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FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2014
- With oysters showing signs of revival in the Chesapeake Bay, some are trying to bring the bivalves back in the bay's second largest tributary, the Potomac River. Just two years into their fledgling effort to restore the river's once-bountiful oyster population, however, organizers are raising alarms about a large marina proposed in Charles County near the Potomac's largest and formerly most productive oyster bar. The 143-slip marina would provide berths for residents and guests of a 900-acre resort community planned on the waterfront here.
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FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2014
Maryland's depleted oyster population has more than doubled since 2010, state officials reported Wednesday, giving state scientists hope the bivalves are on track to regain a "substantial foothold" in the Chesapeake Bay after being devastated by diseases over the past 30 years. An annual fall survey by the Department of Natural Resources found that the number and size of oysters dredged up from more than 250 longtime oyster bars had increased for the third straight year. The oyster "biomass index," as it's known, has reached the highest level measured since around the time the bay's bivalves began to be ravaged by two parasitic diseases.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2014
Pop-up shops - businesses that open temporarily to present new concepts before hopefully graduating to a permanent location - make sense, especially in Baltimore. We can be a capricious group to impress, so a business that chooses to refine its execution on a small scale, rather than commit to a formidable lease too soon, is acting wisely. Opened by Phil Han of Dooby's last summer, the Hatch is a business incubator located in the lower-level space of the Park Plaza in Mount Vernon.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2014
My tablemates at Tark's Grill had never dined there before, so I gave them a brief history lesson. I told them about Harvey's, the restaurant that flourished in this Green Spring Station location for about 20 years, from the early 1980s to 2000, and about the string of ambitious restaurants that moved into the space after Harvey's closed. None of them lasted long, and the location began to feel jinxed. Then Tark's opened in 2008, and all was right again. Now, as then, the secret to the success of Tark's was a simple formula.
FEATURES
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
Two watermen were fined nearly $1,500 for oyster poaching on the Eastern Shore, the first conviction stemming from a network of radar and cameras the state launched in 2010 to detect illegal seafood harvesting. Brothers William and Irving Catlin, both of Westover in Somerset County, were fined $1,000 and $450, respectively, after state Natural Resources Police caught them with seven bushels of oysters Nov. 25, Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler's office said Friday. A police officer detected the watermen's boat in an oyster sanctuary area near Deal Island and monitored it as he responded to their location, according to the state Department of Natural Resources.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2014
Serving raw oysters on the half shell, classic cocktails and beer and wine, Dylan's Oyster Cellar has taken up a six-month residency in The Hatch, the incubator space in Mount Vernon's Park Plaza Building operated by Phil Han, the owner of Dooby's. The pop-up oyster bar is from Dylan Salmon, formerly of Woodberry Kitchen, who plans to operate at The Hatch for six months while he scouts out a permanent location.       #sigshell { padding: 10px; float: left; width: 320px; height: 52px; margin: 20px 0px; display: block; }
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2014
Five Queen Anne's County watermen have been charged with illegally taking 51 bushels of oysters from a protected area near the mouth of the Wicomico River in Tangier Sound, Maryland Department of Natural Resources officials said. Acting on a tip, Natural Resources Police officers used radar and cameras to track several boats tonging in the Evans Oyster Harvest Reserve Area, they said. The waterman charged are: Ryan Daniel Baxter, 20, of Queen Anne; Benjamin Leonard Reihl, 26, of Rock Hall; Adam Vincent Reihl, 21, of Church Hill; Harvey Thomas Bowers, 49, of Chestertown, and George Albert Lee, 45, of Dominion.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2014
Beer is helping the Chesapeake Bay. Seriously. Since 2011, a portion of sales from Flying Dog Brewery's Pearl Necklace Oyster Stout have assisted in planting nearly 3 million oysters in the Bay. Each sold bottle of Pearl Necklace Oyster Stout, which is brewed with oysters from Rappahannock River, allows the Oyster Recovery Partnership ( ORP ) to plant 10 oysters, a ccording to Erin Weston, director of communications for Flying Dog. On March 1, the Frederick company will present its latest donation to the ORP (from 2013 sales)
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2014
Four Maryland men were charged with power dredging for oysters in a sanctuary on Tilghman Island, the state's Department of Natural Resources said Friday. DNR police charged Bartlett Wade Murphy Jr., 39, Benjamin Murphy, 62, both of Tilghman Island, and Willis Leanard Coleman Jr., 59 of Cambridge, and Robert Andrew Walker, 43 of Hurlock, with removing oysters from the Harris Creek Sanctuary. The state is rebuilding reefs within the sanctuary to restore the bay's oyster population.
NEWS
By Sarah Polus, Capital News Service | December 30, 2013
The weeks leading to the holidays tend to be the most active for oyster poachers in the Chesapeake Bay, but the Maryland Department of Natural Resources and state police were hoping in recent days that new technology and harsher penalties would help them crack down on illegal oyster harvesting. Poaching includes harvesting undersized oysters, exceeding bushel limits or harvesting in areas designated as sanctuaries, said Natural Resources Police Capt. David Larsen said. Mostly due to overharvesting and disease, "currently less than 1 percent of historic levels of oysters exist in the bay," said Sarah Widman, a Department of Natural Resources Fishery spokeswoman.
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