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NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | April 17, 2002
Richard Zaworski of Baltimore requested a recipe for Oyster Pot Pie. "Years ago," he wrote, "my mother made it for my family and we enjoyed it a great deal, but no one can remember the recipe." Marlene Zaworski Mundie, no address given, responded. "I have had this recipe for a few years, but it is not a family recipe. My husband loves it. It is especially good when it snows outside. The white sauce can also be used for chipped beef." And, noting the name of the man seeking the recipe, she added, "Maybe I'll find a lost relative."
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ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2012
The Maryland Crab and Oyster Celebration continues through Sunday. Look for chefs' specials featuring Maryland crab and oyster at some 20 restaurants. Alewife is dishing up a smoked tomato gazpacho topped with Maryland crab and roasted corn relish; Charleston is serving Cindy Wolf's signature cornmeal-fried oysters with lemon-cayenne mayonnaise; and Ryleigh's Oyster in Federal Hill is offering anywhere from seven to 14 varieties of raw oysters every day. For a full list of participating restaurants, along with their special menu items, go to the Dine Downtown Baltimore website . Follow Baltimore Diner on Twitter @gorelickingood
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2011
A Southern Maryland chef swept the National Oyster Cook-Off on Saturday at the St. Mary's County Fairgrounds, a festival organizer said. Chef Loic Francois Jaffres, who owns and operates Café des Artistes in Leonardtown, took the contest's three top prizes with his white wine-sautéed appetizer, oysters casino wrapped in spinach. Jaffres' oysters were poached in seafood stock, dusted with panko breadcrumbs and served in shot glasses. There were contestants from more than 10 states.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2011
Fells Point, a waterfront neighborhood, has had a historic shortage of good seafood restaurants. There are one or two very good high-end choices, but the casual options are meager and the mid-range options non-existent. Here comes Thames Street Oyster House , which in the few weeks since its opening has been drawing a steady stream of customers. Part of the instant success at Thames Street has to do with the popular owner, Candace Beattie, who developed a following behind the bar at nearby Alexander's.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | February 3, 2013
Now for a bit of good news - and from an environmental group at that. Drew Koslow, the Choptank Riverkeeper, reports that while walking the shore of Harris Creek in Talbot County, he saw an "amazing" abundance of oysters growing in the intertidal zone, inundated by water at high tide but exposed to the air at ebb. "You literally couldn't take a step without walking on oysters," Koslow said in a recent release by the Mid-Shore Riverkeeper Conservancy....
NEWS
August 24, 2005
THE LAST TWO decades have been disastrous for the Chesapeake Bay oyster. The shellfish population has been so decimated, mostly by disease but also from pollution and overharvesting, that the federal government is studying whether to declare it an endangered species and state officials are pondering whether to import Asian oysters to augment and possibly supplant the native stock. With that in mind, it's downright shocking to find out that the Maryland Department of Natural Resources has proposed making it significantly easier for watermen to harvest the remaining oysters in certain areas of the bay. Admittedly, the DNR is under considerable pressure from Republican lawmakers to aid watermen and seafood processors whose incomes have waned as the oyster supply has plummeted.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun Staff Writer | March 31, 1994
The Chesapeake Bay's disease-battered oyster industry continues its downward slide, with record-low harvests this season in Maryland and Virginia.Landings of oysters reported in Maryland for the season that ends today are expected to be only 70,000 bushels, down 40 percent from the previous year's record poor catch, according to the state Department of Natural Resources.In Virginia, meanwhile, the harvest of market-size oysters from publicly owned river bottom has fallen to about 6,000 bushels, from 40,000 the year before, according to the Virginia Marine Resources Commission.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | March 29, 1995
Young oysters are growing naturally on an old bed in the South River, rather than being planted there by state workers.The discovery, on an oyster bar near the mouth of Selby Bay, has renewed environmentalists' hopes that the ailing Chesapeake Bay shellfish population may be starting to recover."
NEWS
July 24, 1995
Blue Oyster Cult was a rock band from an era that also produced acts named Kiss and Alice Cooper. They're not to be confused with a veritable new oyster cult that has sprung up among Anne Arundel waterfront residents who have decided that one way to save Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries is to cultivate oysters.The Amberley Community Association recently voted to spend $500 to start a reef on a tenth of an acre at the juncture of White hall and Ridout creeks, west of the Chesapeake Bay Bridge.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2011
— The dock built to hold water-filled tanks of baby oysters stands empty. The new marina for landing fully grown bivalves is being used for now by some crabbers. Encouraged by a new state policy to boost private oyster farming, Jay Robinson and Ryan Bergey applied last fall to lease upward of 1,000 acres in Fishing Bay in southern Dorchester County. They planned to "plant" 100 million hatchery-spawned oysters on the bottom there this year and raise them for sale to restaurants and seafood wholesalers.
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