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By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Contributing Writer | September 23, 1992
Now that we are again living in the months containing the letter "R," fresh oysters should abound. What better way to emulate the classic, labor-intensive oysters Rockefeller appetizer than with a speedy main dish soup with the same essences?The elegant soup recipe below can be concocted in less than 30 minutes. The onion and potato serve a dual purpose: They add character and they thickening the soup when it's pureed. The oysters are added at the end and cooked just until warm, so they won't become tough.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom-Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2012
Though it opened just last year, Gunner's Grille in Taneytown feels like it's been around forever. That's both good and bad. On the good side, the restaurant's rustic atmosphere is downright charming, and its interpretations of classics, like chicken-fried steak, are capable and comforting. Unfortunately, at times, our dinner also recalled an era of fewer dining choices (and no dining critique websites), when restaurants could get away with spotty service and food that didn't quite live up to its description.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 17, 2003
The brightly lighted dining room of the Costas Inn, just past several "female revue" clubs on North Point Boulevard, has all the atmosphere of a high school cafeteria. But that's OK - a crab house doesn't need much atmosphere, especially if the crabs are good, as they are at the Costas Inn. The Costas Inn has been an unpretentious Dundalk landmark since 1971, and the crowds still show up, ordering piles of crabs and pounding them to bits on tables covered with brown paper. The large room gets very loud, but everyone sounds happy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 4, 2004
Add another restaurant to the local scene. And to the number of nosh-eries owned by Steve de Castro. The B-more hotspot honcho can already claim the Ruth's Chris Steakhouses, Havana Club, Eurasian Harbor and Babalu Grill in his fleet of upscale eateries. And as of this week, he's added another. The Blue Sea Grill has just opened in the spot vacated last year by the short-lived Cafe Asia-turned-Red Coral. It's in a convenient spot, tucked between Ruth's Chris and Babalu on Water Street. The space features seascape paintings on curvy blue walls, with banquettes and tables throughout.
FEATURES
By Sylvia Badger | December 21, 1991
LITTLE BUTCHER BOY MEAT MARKET 9725 York Road, York Village Shopping Center. Open: 8 a.m. to 7 Mondays to Wednesdays and Saturdays; 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. Thursdays and Fridays; 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sundays. Call (410) 628-1828. Fax (410) 628-1677. Don't let the name fool you; this is not an ordinary meat market. How do homemade rolls and sandwich breads sound? Or perhaps Clams Casino ($4.99 for 8), Oysters Rockefeller ($4.99 for six) or homemade crab soup ($2.99 a pint)?I originally stopped at the market to buy back fin crab meat.
FEATURES
By Janice Baker | November 4, 1990
It was a good, small ad: "Serious Steaks/The Baltimore Grille/A Classic Steakhouse in the Omni Inner Harbor Hotel/Call 385-6601." What do you think of the brash swagger of "serious steaks"? Followed by a phone number? It reads like a call to Philip Marlowe. Serious steaks at this location. Step on it. (What are frivolous steaks? Silly, sniggering steaks? Do some steaks these days wish themselves soybean patties?)Steaks at the new Baltimore Grille in the Omni are big hunks of meat. The restaurant's shining knives look like lethal weapons, and the veal chop weighs a pound.
NEWS
By Jody K. Vilschick and Jody K. Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 25, 2001
There's a new restaurant in town - at least, that's what Mike Strati, manager of Blue Pointe Grille, wants everyone to think. The former Hunter's Lodge restaurant closed during the summer to reopen recently as Blue Pointe Grill. "We absolutely redid everything, rethought everything we were doing," Strati says. "We changed the appearance of the place, inside and out, and brought our prices down so that anyone can go there anytime." Changes to the menu, Strati says, include a new emphasis on seafood.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lynn Williams and Lynn Williams,Sun Restaurant Critic | October 12, 1990
The Baltimore Grille Where: Omni Inner Harbor Hotel, 101 W. Fayette St.Hours: Open for lunch 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Mondays to Fridays; dinner 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. Mondays to Thursdays, 6 p.m. to 11 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays; Sunday brunch 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.Credit Cards: All major credit cards.Features: Steaks, chops, seafood.ll: 385-6601. The Baltimore Grille, some people might say, fills a much-needed void in Baltimore's dining scene. In other words, is this restaurant really necessary?"Baltimore needs a great steakhouse," spokesmen for the newly renovated Omni Hotel maintain.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 4, 2004
Add another restaurant to the local scene. And to the number of nosh-eries owned by Steve de Castro. The B-more hotspot honcho can already claim the Ruth's Chris Steakhouses, Havana Club, Eurasian Harbor and Babalu Grill in his fleet of upscale eateries. And as of this week, he's added another. The Blue Sea Grill has just opened in the spot vacated last year by the short-lived Cafe Asia-turned-Red Coral. It's in a convenient spot, tucked between Ruth's Chris and Babalu on Water Street. The space features seascape paintings on curvy blue walls, with banquettes and tables throughout.
