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By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2014
Four Maryland men were charged with power dredging for oysters in a sanctuary on Tilghman Island, the state's Department of Natural Resources said Friday. DNR police charged Bartlett Wade Murphy Jr., 39, Benjamin Murphy, 62, both of Tilghman Island, and Willis Leanard Coleman Jr., 59 of Cambridge, and Robert Andrew Walker, 43 of Hurlock, with removing oysters from the Harris Creek Sanctuary. The state is rebuilding reefs within the sanctuary to restore the bay's oyster population.
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FEATURES
By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
One of the world's most diverse and intriguing foods, the oyster is heavily influenced in its development and flavor by where it is grown. As the location of a vineyard can change the taste and texture of a grape -- a concept known as terroir -- oyster flavor is driven by merroir, the content and characteristics of the sea in which it grows. Experimenting with different types of oysters is delicious, fun and enlightening -- especially when you do some research before diving into that dozen.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2014
One of the more well-known, but less understood, rules about oysters says that they should be eaten only during months that have an "R," so from May to August, they should be off the menu. This guideline goes back hundreds of years and is rooted in lack of reliable refrigeration and a need to allow oysters to reproduce during the summer months. When oysters reproduce, they become weak and may be susceptible to disease. Today, thanks to modern refrigeration and the development of new breeds of oysters that do not reproduce in the summer, oysters are fine to eat any time.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | October 1, 2014
Oyster season opened on a tentative note Wednesday, amid doubts about whether a two-year rebound in the commercial harvest of the Chesapeake Bay's bivalves could continue. There appeared to be fewer watermen working Wednesday in Broad Creek, an Eastern Shore tributary of the Choptank River where more than 120 boats congregated on opening day last year, according to Drew Koslow, the Choptank Riverkeeper. Watermen said the oysters they were pulling up with scissor-like tongs seemed to be smaller, too. "We're not expecting the catch to be as good as it was last year," said P.T. Hambleton, who runs a seafood business in Bozman.  Watermen who'd checked reefs before the season started found oysters smaller than what they'd pulled up last fall, Hambleton said.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2011
Dave Coakley from Baltimore was looking for the recipe for the oyster stew that is served at the Peppermill restaurant in Towson. He said it "is the best I've tasted. " I contacted the restaurant and spoke with Rick Ziegel , the owner of the Peppermill, and he graciously agreed to share his restaurant's recipe. He says he frequently makes this at home himself and was kind enough to help me modify the recipe for the home cook. He told me that at the restaurant they make large quantities of the soup base and steam the oysters separately.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2013
The history, current state and future of oyster production in the Chesapeake region are the subject of a four-part Sunday afternoon discussion series at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels . State of the Oyster , the first in a planned annual series of public programming initiatives called Community Conversations, is being presented by the museum in conjunction with the Maryland Humanities Council. The program is accompanied by an art exhibition featuring work by Chesapeake artist Marc Catelli and photographer Heather Davidson.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | December 26, 2007
It is a custom in this town at year's end for folks to gather around a plate of raw oysters. The oysters are loaded both with tangy flavor and with zinc that puts fuel in your firebox. The gathering provides good cheer. As 2007 drew to a close, I visited several spots around Baltimore where bivalves were plump and the conversations friendly. There was nary a bad mollusk or moment in my expedition. That means, of course, I will repeat this ritual next December. Nick's Inner Harbor Seafood Address --Cross Street Market, 1065 S. Charles St. Phone --410-685-2020 Hours --11 a.m.-7 p.m. Monday-Thursday, 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday This raw bar in the colorful Cross Street Market features comfortable seats, prize-winning shuckers and easy conversation.
NEWS
January 11, 2010
All the recent emphasis on enforcing our way to a clean Bay is completely misguided. Bay water quality will continue to fall short because the bay lacks oysters -- which are nature's primary way of removing excess nutrients. Everyone contributes to bay water quality impairments. We are on the right track with the point source investments that have been made as well as expecting greater efforts from agriculture, new development and urban storm water. However, we continue to deceive ourselves if we think attainable (and sustainable)
NEWS
By Christopher White | February 7, 2010
A watershed moment in Maryland history unfolded last month when Chesapeake Bay watermen marched on Annapolis to protest Gov. Martin O'Malley's Oyster Restoration and Aquaculture Development Plan. At stake was whether the bay's shellfish beds will continue to be in the public domain -- a public fishery -- or whether they will be reassigned, in whole or in part, as private leases available for aquaculture. Unfortunately, this issue is typically presented as a choice between preserving the watermen's way of life and promoting oyster restoration and aquaculture.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | December 15, 2011
An Eastern Shore watermen faces up to $28,000 in fines for multiple oystering violations in Dorchester County, the Maryland Natural Resources Police said Thursday. Officers charged Joshua T. Tieder, 23, of Taylors Island with 13 counts of possessing undersized oysters, 14 counts of failing to tag the location of his harvest and one count of exceeding the daily catch limit. Tieder was seen leaving the Wingate harbor boat ramp with oyster bushels that he later put in a nearby marsh, according to police.
