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Oysters

ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2014
One of the more well-known, but less understood, rules about oysters says that they should be eaten only during months that have an "R," so from May to August, they should be off the menu. This guideline goes back hundreds of years and is rooted in lack of reliable refrigeration and a need to allow oysters to reproduce during the summer months. When oysters reproduce, they become weak and may be susceptible to disease. Today, thanks to modern refrigeration and the development of new breeds of oysters that do not reproduce in the summer, oysters are fine to eat any time.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2014
Eastern Shore Oyster Stew from Thames Street Oyster House Thames Street Oyster House is known for its impressive selection of oysters available on the half-shell and for Chef Eric Houseknecht's sophisticated food. His oyster stew is "creamy, brothy and addicting," says Thames Street's owner, Candace Beattie. It's also simple enough for anyone to make at home. Yield: About 4 1/2 cups 2 tablespoons butter 1/4 cup celery, diced 1/4 cup yellow onion, diced 1/2 cup dry vermouth 1 pint shucked oysters in their liquor 1 pint cream 1 tablespoon fresh thyme, chopped 1 bay leaf Salt and pepper to taste Westminster Bakers Co. oyster crackers for serving In a 2 1/2-quart pot over medium heat, slowly melt the butter.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
When Nick Schauman was a toddler, his grandfather, Larry Hunton, taught him how to eat raw oysters. Hunton let his grandson tag along on trips to Lexington Market, where the duo would sit at the raw bar (Schauman sat on top of it) and slurp down oysters "faster than the man could shuck them. " Back then, ordering a dozen oysters simply meant asking for "oysters. " Forty years later, at oyster bars and fishmongers across the region, "boutique" oysters harvested from oyster farms - many of them local - are the norm.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
2500 B.C.: The earliest evidence of oyster harvesting - shell deposits called middens - indicate that people living in the Chesapeake region were eating oysters and other shellfish as long as early as 2,500 B.C. 1600s: Early colonial settlers frequently remark on the size and quantity of oysters in the Chesapeake Bay. Oysters were likely harvested using boats, rakes and by wading into shallow water to simply gather them. 1700s: Around 1700, oyster harvesters began using tongs to retrieve oysters from the water.
NEWS
By Michael Hild | May 27, 2014
It's no secret that the health of the Chesapeake Bay has been in peril for decades, but ocean acidification poses what may be the greatest threat to the oyster population of the bay. Sadly, for most people this will go unnoticed. It's not like the obvious environmental threat of trees being cut or land being bulldozed. Damage occurring to oysters and other aquatic species can't be seen from a casual observation of the surface, but the threat is real. With water covering so much of the earth's surface it's easy enough for people to think that our waters can handle whatever we pour into them, but nothing could be further from the truth.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2014
- With oysters showing signs of revival in the Chesapeake Bay, some are trying to bring the bivalves back in the bay's second largest tributary, the Potomac River. Just two years into their fledgling effort to restore the river's once-bountiful oyster population, however, organizers are raising alarms about a large marina proposed in Charles County near the Potomac's largest and formerly most productive oyster bar. The 143-slip marina would provide berths for residents and guests of a 900-acre resort community planned on the waterfront here.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2014
Maryland's depleted oyster population has more than doubled since 2010, state officials reported Wednesday, giving state scientists hope the bivalves are on track to regain a "substantial foothold" in the Chesapeake Bay after being devastated by diseases over the past 30 years. An annual fall survey by the Department of Natural Resources found that the number and size of oysters dredged up from more than 250 longtime oyster bars had increased for the third straight year. The oyster "biomass index," as it's known, has reached the highest level measured since around the time the bay's bivalves began to be ravaged by two parasitic diseases.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2014
Pop-up shops - businesses that open temporarily to present new concepts before hopefully graduating to a permanent location - make sense, especially in Baltimore. We can be a capricious group to impress, so a business that chooses to refine its execution on a small scale, rather than commit to a formidable lease too soon, is acting wisely. Opened by Phil Han of Dooby's last summer, the Hatch is a business incubator located in the lower-level space of the Park Plaza in Mount Vernon.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2014
My tablemates at Tark's Grill had never dined there before, so I gave them a brief history lesson. I told them about Harvey's, the restaurant that flourished in this Green Spring Station location for about 20 years, from the early 1980s to 2000, and about the string of ambitious restaurants that moved into the space after Harvey's closed. None of them lasted long, and the location began to feel jinxed. Then Tark's opened in 2008, and all was right again. Now, as then, the secret to the success of Tark's was a simple formula.
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