. This fall's highlights include the 30th edition of the Maryland Wine Festival, Baltimore's 20th Dining Out for Life event, the fifth go-round for Baltimore Beer Week, and The Baltimore Sun's inaugural Supper Club. Art to Dine For Sept 7-Dec. 8 Now in its 11th season, the Creative Alliance 's dining series features 19 one-of-a-kind parties in a variety of styles and settings, from a picnic in Remington to a tour through Green Mount Cemetery that's followed by a champagne brunch in a private apartment.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2013
Oyster Bay Grille is set to open late this month in the Towson Circle development. It will take over the back restaurant space that has sat vacant since Vin closed in 2008. The team behind Oyster Bay Grille includes brothers Nick and John Daskalakis and their longtime friend Sypros Stavrakas, who was a principal in the development of Taverna Athena, an original Harborplace tenant, and the well-remembered Fells Point restaurant Opa. Joining them is Christopher Vocci, formerly of the Baltimore Country Club, who was originally brought on at Oyster Bay Grille as a menu consultant but was ultimately hired on as executive chef.
FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2013
As gulls and cormorants perched on the walls of Fort Carroll looked on, a crabbing boat stopped long enough to jettison 30 bushel baskets of very special oyster shells into the Patapsco River. On the boat, a handful of Pasadena residents spent their Saturday afternoon planting young oysters in a reef, just as they might have been putting in a crop of tomatoes or zinnias. "We call it Oysters Rock, because we live on Rock Creek," said Chris Wallis, 68, the day's volunteer director.
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