ENTERTAINMENT
Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Last fall, Timonium - home to the state fair and a head-spinning number of chain businesses - welcomed a city favorite, Ryleigh's Oyster. Since then, the Baltimore County version (it calls itself Ryleigh's Oyster Hunt Valley) of the Federal Hill staple has seen steady crowds regularly fill its tidy, well-designed space. On a recent Friday evening, with the location's one-year anniversary weeks away, Ryleigh's hummed along at an appropriately brisk pace. It was the end of the workweek for many in the area, and both bar areas (one near the front entrance and another in the back)
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
John "Jack" M.E. Hasslinger Jr., an accountant who managed a well-known family seafood business, died of heart disease Tuesday at his Mount Airy home. He was 63. Born in Baltimore and raised on Jody Way in Timonium, he was the son of John M.E. Hasslinger Sr., a piano tuner and instructor, and the former Ellen Regina Cosgrove, a homemaker. He was a 1969 graduate of Loyola High School at Blakefield and earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in business administration at Loyola University Maryland.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2014
We love a good anniversary. Baltimore is about to host a huge, weeklong celebration for the 200th anniversary of "The Star-Spangled Banner. " Unless they're traveling by frigate, everybody and his brother is going to be passing through Locust Point on the way to Fort McHenry. Also celebrating - Locust Point's own Wine Market Bistro, which is marking its 10th anniversary this month with various promotions and by feting diners with complimentary hors d'ouevres and wine tastings. The restaurant has earned the celebration.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2014
Oyster Bay Grille has closed. Sunday was the last night of operation for the restaurant, according to Christopher Vocci, the restaurant's chef, who confirmed the closing in an emailed message but offered no further details. The restaurant's team also included brothers Nick and John Daskalakis and their longtime friend   Spyros Stavrakas, who was a principal in the development of Taverna Athena, an original Harborplace tenant, and the well-remembered Fells Point restaurant Opa. The closing comes less than two months after the opening of Towson Square, a nearly adjacent $85-million entertainment complex on East Joppa Road anchored by the 15-screen Cinemark movie multiplex.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2014
"Fish on!" called P.J. Klavon, as he reached for a trap hauled from the placid waters of the Tred Avon River. Inside the black metal cage wriggled a single white perch, a safe distance from a blue crab. The fish weren't exactly jumping last week into the Bay Commitment, a 41-foot research vessel owned by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. After a morning's work collecting more than 100 traps set in the river the day before, the vessel's crew had seen barely a half-bushel of crabs, fewer than two dozen fish and a single eel. Klavon, a lieutenant junior grade in NOAA's uniformed service, didn't have many opportunities to sing out. Fortunately for these trappers, they were fishing for science, not a living.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
Clifton Wilson, an inmate at the state's Eastern Pre-Release Unit, spent last week in the great outdoors, relocating oysters from cages on private piers near Thomas Point on the Chesapeake Bay to a sanctuary in nearby Glebe Bay. To the North East resident, it was a throwback to growing up near waters teeming with wildlife. For state officials eager to help rebuild the oyster population, Wilson's work was an example of getting people involved in the Marylanders Grow Oysters program.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
2500 B.C.: The earliest evidence of oyster harvesting - shell deposits called middens - indicate that people living in the Chesapeake region were eating oysters and other shellfish as long as early as 2,500 B.C. 1600s: Early colonial settlers frequently remark on the size and quantity of oysters in the Chesapeake Bay. Oysters were likely harvested using boats, rakes and by wading into shallow water to simply gather them. 1700s: Around 1700, oyster harvesters began using tongs to retrieve oysters from the water.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2014
Coming this fall, Meyerhoff patrons will be able to slurp some oysters before their Offenbach and Orff. A third location for Ryleigh's Oyster is coming to the multi-level restaurant space on Cathedral Street that most recently housed Mari Luna Bistro, which closed in January. "We want to get it open by the beginning of show season," said Ryleigh's owner Brian McComas, who owns and operates the original Ryleigh's in Federal Hill and a second, Ryleigh's Hunt Valley, on Padonia Road.   The Meyerhoff's main attraction, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, begins its fall season on Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2014
Second of two parts; read first article here . Brian McComas can't quite remember the first oyster he ever ate, but he guesses that before swallowing the slippery seafood, he was "a bit apprehensive. " McComas, who with wife Jennifer owns the Ryleigh's Oyster restaurants in Federal Hill and Timonium, grew up in Baltimore County but spent many hours with his grandparents, who lived on the Eastern Shore. He probably tried that first oyster around age 4, he thinks, at the behest of his Grandfather Wallace.
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