FEATURES
By Mary Maushard | November 8, 1990
Some of Baltimore's best ethnic restaurants are in the unlikeliest settings. Away from downtown, these restaurants operate where rents are lower and parking easier. But at the same time, there are fewer potential customers passing by -- especially tourists and suburbanites -- and it can take months, even years, for word of mouth to spread a restaurant's plaudits.So, it seems, is Puerta del Sol, a Spanish and Peruvian restaurant on Harford Road in Hamilton, a working-class neighborhood in northeastern Baltimore with no particular ethnic base.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 17, 2003
The brightly lighted dining room of the Costas Inn, just past several "female revue" clubs on North Point Boulevard, has all the atmosphere of a high school cafeteria. But that's OK - a crab house doesn't need much atmosphere, especially if the crabs are good, as they are at the Costas Inn. The Costas Inn has been an unpretentious Dundalk landmark since 1971, and the crowds still show up, ordering piles of crabs and pounding them to bits on tables covered with brown paper. The large room gets very loud, but everyone sounds happy.
NEWS
By Jody K. Vilschick and Jody K. Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 25, 2001
There's a new restaurant in town - at least, that's what Mike Strati, manager of Blue Pointe Grille, wants everyone to think. The former Hunter's Lodge restaurant closed during the summer to reopen recently as Blue Pointe Grill. "We absolutely redid everything, rethought everything we were doing," Strati says. "We changed the appearance of the place, inside and out, and brought our prices down so that anyone can go there anytime." Changes to the menu, Strati says, include a new emphasis on seafood.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | October 22, 2000
Let me introduce you to the restaurant that was the ne plus ultra of dining out when I first arrived in Baltimore almost 30 years ago. Things are and always have been tres sophisticated at the Prime Rib. The walls are black, the mirrors framed in gold, and the floors covered in swank wall-to-wall leopard-print carpeting. Someone is actually at the piano playing that suave piano music. And note the paintings: just slightly titillating but oh so tasteful, like that naked Leda cozying up to a swan.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Contributing Writer | September 23, 1992
Now that we are again living in the months containing the letter "R," fresh oysters should abound. What better way to emulate the classic, labor-intensive oysters Rockefeller appetizer than with a speedy main dish soup with the same essences?The elegant soup recipe below can be concocted in less than 30 minutes. The onion and potato serve a dual purpose: They add character and they thickening the soup when it's pureed. The oysters are added at the end and cooked just until warm, so they won't become tough.
FEATURES
By Mary Maushard | August 6, 1992
For what the Prime Rib charges, everything about dining there should be prime. Prime service. Prime presentation. Prime food.It isn't.The prices are prime. As in $21 for a filet mignon. Or $19 for two crab cakes. No salad. No potato. No vegetable. Those are ala carte. You'll pay $3 for a baked potato, $4.25 for a dish of creamed spinach, $4.50 for a small dish of sauteed mushrooms.We know the Prime Rib is successful -- try getting a prime-time Saturday reservation there with less than two weeks' notice.
FEATURES
By Desiree Vivea and Desiree Vivea,Copley News Service | February 19, 1992
Resting safe below the tumultuous surf, nestled among the starfish and pier pilings, dwell sumptuous bivalves just waiting to be harvested.Starting out in infancy no bigger than a pinpoint, "spats," or baby oysters, grow up to become one of the world's most relished species of shellfish. From French Marenne to Blue Point, Chincoteague to Canadian Golden Mantle, oysters by any other name would taste as sweet.Oysters inspire not only the palate but the mind's fancy. Creole legend has it that errant husbands, sidetracked in their wanderings and tardy in returning home for the evening, could placate irate wives with a gift of oysters.
FEATURES
By Mary Maushard | August 6, 1992
For what the Prime Rib charges, everything about dining there should be prime. Prime service. Prime presentation. Prime food.It isn't.The prices are prime. As in $21 for a filet mignon. Or $19 for two crab cakes. No salad. No potato. No vegetable. Those are ala carte. You'll pay $3 for a baked potato, $4.25 for a dish of creamed spinach, $4.50 for a small dish of sauteed mushrooms.We know the Prime Rib is successful -- try getting a prime-time Saturday reservation there with less than two weeks' notice.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom-Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2012
Though it opened just last year, Gunner's Grille in Taneytown feels like it's been around forever. That's both good and bad. On the good side, the restaurant's rustic atmosphere is downright charming, and its interpretations of classics, like chicken-fried steak, are capable and comforting. Unfortunately, at times, our dinner also recalled an era of fewer dining choices (and no dining critique websites), when restaurants could get away with spotty service and food that didn't quite live up to its description.
FEATURES
By Sylvia Badger | December 21, 1991
LITTLE BUTCHER BOY MEAT MARKET 9725 York Road, York Village Shopping Center. Open: 8 a.m. to 7 Mondays to Wednesdays and Saturdays; 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. Thursdays and Fridays; 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sundays. Call (410) 628-1828. Fax (410) 628-1677. Don't let the name fool you; this is not an ordinary meat market. How do homemade rolls and sandwich breads sound? Or perhaps Clams Casino ($4.99 for 8), Oysters Rockefeller ($4.99 for six) or homemade crab soup ($2.99 a pint)?I originally stopped at the market to buy back fin crab meat.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lynn Williams and Lynn Williams,Sun Restaurant Critic | November 9, 1990
The new Louisiana Cafe has an undeniable magic. It takes the spicy, funky cooking of the bayou and the French quarter and presents it in a sophisticated uptown setting. This inspired combination of down-home with big-night-out has incredible appeal.The owners have taken an awfully big gamble here. Their venture is housed in the former home of two doomed Mexican restaurants, Dante's and Tortilla Flats. The street is being torn up, and right outside are two of Baltimore's least serene settings, the Block and local police headquarters.
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